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  • How to Build a Fireplace Bookcase

    I was an adjunct college instructor so I often do this type of thing with a tutorial in mind. I took pictures as I was building and wrote notes as I went along, but wrote mst of the tutorial when I was done.

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  • Porch-Swing Fire Pit

    You are quite welcome! Glad it was useful!

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  • Wampa Star Wars Faux Taxidermy Mount

    Very nice! I do not have the artistic talent to sculpt clay like this, but there are several techniques and ideas here that I can use for animatronics. Thansk for sharing!

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  • DIY Compact 3D Printed Animatronic Eye Mechanism

    Very nice design and build! I have a question at the very end if you want to skip the lengthy preamble. I build a lot of animatronics and robotics projects and have been looking for an eye mechanism to support a face tracking project in a head with tri-axial movement in the head and bi-directional movement the eyes. I've tried a couple of triaxial deisigns and have several working Inmoov heads, but most lack lids, require a faceplate or large support in the rear, and are not very flexible in terms of mounting. The key to dead-on face tracking with eyes is creating an accurate tracking plane. The best way to do this in a movable head without having to do a lot of math is to put tracking camera IN the eye. (Well, technically, you could put the camera between the eyes, but that is still …

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    Very nice design and build! I have a question at the very end if you want to skip the lengthy preamble. I build a lot of animatronics and robotics projects and have been looking for an eye mechanism to support a face tracking project in a head with tri-axial movement in the head and bi-directional movement the eyes. I've tried a couple of triaxial deisigns and have several working Inmoov heads, but most lack lids, require a faceplate or large support in the rear, and are not very flexible in terms of mounting. The key to dead-on face tracking with eyes is creating an accurate tracking plane. The best way to do this in a movable head without having to do a lot of math is to put tracking camera IN the eye. (Well, technically, you could put the camera between the eyes, but that is still prettty complicated and it tends to ruin the aesthetics.) It looks like your mech has a lot of pivot gear inside the eye but based on the percieved depth of the iris, there may be room for the tiny cameras I use. Do you think there is enough room beside/within the eye mech for a wire bundle totalling about 12 ga to snake out without being pinched? I'm sure I can modify the eye itself so the camera fits but am a little worried about the internal pivots and room for wires. Thanks. And super nice build!

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  • Porch-Swing Fire Pit

    If you scale don the design, you might be able to use 4x6 beams, but I would not recommend 4x4 beams for any beam that will hold a full sized person.

    Looks great!

    Hi, Thanks for pointing this out. I think the term lag bolts vs. lag screws may be a regional thing. When I look up lag bolts at the local big box, I get both machine lag bolts, and wood lag bolts, which you are calling screws. In this design, all of these fasteners are wood screw style except for the bench hangers, which are through-bolts with nuts and washers.

    These are screws, so the holes need to be smaller than the bolts.

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  • Another question... Technically, the small transducers are generating a sound pulse, but the actual "tractor" is caused by the moving air created by the sound, correct? I have seen acoustic devices that simply use a single speaker in a parabolic enclosure with holes carefully drilled into it to create small air jets, much like your 3-d printed reflector. The air then pulses through the small holes in a jet like fashion, probably producing a very similar air-movement, holding a foam ball in a similar way. The difference, I think is that your device uses much higher wavelengths and therefore keeps the held items very still. But the overall effect is the same. Does this make sense, or am I missing some concept that applies here? Thanks again for sharing your awesome pro…

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    Another question... Technically, the small transducers are generating a sound pulse, but the actual "tractor" is caused by the moving air created by the sound, correct? I have seen acoustic devices that simply use a single speaker in a parabolic enclosure with holes carefully drilled into it to create small air jets, much like your 3-d printed reflector. The air then pulses through the small holes in a jet like fashion, probably producing a very similar air-movement, holding a foam ball in a similar way. The difference, I think is that your device uses much higher wavelengths and therefore keeps the held items very still. But the overall effect is the same. Does this make sense, or am I missing some concept that applies here? Thanks again for sharing your awesome project!

    This is a ridiculously cool project and I love doing this type of thing, but I am afraid it will end up on my "finish eventually" shelf along with the 2 or 3 other projects that are there now. The optional tabletop "tube devices" repulsor beam device actually looks like a more practical thing that you could set on your desk. I'll put this on my wish list. I'm curious. What kind of sound is generated by the device?

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  • I updated the update and included a couple of pictures of the table along with some details about construction. I hope that helps!

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  • Hi Brian, The addition I made was just the a small table. I'll try to shoot another image or two and post it soon. Thank you for your interest!

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  • The posts are set in concrete which ends right below grade. There is 2b cut granite stone under the posts so any water should drain off with a minimum of contact. The concrete is sloped away from the posts to promote runoff. We have a very clay-like soil here and there is still some direct contact with the ground, so it is always possible that there will be some rot. The alternative would be to pour footers and anchor the posts above ground, but that would probably have a negative impact on the rigidity of the structure, requiring braces on each post. It's been 2 years now and the thing has held up very well, so rot is not something I'm going to worry about too much. For comparison, the swing set pictured in the project was 14 years old and several of the base timbers from that we…

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    The posts are set in concrete which ends right below grade. There is 2b cut granite stone under the posts so any water should drain off with a minimum of contact. The concrete is sloped away from the posts to promote runoff. We have a very clay-like soil here and there is still some direct contact with the ground, so it is always possible that there will be some rot. The alternative would be to pour footers and anchor the posts above ground, but that would probably have a negative impact on the rigidity of the structure, requiring braces on each post. It's been 2 years now and the thing has held up very well, so rot is not something I'm going to worry about too much. For comparison, the swing set pictured in the project was 14 years old and several of the base timbers from that were just buried in the dirt.. When I disassembled it, all the timbers looked pretty good and nothing had to be replaced.

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  • The beams are secured to the posts using 1/2 inch x 8 inch lag bolts. The deck screws are only for pulling the beams tight and securing the crossbraces.

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