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  • How to Use a Speed Square | the Basics

    In your article you said a 12:12 pitch is a 45° pitch. That being the case wouldn't a 6:12 pitch actually be a 22.5° pitch (I/2 of 45°) and not a 26.5° pitch? Or, am Imissing something?

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  • Skateboard Rack With LED Lighting

    Quick question. You mostly did such a nice job on your Skateboard Rack, but in the video, the back side looks complete unfinished, regarding staining, etc.I realize the 'back' won't be seen much, but due to 'pride in your project', I would have thought you would have wanted all sides of your rack to look the same and finished!The 'back side' just doesn't fit with the rest of you project.

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  • Design & Build a Truncated Icosidodecahedron!

    Michael,As an artistic endeavor, I can completely under!

    This project is interesting from a technical point of view, but is there a 'specific point' to this exercise that I may have missed?

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      • How NOT to Make a River Table (For Your Chair!)
  • If you didn't want the 'break' to show in your zeros, flip your zero 180°, and press it again.

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  • When I was a kid, my favorite "home-made" ice cream was, far and away, banana/walnut!We would chop the walnuts, and then added to my Mom's banana mixture. My Dad would throw all the ingredients in to our old "hand-crank" ice cream maker. He added ice and rock salt around the metal container that holds the ingredients, which was placed inside a larger wooden container, add the cranking handle on top, and them we would take turns cranking the crank. This usually took all of a about 20 minutes, to make the best ice cream I've ever tasted. There were some Saturday nights, if company was coming over, we would make two batches. The most popular favor was the banana/walnut. But sometimes, we would also make fresh strawberry, boysenberry, or peach. For some reason, we never ma…

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    When I was a kid, my favorite "home-made" ice cream was, far and away, banana/walnut!We would chop the walnuts, and then added to my Mom's banana mixture. My Dad would throw all the ingredients in to our old "hand-crank" ice cream maker. He added ice and rock salt around the metal container that holds the ingredients, which was placed inside a larger wooden container, add the cranking handle on top, and them we would take turns cranking the crank. This usually took all of a about 20 minutes, to make the best ice cream I've ever tasted. There were some Saturday nights, if company was coming over, we would make two batches. The most popular favor was the banana/walnut. But sometimes, we would also make fresh strawberry, boysenberry, or peach. For some reason, we never made chocolate or vanilla. Go figure.After reading this article, I remembered I have an old ice cream maker in the basement. I'm going to have to dig it out, try and find my Mom's 'old' recipe (her's was quite simple to prepare), and make some ice cream this week-end! Thinkin' about it, has already got my mouth watering!

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  • About a year ago, I order four, "credit card knifes" from survivallife.com. They advertise these knives as being free, but the catch was, you were asked to pay $2.95/ each, for shipping & handling.This website calls there knives: "Survival Card Knife". I gave a couple of these knives away to friends, kept one for my son and myself. (FYI: I checked their website, before including it in my comment.) The above "credit card knife" is great idea, but I also value my time. But, if you're a dyed in the wool, DIY'er, this a great project.

    Up-Date: 10 pack: Credit Card Knife Folding Blade Knife Pocket Mini Wallet Camping Outdoor Pocket Tools Folding Tactical Knife survival knife By XiboSold by: De Hong Yuan (seller profile)_________________________________________________________________________I found this seller on Amazon.com, just a few minutes ago, and bought 10 more "Credit Card Knives", to pass out to a few of my customers. Total Cost, including S&H, and Sales Tax: $7.58, or about $.76/each.If you don't have the time to make one, this appears to be a screamin' deal!

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      • How to Make an Electric Hydrofoil Surfboard
      • Build the Ultimate High Power LED Desk Lamp!
      • Make a Small Parts Organizer!
  • Love your sink/cabinet combo! Very well done.Now, for an unrelated question. Was the wall hung toilet a bugger to install?Thanks,Ji m

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  • I was thinking the same thing about a cutting mat, when I was watching your video.I have a "Staedtler" brand, 12" x 18", 1/8" thick, self-healing, cutting mat on my desk at all times. I'm always cutting on it with an Exacto knife, or a rotary knife. It works great.I looked up this size, and brand, on Amazon.com. It sells for $20.00 plus $5.49 for shipping. Also, take a look at some of the other brands, and types of mats. There's even a 16" x 16" mat, that has a rotating base, that might be quite handy in certain applications. On Amazon, I also watched a three minute video by "Howcast" called: "How to Use a Rotary Ruler & a Cutting Mat When Quilting". Even though it's about quilting, a lot of the information is appropriate, no mat…

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    I was thinking the same thing about a cutting mat, when I was watching your video.I have a "Staedtler" brand, 12" x 18", 1/8" thick, self-healing, cutting mat on my desk at all times. I'm always cutting on it with an Exacto knife, or a rotary knife. It works great.I looked up this size, and brand, on Amazon.com. It sells for $20.00 plus $5.49 for shipping. Also, take a look at some of the other brands, and types of mats. There's even a 16" x 16" mat, that has a rotating base, that might be quite handy in certain applications. On Amazon, I also watched a three minute video by "Howcast" called: "How to Use a Rotary Ruler & a Cutting Mat When Quilting". Even though it's about quilting, a lot of the information is appropriate, no matter whether you're cutting cloth, paper, cardboard, etc. The video host also demonstrates the "rotating base" mat mention above.Regarding your great video, the only other thing I wished you had shown, was your house lit up in a darker room, since it is a light.

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  • What exactly did you mean when you said "3D paper models is my goal".Not sure what a 3D paper model would look like. I'm interested.Thanks, Jim in Seattle

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  • Why not just "glass" the foam with an appropriate number of layers of fiberglass, and not use the plywood. I would think this might make the board lighter and easier to use. What do you consider the usefulness of the plywood to be, other than for rigidity?If you're concerned about stiffness, you could use a couple of plywood "stringers", placed lengthwise along the board. You could also drill holes in the stringers with a hole saw, with the holes spaced appropriately along the length of each stringer. These "stringer holes" would allow the resin to pass through, and help in bonding the stringers and the foam to each other.Not using the plywood on the top & bottom, would also allow you to do some additional "shaping" of the foam, prior to fiber-g…

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    Why not just "glass" the foam with an appropriate number of layers of fiberglass, and not use the plywood. I would think this might make the board lighter and easier to use. What do you consider the usefulness of the plywood to be, other than for rigidity?If you're concerned about stiffness, you could use a couple of plywood "stringers", placed lengthwise along the board. You could also drill holes in the stringers with a hole saw, with the holes spaced appropriately along the length of each stringer. These "stringer holes" would allow the resin to pass through, and help in bonding the stringers and the foam to each other.Not using the plywood on the top & bottom, would also allow you to do some additional "shaping" of the foam, prior to fiber-glassing the overall board.One last question: why did you use the "swallowtail" design for rear of the board, was it just for looks, or was there another reason?

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  • Nice looking table!My only concern would be, is how "tippy" is the table? Have you done any rudimentary testing to see how much weight the table can support, before tipping, when weight is placed at the opposite end of tabletop?I have designed (though not yet made) several cantilevered "coffee" and "end" tables. I would really like to find some informational guide lines, that would show the variables between the weight of a base, verses degrees of cantilever used, and distance from axis point to tipping point of a horizontal surface, with regards to the weight and angle used for a base. This type of information would be invaluable, when designing any kind of a cantilevered object.I have a couple more questions. How did you decide to use a 15° angle for yo…

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    Nice looking table!My only concern would be, is how "tippy" is the table? Have you done any rudimentary testing to see how much weight the table can support, before tipping, when weight is placed at the opposite end of tabletop?I have designed (though not yet made) several cantilevered "coffee" and "end" tables. I would really like to find some informational guide lines, that would show the variables between the weight of a base, verses degrees of cantilever used, and distance from axis point to tipping point of a horizontal surface, with regards to the weight and angle used for a base. This type of information would be invaluable, when designing any kind of a cantilevered object.I have a couple more questions. How did you decide to use a 15° angle for your base? Also why would you want to lighten the base with foam? I would have thought the heavier the base, the less likely it would tip forward. I have designed a couple of metal bases (.125" material), and I'm thinking of adding .25", or .375" ball bearings, to give the enclosed bases some additional weight for stability. Be interested in hearing your comments.Thank You,Jim DasherE.: rii.jed@gmail.com

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      • Spiral Staircase With a TON of Curves
      • Inlayed Wood Scales on Spiral Staircase
      • 3D Printed Light Bulb Shades
  • What would be the advantages of "structural sand using plastic or steel screen layers"?

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  • Great build!I have a couple of questions.1) Why not use a heavy-duty plastic bag to put your sand in. This would probably eliminate any problem with sand getting through the cracks, if you didn't want to use glue. A poly bag would also protect your wood from the dampness in the sand, which could cause future rot, and possible fungal growth.2) Why 2"x3"s, instead of 2"x4"? Five 2"x4"s would be 17 1/2" nominally, giving you a slightly larger base, which might be handy to have. This would also give a slightly larger inside area for your sand.

    Would a heavy-duty, steel, roller-type, wheel work? If used, I would think, any impact would basically be inconsequential?The only potential problem with this type of wheel/roller, is the floor would have to be fairly clean, so as not to impede rolling the stand to where it would be stored.

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  • That was a great idea to mention to read the comments. I found a comment where a hair dryer was used, inplace of an iron.

    Thanks,The "hair dryer" sounds great! I get steam on high settings with my iron, and not sure if that might adversely effect the outcome.

    I've also tried to remove spots with household beach (un-diluted) and had the same problem with the bleach actually deteriorating the fabric. Had to throw the cotton sweater away. Bummer!

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  • I've also seen this process used to increase shine.This process will make almost any stone that has been polished, to shine more, whether soft, medium, or hard.Although, what caught my eye, was your reference to jade, as being a "soft" stone. When carving most types of jade, you are usually required to use diamond impregnated grinding bits, and tools. And the way you actually get jade to polish to a high shine, is to heat the surface molecules to a point that they will actually begin to slightly melt, or flow. This would not be necessary in a "soft" stone.

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  • Would plywood door skins work well for this project? I think they're 1/8" or 3/16", 3-ply, if not mistaken. To allow the the door skin pieces to be easily attached, you could use multiple "partial" cuts through the side being attached to the frame. The best spacing for these cuts would take a little bit of figuring. I would think these "relief" cuts, would greatly assist in bending the door skin pieces to fit your framework. This method would also give you a "smooth" seat, with no segments. Enjoyed your article. Now, how about an "adult" version?

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  • Even if you kept measurements in tsp./Tbs./oz. would be great. Being user "friendly" is always a plus.By the way, they really look delicious!

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  • I thought the same thing on the end pieces, and the one continuous twine. I was thinking maybe every other row. (?) Maybe use leather instead of twine. Might be a little tougher, and I think I might like the look of leather better.Also like your idea of routing the edges.

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  • All you're getting with salt, is it's making your ice melt. This process is what makes your ice cream recipe freeze. Not sure what the thermal reaction is, but it works.

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  • British or not, if you feel the need to explain, it might not be that humorous.

    I'm going to try and make this out of an .030 ridged vinyl material, and use some type of velcro for fastening together. The velcro might allow me to make some "size" adjustments for different sizes of t-shirts, etc. I'm also going to radius the corners on each panel, to reduce the potential for snagging the shirt material. Also, decided to try and make it a "six" panel, using the center panel dimensions for each panel. A six panel, if assembled and hinged correctly, would make it easier to store away. When folded down, it would probably fit nicely in a standard dresser drawer.

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  • I guessing, soaking both sides of the material wouldn't be a bad approach.

    I guessing, soaking both sides of the material wouldn't be a bad approach.

    I guessing, soaking both sides of the material wouldn't be a bad approach.

    I guessing, soaking both sides of the material wouldn't be a bad approach.

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