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johnmather4444

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1Instructables44,946Views21CommentsBlackburn England
I've recently become an octogenarian, having enjoyed many DIY projects. I've greatly enjoyed designing and making a Model Garden Windmill and hope that it will inspire others to take up the challenge.

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Thank you for your kind comments. Why not keep things simple !John

    Thank you. I'm glad you like it. I love watching mine swivel as from one direction to another as the wind direction changes.

    Many thanks. I hadn't actually thought about the link between octogenarian and octagonal. Well spotted.John

    Vikki Many thanks for your appreciation of my project. In order to convert millimetres to inches, simply divide by 25.4 (or dividing by 25 is near enough) .An even easier way is to multiply by 4 and then divide by 100. Example 25.4 mm x 4 = 101.6 mm - then 101.6 divided by 100 = 1.016.Another example 180 mm x 4 /100 = 7.2 inchesAnother example, this time for a measurement in metres - first convert metres to millimetres by multiplying by 1000 0.6 m = 0.6 x 1000 mmm = 600 mm and then convert mm to inches as described above (ie x 4 / 100)600 mm x 4 / 100 = 24 inchesI hope this is helpful

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Many thanks for your kind comment. John

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Many thanks for pointing this out. I was not aware of this and I have to say that I didn't research the issue. In fact I simply assumed that a model windmill rotating in the clockwise direction when viewed from the front, would look 'right'! That is why I gave the ends of the Sail Attachment Bars a clockwise 'twist' when looking at the end of the Sail Attachment Bar. You will realise, however that when viewed from the front, my windmill will in fact rotate in an anticlockwise direction - provided the wind is predominantly coming from behind the windmill as opposed to blowing predominantly onto the front face of the windmill. Therefore, in order to make a model windmill operate like the true Dutch windmill, when the wind is blowing predominantly onto the front face of the windmill, the …

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    Many thanks for pointing this out. I was not aware of this and I have to say that I didn't research the issue. In fact I simply assumed that a model windmill rotating in the clockwise direction when viewed from the front, would look 'right'! That is why I gave the ends of the Sail Attachment Bars a clockwise 'twist' when looking at the end of the Sail Attachment Bar. You will realise, however that when viewed from the front, my windmill will in fact rotate in an anticlockwise direction - provided the wind is predominantly coming from behind the windmill as opposed to blowing predominantly onto the front face of the windmill. Therefore, in order to make a model windmill operate like the true Dutch windmill, when the wind is blowing predominantly onto the front face of the windmill, the twist of the ends of the Sail Attachment Bars needs to be in the opposite direction.Thanks again for pointing out the behaviour of Dutch windmills. John

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Thank you very much for for your very kind comment. I wish you success and the same enjoyment that I've had in making my windmills. John

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Thank you for taking the trouble to submit this comment. It hadn't occurred to me that it might be worth doing an 'Instructable' for the the saw cutting jig, but now that you put forward the idea, I can see that it may be of interest. Yes, there are probably many people like me, who don't have a circular saw and who rely on their eyes and acquired skills to make a reasonably perpendicular saw cut. I'll see if I can find time to put together a set of instructions and photographs. Thanks again. John

    Dennis Thank you for your comment. John

    Many thanks for your kind comments. Good luck with your windmill. John

    Thank you for your kind comment and I hope you are pleased with the metal version. Actually, I did make an octagonal sheet metal version myself, before making the timber windmills. I managed to do the eight 'folded bends' of the metal for the windmill tower, by hand, using short lengths of timber to clamp the sheet metal to create the 45 degree bend at each fold line. It was a bit tricky, but it worked OK. I did all the cutting of the sheet metal tower and the four sails by hand using a metal hacksaw blade held in my gloved hand !!! I did that a couple of years ago and that (all metal) windmill has been outdoors permanently and still runs as well as it did on the first day. Thanks again for your comment. John

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Thank you and I really appreciate your comment about your mum's love of windmills. A scaling up of about 10 to 1 would probably be OK. As yet, however, I have no plans to make one that large !!!! Thanks again.

    Thank you for your comments. Apologies about not including US dimensions but as someone has already responded, a simple way around that is to get a tape measure with both metric and US dimensions marked on it.

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Thank you for your comment. I'm delighted that you're going to try making one yourself. Best wishes. John

    Thank you for taking the trouble to comment. Yes, some LEDs sounds a good idea. John

    Thanks for your comment. You will obviously appreciate that some form of vertical axis is required to achieve the swivelling motion. If a windmill with just one set of sails (four sails not eight) was attached to a base board with for example a wood screw (but the screw not fully tightened) on the centre line of the tower, it would rotate if the wind was strong enough. But it would tend then to stay in that position, unless the screw was very slack.The double set of sails, together with bearings (almost frictionless) enables it to rotate very easily in a situation where the wind direction fluctuates. But if everything is totally symmetrical the chances are it would tend to oscillate rapidly in fluctuating wind direction conditions. In order to avoid this I decided to make one set of sai…

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    Thanks for your comment. You will obviously appreciate that some form of vertical axis is required to achieve the swivelling motion. If a windmill with just one set of sails (four sails not eight) was attached to a base board with for example a wood screw (but the screw not fully tightened) on the centre line of the tower, it would rotate if the wind was strong enough. But it would tend then to stay in that position, unless the screw was very slack.The double set of sails, together with bearings (almost frictionless) enables it to rotate very easily in a situation where the wind direction fluctuates. But if everything is totally symmetrical the chances are it would tend to oscillate rapidly in fluctuating wind direction conditions. In order to avoid this I decided to make one set of sails slightly shorter in length. (Probably changing the width instead of length would have the same effect.) It is of course the fluctuating wind direction that induces the swivelling motion, but the assymetrical feature of the sails is I think the factor which avoids the double set of sails windmill, spending most of its time swivelling about the vertical axis as opposed to doing this less frequently. Some further experimentation would serve to clarify this issue, as perhaps would some further 'brain power' !John

    Larry Thank you for your comments. My apologies - it didn't occur to me to add US dimensions. I'm sure you know that to convert mm into inches you need to divide by 25.4. My advice would be to divide each metric dimension by 25, which some people prefer to do by multiplying by 4 and then dividing by 100. So for example 39 mm becomes 39 x 4 = 156 and dividing by 100 gives 1.56 inches or approx (1 inch plus 9/16 inch). John

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  • DIY Timber Model Garden Windmill

    Penolopy Thank you for taking the trouble to comment. The double set of sails version really is worth the effort. Even when there's hardly any wind, but just a steady very low speed wind, it rotates well. The lighter the weight of the sails, the better. If I fitted wider sails the increased surface area would probably also help. I'm still learning !

    Gabriel Thank you for taking the trouble to comment so favourably. The double set of sails version really is worth the effort. Even when there's hardly any wind, but just a steady very low speed wind, it rotates well. The lighter the weight of the sails, the better. If I fitted wider sails the increased surface area would probably also help. I'm still learning ! As for additional projects, I don't have any more in mind. This is my first 'Instructable', stemming from my wife saying one day "John you could make a windmill for the garden". I have to admit it's taken many hours, but has helped to pass the time on during Coronavirus Lockdown ! John

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