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  • RADIANT FLOOR HYDRONIC (water) HEATING SYSTEM

    I can advise how I balanced my system which might help. I used mains pressure water, running to drain, to flush the air out, 1 zone at a time, then I ran all zones to drain in parallel and adjusted the zone flow valves until I had a similar flowrate showing on each flowmeter (these come as part of the manifold system). I had also designed my zones to have as similar a length of pipe as I possibly could to make balancing easier.

    I also installed my own system and congratulate you on a neat system. Mine differs in a couple of ways. I decided to reduce the thermal mass of mine (to reduce heat up time) so I only laid a 40mm slab, to do this I decided to reinforce it with chicken wire. There are a few micro cracks, but I will be laying a tile isolation mat to ensure these don't carry through to the tiled floor when I finally get around to it. We are living in the house and the system works great. I laid my own floor, in 1.5m wide strips using temporary edges to run a spreader bar along. The concrete was vibrated in using a hand held vibrator whilst being levelled.Also I have allowed for thermostats in a number of locations, with electrically controlled valve actuators as well as the pump start up to control it. All...

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    I also installed my own system and congratulate you on a neat system. Mine differs in a couple of ways. I decided to reduce the thermal mass of mine (to reduce heat up time) so I only laid a 40mm slab, to do this I decided to reinforce it with chicken wire. There are a few micro cracks, but I will be laying a tile isolation mat to ensure these don't carry through to the tiled floor when I finally get around to it. We are living in the house and the system works great. I laid my own floor, in 1.5m wide strips using temporary edges to run a spreader bar along. The concrete was vibrated in using a hand held vibrator whilst being levelled.Also I have allowed for thermostats in a number of locations, with electrically controlled valve actuators as well as the pump start up to control it. All dealt with by a control panel.My primary heat source is a wood burner stove with wrap around boiler. This heats up a thermal store like yours (by gravity feed), but I also have a thermostatic backup oil fired boiler that cuts in if the wood burner isn't running or isn't providing enough heat. The oil is typically only to keep the background temp overnight, provide our hot water requirements for showers in the morning, and any daytime running before we start the wood fire. I am in Scotland and we use around 2.5L of oil, and a basket of wood a day in the depth of winter. Based on usage this first winter a typical 1000L oil tank will I believe last us for two years between refills.

    It isn't off grid, but could be used that way. In the UK electricity is the heating source in a relative minority of homes. With the tax rate we have on base fuels, adding in that layer of inefficiency (conversion to electricity is less efficient than a direct use as a heat source) means most people use a direct fuel, such as gas (mains is preferred if available) or oil. Also we have little if any need for air conditioning as it rarely gets hot enough, so there is no need to take that aspect into consideration.I am surprised that the wood floor doesn't noticeably take longer to warm up. I presume you had the wood thoroughly seasoned before laying it, otherwise it would split. Engineered wood is less liable to splitting in that way, but perhaps that is what you have, it is still real woo...

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    It isn't off grid, but could be used that way. In the UK electricity is the heating source in a relative minority of homes. With the tax rate we have on base fuels, adding in that layer of inefficiency (conversion to electricity is less efficient than a direct use as a heat source) means most people use a direct fuel, such as gas (mains is preferred if available) or oil. Also we have little if any need for air conditioning as it rarely gets hot enough, so there is no need to take that aspect into consideration.I am surprised that the wood floor doesn't noticeably take longer to warm up. I presume you had the wood thoroughly seasoned before laying it, otherwise it would split. Engineered wood is less liable to splitting in that way, but perhaps that is what you have, it is still real wood.. ;)

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