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jwilliamsen

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22Instructables2,076,018Views269CommentsSalt Lake City Area (Utah)
I am a perpetual student, researcher, and hopelessly dedicated skill collector. I hope that you can find something inspiring or useful in the instructables I publish.

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  • Moai From Recycled Foam

    It doesn't really cure "glassy" - it's got a bit of flexibility to it when cured. It's actually easier to work with the cured PU than PVA glue. You could always stick a few pieces of foam together with it and see how it works. You could also get a feel for how much you need - i.e. nowhere near as much as PVA. If you were using the same amounts in the past (PVA=Polyurethane) then you were using too much polyurethane - and it has the nice tendency to fill gaps ;)

    Very cool and inspiring! :) I wonder if Polyurthane glue would have been a better choice than PVA? Polyurethane cures in the presence of moisture ... so just a damp rag wiped on the surfaces would work. Although you would have to contend with the expansion of the polyurethane glue, it does tend to stick everything to about everything else with proper surface prep - and it's imperveious to moisture after it cures.

    It does require a technique adjustment, for sure. You only use about 1/3rd the amount that you would use with a PVA glue, and it will foam up, but applying thinner coats can mitigate how much it swells. Clamping/strapping is also required. I use polyurethane glue almost exclusively any more because I love the strength of the bond, and the fact that it doesn't dull or gum-up tools or sandpaper - and tends to take finish pretty well, too. For keeping things aligned, you might consider using some straightened-out coathangers (or maybe 1/8" steel rods) pushed through the foam while it's curing, and remove them when the glue firms up (or maybe wait until the glue cures and then just give the coathanger "alignment pins" a quick twist to break them loose before removing them.…

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    It does require a technique adjustment, for sure. You only use about 1/3rd the amount that you would use with a PVA glue, and it will foam up, but applying thinner coats can mitigate how much it swells. Clamping/strapping is also required. I use polyurethane glue almost exclusively any more because I love the strength of the bond, and the fact that it doesn't dull or gum-up tools or sandpaper - and tends to take finish pretty well, too. For keeping things aligned, you might consider using some straightened-out coathangers (or maybe 1/8" steel rods) pushed through the foam while it's curing, and remove them when the glue firms up (or maybe wait until the glue cures and then just give the coathanger "alignment pins" a quick twist to break them loose before removing them. Anyway, it's awesome that we have so many materials and techniques to choose from :)

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  • jwilliamsen commented on douwe1230's instructable UV Curing Station
    UV Curing Station

    Very cool. Do you think you could add some UV strips under the turntable to help cure the bottom of the piece - or would the acrylic block too much of the UV light?

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  • Iconic CASIO F-91W Wall/Desk Size

    I actually had one of these ... great idea and execution!

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  • Custom Figurines: the Easiest Way to Model Your Favorite Characters

    I'll second the sentiment that Blender is an amazing piece of software. I'm a 29-year veteran of the CGI industry and it blows me away at what it is capable of. For those who are intending to 3D print out of Blender, there are addons that make the process go more smoothly - specifically in preparing your models for printing. One I would highly recommend is a modified version of the venerable 3D-Print Toolbox - called 3D-Print Toolbox Modified which you can download here: https://github.com/agapas/3d-print-toolbox-modifie... Look up on YouTube how to install and activate addons (it's super-easy).Also, for tips on how to sculpt, look up Zacharias Reinhardt and his CG Boost YouTube channels as well as his CG Boost website, and if you want to see what the future of Blender sculpting will…

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    I'll second the sentiment that Blender is an amazing piece of software. I'm a 29-year veteran of the CGI industry and it blows me away at what it is capable of. For those who are intending to 3D print out of Blender, there are addons that make the process go more smoothly - specifically in preparing your models for printing. One I would highly recommend is a modified version of the venerable 3D-Print Toolbox - called 3D-Print Toolbox Modified which you can download here: https://github.com/agapas/3d-print-toolbox-modifie... Look up on YouTube how to install and activate addons (it's super-easy).Also, for tips on how to sculpt, look up Zacharias Reinhardt and his CG Boost YouTube channels as well as his CG Boost website, and if you want to see what the future of Blender sculpting will bring, check out Pablo Dobarro's twitter feed. :)

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  • Easy to Make Modern Dog Bed

    If you look at antique bed frames as well as seating surfaces, they didn't use box-springs, webbing, or bands - they used slats. You still see this in some countries. Sometimes a slight bow was steamed into the slats to give a firmer "spring" and keep the center of the bed from drooping. What was old is new again! ;)If you ever build anything meant for long-term comfort - like a bed or a couch - you don't want to use a static support under your cushion - it's not comfortable. You would want to use springs or webbing (or slats). The exception to this is specifically-sculpted seating surfaces like you see with some antique rocking chairs, etc. A phenominal example would be Sam Maloof's master works.Keep up the good work!

    Nice! - and fits in well with any "people" furniture :) I could see kids invading and taking that over - lolWhether intentional or not, your decision to go with slats instead of a full panel was a good one. Solid panels generally make for very poor foundations for seating (or laying) surfaces. The individual slats allow for better "flex" and conform better to different weight distribution.

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  • Shy Mask That Shuts Up When It Sees People

    This is awesome - lol. A perfect example of the Slippery Slope of Design :)

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  •  FLOATING SHELF W/ EPOXY Inlay // CONCRETE Pegs

    Really attractive design!Something you may want to consider in the future - should you do another build like this - would be to use T-Nuts instead of threaded inserts. They would be quite a bit stronger and easier to install. Along with the main mounting through-hole, you'd want to drill about a 1/16" recess in the back of the base board with a Forstner bit to clear the flange of the T-Nut.Regardless, nice work! :)

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  • Super Comfy Dog Kennel Bed

    The thing about that joint design - with the two cross-braces - is that while you have more "leverage" over the stability of the joint, the connection is intrinsically weaker and prone to twisting - it will not stabilize the corner joint against twisting. If you were to glue and screw those braces into place, the joint would be still be fairly weak because you are gluing end-grain to long-grain - which is a very weak joint. Glue joints in wood, ideally, are long-grain to long-grain bonds which are much stronger. What you are looking for is bonded surface area - in which case, even a small-ish wedge in the corner would have more bonded surface area than the two-strut design. If you DO want more robust corners, a design like the one attached (using a section of 4x4 lumber) wou…

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    The thing about that joint design - with the two cross-braces - is that while you have more "leverage" over the stability of the joint, the connection is intrinsically weaker and prone to twisting - it will not stabilize the corner joint against twisting. If you were to glue and screw those braces into place, the joint would be still be fairly weak because you are gluing end-grain to long-grain - which is a very weak joint. Glue joints in wood, ideally, are long-grain to long-grain bonds which are much stronger. What you are looking for is bonded surface area - in which case, even a small-ish wedge in the corner would have more bonded surface area than the two-strut design. If you DO want more robust corners, a design like the one attached (using a section of 4x4 lumber) would be a good choice - just make sure to keep the grain orientation like what is shown in the attached image.

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  • Super Comfy Dog Kennel Bed

    Some beefy corner braces (possibly "table braces") would work, too. I just tend to use wood because it's strong, inexpensive, and usually there's scraps around that will work just fine. Just FYI, also have a preference for polyurethane glue - like Gorilla Glue - as opposed to yellow glue - because it's strong, bonds incredibly well, and is completely waterproof (just remember to dampen your joints before you glue up).

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  • Super Comfy Dog Kennel Bed

    Yes - if going with a "basket weave", adding supports in both directions would be a good idea, unless you are using a much more robust material like thick (5/4 or thicker) hardwood for your frame - and even then, I'd still recommend it. You may also want to glue some support blocks in the corners to reinforce the joint - can't hurt. Using a lap joint where the supports cross would be my recommendation, but you could probably get away with just butt-joints on the cross members if you don't want to go to that much effort (just remember: you won't care about the extra time you spent making lap joints 6 months from now - you'll care about how well-built the structure is, though).This bed is on it's third dog now - it outlived my last two - and yes, it's seen it's share of battle s…

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    Yes - if going with a "basket weave", adding supports in both directions would be a good idea, unless you are using a much more robust material like thick (5/4 or thicker) hardwood for your frame - and even then, I'd still recommend it. You may also want to glue some support blocks in the corners to reinforce the joint - can't hurt. Using a lap joint where the supports cross would be my recommendation, but you could probably get away with just butt-joints on the cross members if you don't want to go to that much effort (just remember: you won't care about the extra time you spent making lap joints 6 months from now - you'll care about how well-built the structure is, though).This bed is on it's third dog now - it outlived my last two - and yes, it's seen it's share of battle scars. Pretty much everything that can come out of a body has happened at one point or another, and when it does, you take it outside, hose it off, scrub it with some detergent, hose it off again, and let it dry. If you're using coated Cordura, the water won't get to the padding. If you're worried about odors, just sprinkle a generous layer of baking soda on it, let it set for an hour or two, and either rinse or vacuum it off. My newest rescue is a "shredder" when he gets frustrated, and while he hasn't done any noticeable damage to the bed (not for lack of trying) ... the same can't be said of my lawn, garden hose, lawnmower bag ... sigh ;)

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  • Super Comfy Dog Kennel Bed

    Given that your dog is significantly larger - and the bed would be larger as well, I would suggest a "basket weave" for the support webbing like in the attached image. You will want to make sure that you are pre-loading the webbing sufficiently so that it doesn't just sag under minimal weight (i.e. you have to stretch the webbing before stapling it down). You might want to do a complete basket weave with no spaces - which would allow you to use less pre-load (just a possibility). The only way to "test" it is to maybe attach a few rows, put your cushion on top of it, and then press down to see how much force it would take to bottom out - then take that information and multiply it times the number of support strips. You could also just stretch your supports (maybe mi…

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    Given that your dog is significantly larger - and the bed would be larger as well, I would suggest a "basket weave" for the support webbing like in the attached image. You will want to make sure that you are pre-loading the webbing sufficiently so that it doesn't just sag under minimal weight (i.e. you have to stretch the webbing before stapling it down). You might want to do a complete basket weave with no spaces - which would allow you to use less pre-load (just a possibility). The only way to "test" it is to maybe attach a few rows, put your cushion on top of it, and then press down to see how much force it would take to bottom out - then take that information and multiply it times the number of support strips. You could also just stretch your supports (maybe minimal spacing) along one axis, then test those strips to see if they give adequate support, and if not, start adding cross woven strips - i.e. add a center strip and test. Then two strips to either side and test, then keep adding as you need them.Remember, it's not the end of the world if it bottoms out in a few spots under focused weight - like standing - but you want it to support the dog fully when they are laying on it. It's also worth noting that if you add cross-weave, you will need to support the frame perpendicular to that axis as well. Even if you only put 20lbs of pre-load on each strip, if you have 15 of them, that's 300lbs of force that the frame has to deal with - not including the dog ;)Good luck! Just FYI, that same dog bed has been going strong all this time - it's holding up really well.

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  • Side Table From Scrap Offcuts

    These are very nice-looking tables, and I can appreciate the work that went into them....... and in the spirit of helping make them better, I would suggest changing the design. The way they are assembled now, seasonal changes in humidity (assuming you live where there are seasonal changes) will likely break up the tops of these tables. The problem lies in orienting grain from one board perpendicular to the grain of another. Wood grows across it's grain much more than it does along it's length, so, in a situation where you have end-grain glued to side/long grain (a very weak joint, I might add), those joints will fail due to the mis-matched expansion/contraction. In some cases, you might not have a problem if the perpendicular piece is small, made of denser wood, and "trapped"…

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    These are very nice-looking tables, and I can appreciate the work that went into them....... and in the spirit of helping make them better, I would suggest changing the design. The way they are assembled now, seasonal changes in humidity (assuming you live where there are seasonal changes) will likely break up the tops of these tables. The problem lies in orienting grain from one board perpendicular to the grain of another. Wood grows across it's grain much more than it does along it's length, so, in a situation where you have end-grain glued to side/long grain (a very weak joint, I might add), those joints will fail due to the mis-matched expansion/contraction. In some cases, you might not have a problem if the perpendicular piece is small, made of denser wood, and "trapped" in a sea of long-grain joints ... but that's a rare case.As someone else mentioned, this can be solved most easily by orienting all of your grain the same direction, and making sure that the wood expansion coefficient of the species (if you mix species) is pretty close. You can find wood expansion coefficients online. If you feel that you want to keep the perpendicular orientation, there are methods for stabilizing this. "Breadboarding" the joints would probably work, but IMHO not be worth the effort. You could use biscuits or a Domino to "spline" the top together, but would probably only be effective with smaller perpendicular slabs. You could also glue to a perpendicularly oriented substrate: Imagine splitting your table top thickness-wise, rotating the top piece 90 degrees, and gluing it back together. This would yeild a LOT of long-grain to long-grain glue surface and would stabilize the top quite a bit.Another solution (which would go counter to the idea of "solid wood") might be to glue veneers to a neutral substrate like MDF or possibly Baltic Birch plywood, then edge in a narrow band of solid wood.On the base: it's worth noting that you would want to drill oversized holes in the base parts to allow the screws some "slip" room. Again, the expansion and contraction of the top can loosen or break the screws if they are in holes that fit too closely. On commercial solid table tops, what you will typically see used (on medium-grade furniture) are "Figure 8" connectors that allow for movement - these would work for you as well :)I offer all of this in the spirit of helping you get better at your craft. I have made all of these mistakes in the past. I've watched furniture self-destruct because I didn't take wood expansion into account. Once you internalize the inherent strengths and weaknesses of wood, you will build stronger, lighter, and more durable furniture :) Keep up the good work!

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  • The Uncanny Valley: Robotics Art Lab

    It's fascinating that your students didn't find anything off-putting about the characters you mentioned ... perhaps it IS a generational thing. After all, young people today grew up with all manner of CGI - much of it guilty of the "uncanny valley" (at least to my eye). Even with all of the horsepower and talent behind Hollywood movies, characters like Thanos (from Avengers:Endgame) still don't quite sell as "real."As a professional CGI artist who has done a lot of character work, the interesting thing about the uncanny valley is that the closer you get to realistic, the worse it gets. The more detail you add, the more detail the eye expects, so it can become a vicious cycle: miss some detail, and suddenly it looks "off." Modern modeling/sculpting/texturi…

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    It's fascinating that your students didn't find anything off-putting about the characters you mentioned ... perhaps it IS a generational thing. After all, young people today grew up with all manner of CGI - much of it guilty of the "uncanny valley" (at least to my eye). Even with all of the horsepower and talent behind Hollywood movies, characters like Thanos (from Avengers:Endgame) still don't quite sell as "real."As a professional CGI artist who has done a lot of character work, the interesting thing about the uncanny valley is that the closer you get to realistic, the worse it gets. The more detail you add, the more detail the eye expects, so it can become a vicious cycle: miss some detail, and suddenly it looks "off." Modern modeling/sculpting/texturing techniques and vast improvements in rendering technology have made a huge difference in believability, but until robots and CGI can reliably reproduce all of the micro-expressions we're used to seeing as humans, stylization is going to be the way to go IMO.

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  • Not a thing (except for added complexity). I have several firearms with folding stocks, and I've built a folding stock for an M1A, and when you need something compact and maneuverable, folding stocks are hard to beat. This rifle, however, is more of a target rifle, so a folding stock would be overkill.

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  • VERY cool. My first thought ... after soaking up the amazing attention to detail is: How do you keep it from getting dusty? lol I'd have that thing hermetically sealed.

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  • Thanks! I'm glad you like them!

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  • I have to wonder what the effect of an aluminum alloy has on the overall properties of the finished DIY Aluminum Bronze. It's pretty hard to find pure aluminum - most of what's out there is an alloy (7075, 6061, 2036, etc, etc). Still, a very interesting project :)A better test of brittleness might be to see if you can bend it without breaking it. Clamp it in a vise and see if you can bend it (or break it) with an adjustable wrench as a handle :)

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  • jwilliamsen commented on Scoobie8739's instructable Entryway Bench

    Barring some kind of disaster - natural or otherwise - that bench should be around longer than you (or me).An idea for dealing with squeeze out: 1) Dry assemble/align your joint, 2) apply wide masking or painter's tape across the seam, 3) slit the tape with a razor blade along the seam - separating the parts 4) wet-assemble your joints and clamp. The tape will keep the squeeze-out from bonding to the wood along the seams, and make whatever does squeeze out easier to clean up. That way, you don't have to worry about glue-starving your joints to prevent a mess ;)You might also consider polyurethane glue (like Gorilla Glue) as it doesn't repel stain like aliphatic resins (yellow glues), and tends to be stronger and not prone to swelling or creep.

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  • Good stuff. Projects are all about learning - making mistakes is part of the mix (no pun intended). For a parting compound, wax would work better (like a Johnson's Paste Wax or even Paraffin). Also, whenever you have a deep mold like that, you're going to want to add at least a *little* draft angle to make removing the mold a lot easier and less risky. You did a good job getting the mold out without breaking the sink - but it didn't look like fun at all ;)

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  • Probably the easiest way to make a wooden chair that's comfortable to sit on - lots of curves. That's a great use for an old barrel.

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  • Hi Patricia,Iodized salt (as well as non-iodized salt) will work.

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  • In regards to your breadboard ends: You might be able to get away with what you did depending on how dramatic the humidity difference between seasons is in your area, but in the future, you might want to elongate your dowel holes in the tongue of the joint - all but the center hole. Specifically, you want to put a pin in the center of the table end (no hole elongation) and then elongate the holes on either side - maybe 1/16" to each side of center (it's OK to glue the center like you did). This allows the center pin to keep the board centered (duh) and then allows the table top to grow and shrink across it's width without putting undue stress on the breadboard ends. This is important because wood expands/contracts across it's grain significantly more than it does along it's lengt…

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    In regards to your breadboard ends: You might be able to get away with what you did depending on how dramatic the humidity difference between seasons is in your area, but in the future, you might want to elongate your dowel holes in the tongue of the joint - all but the center hole. Specifically, you want to put a pin in the center of the table end (no hole elongation) and then elongate the holes on either side - maybe 1/16" to each side of center (it's OK to glue the center like you did). This allows the center pin to keep the board centered (duh) and then allows the table top to grow and shrink across it's width without putting undue stress on the breadboard ends. This is important because wood expands/contracts across it's grain significantly more than it does along it's length, so when you have a joint where end grain meets side grain (as in your breadboard ends) NOT taking this into account can mean that your project disassembles itself - or at least becomes "rickety" as the expansion/contraction cycle loosens the joint. The amount of growth you can expect is determined by wood species, initial moisture content of the wood, and humidity change across seasons. There are online references you can check to see how much you would want to elongate those holes.In regards to flattening the top, another technique would be take a pencil (soft lead) and lightly draw some big lazy squiggles across the top - enough so that there is a line every few inches. Then, use either a jointer plane or a belt sander to flatten the top until the squiggles are gone. The lines give you a reference to what is high and what is low - and when you are finished in a particular area. With the jointer plane, you want to stroke at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood, and with a belt sander, you want to keep the sander flat on it's platen (don't let it tilt and dig in) and use wide, arcing, sideways sweeps with very light pressure - again at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood - never let the sander start or stop when in contact with the surface. In both cases, finish with light sanding with either a belt sander, linear sander, or by hand, stroking in the direction of the grain. Palm sanders can leave swirls.When finishing (staining) softwoods, you will get better results by "conditioning" the wood before using the stain. Softwoods are like sponges - irregular sponges - and will have areas that totally suck up stain (like end-grain) and other areas that don't take it well at all. This leads to a "blotchy" finish instead of a nice overall color. Conditioning solutions can be purchased or home-made - I've had good results with both - and they are definitely worth the time and effort. Remember: Few people notice a perfect finish - only the imperfect finish stands out ;)Finally, a word on glues: You might want to do some experimenting with polyurethane glue instead of aliphatic resin (wood) glue. Polyurethane glues require a slightly different work flow, but since switching to polyurethane about 15 years ago, I can't see going back. I use aliphatic glues for some things (like biscuit joints) - but not very often. Polyurethane glues actually harden (aliphatic resins remain "liquid"), poly takes stain like wood (no bright areas where the stain wouldn't bond to the glue lines), poly doesn't dull tools or gum up sandpaper, poly is waterproof and can fill minor gaps. My favorite brand, so far, is Gorilla Glue.At any rate, I really appreciate your willingness to share your hard-earned lessons. I KNOW how much effort goes into making videos like that - so kudos for that. Woodworking is a journey, not a destination - we are all students - and it's awesome when we share what we know to help everyone on the same path get better at doing what we love.

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  • Agreed. Unfortunately, I came to the same conclusion when looking at the design (i.e. it's probably going to disassemble itself). The one possible saving grace is if relative humidity is *very* stable throughout the year and/or the wood is sealed *very* thoroughly (as with a catalyzed urethane).Wood grows across it's grain much more than along it's grain. If the center of the table was allowed to 'float' in the frame (a tongue and groove assembly) and had provisions for expansion/contraction where the ends interface with the frame, it would probably be fine, but as this appears to be built there might be some mysteriously loud popping sounds as the weather changes ...It certainly is a pretty table with some nice attention to details, though ;)

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  • jwilliamsen commented on jcbuchli's instructable Cedar Strip Kayak

    Outstanding work - really beautiful. It's kind of a paradox, though: too beautiful to use ... and too cool NOT to use - lol. Great job - some very nice attention to detail there :)

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  • jwilliamsen commented on barclay5426's instructable Sculpted Oak Sofa

    Nice work! It takes a lot of focus to power through all that hand work.If you ever decide to do that kind of sculpting work again, you might want to look into a tool called the "Holey Galahad" from King Arthur Tools. Combined with your angle grinder, they can remove a lot of material very quickly and allow for a lot of finesse work. You would still want to sneak up on your final shape by hand, but for bulk stock removal with a lot of control, they are really hard to beat ;)

    Yes, they are not inexpensive. I, too, balked at their price when I originally bought mine - but - they are very tough and last a long time. I've had the two I originally purchased - for about the same price they go for now - for over 10 years and they're still going strong. It's easy to mentally compare them to something like a sanding disc - but that wouldn't be an accurate comparison because they do not wear like any abrasive disc I've ever seen or used - they seem to be perpetually sharp. The key - as with most metal tools - is to not overheat them with use - let the "wicked little carbine cones" do their thing without a lot of force and they will last.

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  • It's worth noting that if you want to write off part of your house as an "office" that the space you are using probably needs to be *just* an office - i.e. not a "multi-purpose" room like a "nursery *and* an office in one!" If that is the case (a dedicated office space) you can write off that percentage of your total floor space (as you mentioned) for utilities. If you work remotely, and depend on the internet to do your work, you can pretty much write off most or all of your internet expenses as well.

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  • Nice table! Some serious investment in that top - walnut isn't cheap (at least not in my neck of the woods). Congratulations on being one of the few builds I've seen that takes the difference in wood expansion (width vs. length) into account.A few things you may want to consider should you ever do another table of similar design: 1) Use one of the online wood-expansion calculators to determine how much your top will / could expand, and use that dimension to determine how much "slip" to add to your tenon slots. It's also worth noting that the tenon slots toward middle of the table don't need to be very wide - maybe Pin Dia +1/8th inch - and the slots will get progressively wider toward the outer edges of the table - up to a bit more than half of the total expansion you could e…

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    Nice table! Some serious investment in that top - walnut isn't cheap (at least not in my neck of the woods). Congratulations on being one of the few builds I've seen that takes the difference in wood expansion (width vs. length) into account.A few things you may want to consider should you ever do another table of similar design: 1) Use one of the online wood-expansion calculators to determine how much your top will / could expand, and use that dimension to determine how much "slip" to add to your tenon slots. It's also worth noting that the tenon slots toward middle of the table don't need to be very wide - maybe Pin Dia +1/8th inch - and the slots will get progressively wider toward the outer edges of the table - up to a bit more than half of the total expansion you could expect across the whole top. 2) Mirror clips will probably work, but might prove to be a bit flimsy over time. There are some heavy-duty clips available for attaching a table-top - they're thicker and the metal is stronger than your average mirror bracket. 3) Aliphatic resin glue (yellow glues) remain "liquid" over time and can swell / move - especially in stressed laminations. You probably won't have any issues, but the glue seams can end up "proud" of the table surface depending on the conditions the table is subject to (moisture and heat). You might want to check out polyurethane glue (Gorilla is my go-to brand) - it's stronger, fully cures, fills gaps, and doesn't dull tools or gum up sandpaper. I rarely use yellow glue any more.4) When applying paint to wood, it's a really good idea to use a primer first. Most paints don't really bond well to bare wood. The primer acts as an interface between the wood and the paint. Again, you may not have any problems, but priming is a way to significantly reduce the possibility of the paint peeling/flaking/cracking (the type of primer will be determined by what the paint manufacturer recommends).Don't take this as criticism - it's not. It's information I've gathered over years of woodworking (and learning how to do things better) that I thought might be useful to you in the future ;)Again, nice table .... it will probably be around longer than we will :)

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  • That is bizarre - that you can't find this kind of mechanism in Germany(!). Are bi-fold doors not a common thing in Europe? Have you tried eBay or Amazon? Another possibility would be to contact an interior designer or architect and ask them where they would source something like that - or - contact one of the companies like http://bifold-hardware.com/bi-fold-systems/dewall-...and ask them if they might know where to get a more "consumer" grade hardware set.

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  • jwilliamsen's instructable Make Your Vise Portable's weekly stats:
    • Make Your Vise Portable
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      1 comments
  • REALLY impressive - wow. Truly stunning work.(Why do I get the feeling that staircase cost more than my house? ;)

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  • jwilliamsen commented on bearkat_wood's instructable Walnut Cafe Chair

    Very nice! I see a *little* Sam Maloof influence in there ;)

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  • Most wooden stocks used for center-fire rifles use at least one cross-bolt behind the recoil lug and almost every semi-auto center-fire rifle I've seen uses a metal liner for the stock (M-14, M-1 Garand, SKS, etc). Semi-auto center-fire can be pretty punishing on a wooden stock unless the recoil impulse is spread out and not focused in one area. While a stock without those things might hold up for a few hundred rounds, I would think that breakage would almost be a given without a cross-bolt / stock liner. As far as bonding the polymer stock to the wood, I would put that in the "sketchy" category for a couple of reasons. First, if your stock is glass-filled nylon, there's not a lot of readily available adhesives that will work trying to glue it to itself - let alone to wood. …

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    Most wooden stocks used for center-fire rifles use at least one cross-bolt behind the recoil lug and almost every semi-auto center-fire rifle I've seen uses a metal liner for the stock (M-14, M-1 Garand, SKS, etc). Semi-auto center-fire can be pretty punishing on a wooden stock unless the recoil impulse is spread out and not focused in one area. While a stock without those things might hold up for a few hundred rounds, I would think that breakage would almost be a given without a cross-bolt / stock liner. As far as bonding the polymer stock to the wood, I would put that in the "sketchy" category for a couple of reasons. First, if your stock is glass-filled nylon, there's not a lot of readily available adhesives that will work trying to glue it to itself - let alone to wood. Second, you would be bonding two materials with very different rates of expansion in response to both temperature and moisture - meaning that in the best case, your adhesive would have to be flexible in order for them to not split apart due to something like a change in season or temperature. Add to that a bit of pounding recoil and I wouldn't bet on that bond holding up (I believe your intuition is correct)..If it were me, I would look for a donor wooden stock to use as the core of the custom stock and either sell the polymer stock to offset the cost of a wooden one, or just put it in the closet and save it for conditions that you don't want to put your custom wooden stock through. I've seen (wooden) SKS stocks around for $20-$40 in really good condition (on Gunbroker.com), so, I'd wager you could find some beaters (ugly, but solid) for less from one of the bulk surplus import shops. Bonding wood to wood is a much better way to go, the donor SKS stock would have the liner and the hardware, and your finishing process would be more consistent as well. My $.02 ;)Good Luck - let me know how it goes :)

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  • For your slider surface/magnet shield, you might want to consider UHMW or Delrin sheet - they're self-lubricating and tend to resist getting gummy with friction. You'd have to double-face tape it on since I'm not aware of glue that would work. Check with your local sign shop to see if they might have some in their scrap bin - you might get lucky and get what you need for free.

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  • That looks really nice! I'll bet it gets a lot of attention at the range (and elsewhere). Cool thing about rattle-can paint jobs is that should you ever decide to change them, it's pretty easy to do :)

    Please do! I'd love to see what you come up with :)

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  • Dyeman,Very interesting. Where did you source the Coosa board? I'd never heard of it until you mentioned it. How hard is it to work with?I've been looking for a .22LR 7-2 (I have two 22WMR's) but the very few I've found that are new are $1K+ - so not exactly an impulse buy ... and a far cry from the $250 they originally fetched. Supply and demand, I guess ;)

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  • No, it's not really necessary - it just needs to be strong and long enough to keep the jamb from being splintered. The rail I put in is 36" long with some pretty stout screws holding it in place. The bigger danger at this point is that the lockset would pivot under force and split out the door - but that's where the NightLock comes into play ;)http://www.ebay.com/itm/Door-Barricade-Brace-The-NIGHTLOCK-Security-Lock-BRUSHED-NICKEL-FINISH-/161603961825?hash=item25a058c3e1:g:Hq0AAOxy4dNS7P~7

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  • Hey Dyeman,That is one sweet-looking Rusky Gun! I'll bet you get a million questions at the range :)Did you make your buttstock hardware or did you find a place to source it from? Is that carbon over wood or foam? Carbon fiber is amazing stuff, isn't it? Crazy how stiff those thin parts can be. I recently threaded the barrel on my BB and have been running a Spectre II can, but .22WMR is a *little* louder than .22LR :) On an aesthetic note, you might want to find some nice thumb-wheels for those cheek-piece mounting studs - but that minor niggle aside - great job! Very impressive! I have a second BB in .22WMR that I'm thinking I want to build an ultra-light stock for ... I'm thinking foam-core and carbon fiber - you may just have inspired ME - lol

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  • "Dope" is slang for "excellent, cool, or very good"

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