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  • Insulating a Floor Underneath the Crawlspace

    I suspect that insulating on top of the floor and leaving the under portion could create an issue with moisture and mold as your heat transfer would be taking place within the wood floor itself, vs insulating at the bottoms of the beams and the skirting would work well. You are correct about the ceiling and walls being more important though. Could skip the floor until further along and get by for a while with just well insulated skirting.Personally my approach for insulating that floor would be slightly different. I would take the entire sheets and attach them to the bottoms of the beams using screws with washer heads to affix the foam. That or remove the interior floor and do the same, but use the spray in insulation to affix the sheet to the bottoms of the beams. I suppose you could a...

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    I suspect that insulating on top of the floor and leaving the under portion could create an issue with moisture and mold as your heat transfer would be taking place within the wood floor itself, vs insulating at the bottoms of the beams and the skirting would work well. You are correct about the ceiling and walls being more important though. Could skip the floor until further along and get by for a while with just well insulated skirting.Personally my approach for insulating that floor would be slightly different. I would take the entire sheets and attach them to the bottoms of the beams using screws with washer heads to affix the foam. That or remove the interior floor and do the same, but use the spray in insulation to affix the sheet to the bottoms of the beams. I suppose you could also do it in strips and use stringers to allow the foam to settle between the beams at the lowest point and seal the sides and ends with sprayfoam. Problem with that is while it creates a dead air space it also uses an excess amount of spray foam, involves far more cutting and is a loss in efficiency as the wood with it's poor R value will still pass the cold through as the foam is only between the beams and not covering them.On a different note Foam with the radiant sheething is really quite nice for this kind of thing. I think it's R-Max? They sell it at my local HDepot

    Depending on the size of the joists she could put foam between them and seal it to the joists themselves with the spray foam. Venting would have to be added to the ridge and to the soffit, but it's doable. I did this on a single-wide that I replaced the roof on and it worked quite well. I thought the poor R value of the joists would come back to haunt me but it's been over 6 years with some pretty brutal winters and hot summers and haven't had any problems.

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  • Install iJDMTOY 2013-15 Nissan Altima LED Daytime Running Light

    Seems like an ad to me as well. The other instructables are pretty much the same, linking back to the ijdm store.

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  • Inexpensive DIY Under-Cabinet Lighting

    I haven't heard anyone mention this yet but I am planning on sub lighting the base of the cabinets as well, so the floor is well illuminated. Also thinking about doing this in the bedroom to light around the bed so it is easier to see when coming into bed during the night.

    I don't think I fully understood how you want to do that.You want to connect the motion sensor to an existing 110v outlet? / Or is it an existing light socket?There are a couple of options depending on what you want to do. If you want to plug into a standard wall outlet you could extend it with a small cord into a project box where your motion sensor switch is, and outputs to an outlet mounted in the same box, then plug the inverter into that box. This would provide you a moveable solution, but binds everything to that box.If you are using a light socket that is no longer used for something else you could replace your light switch with a motion sensor like this onehttp://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-180-Degree-Pir-...and then replace the socket itself with an outlet, or one of those old...

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    I don't think I fully understood how you want to do that.You want to connect the motion sensor to an existing 110v outlet? / Or is it an existing light socket?There are a couple of options depending on what you want to do. If you want to plug into a standard wall outlet you could extend it with a small cord into a project box where your motion sensor switch is, and outputs to an outlet mounted in the same box, then plug the inverter into that box. This would provide you a moveable solution, but binds everything to that box.If you are using a light socket that is no longer used for something else you could replace your light switch with a motion sensor like this onehttp://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-180-Degree-Pir-...and then replace the socket itself with an outlet, or one of those old adapters that spins into the light-socket and gives you prongs for a plugin, then you would plug your inverter in there. That switch could also work in the project box as well.If you don't have a replaceable switch that controls the light socket you could also run the invertor directly off of the socket, and then put a 12v motion sensor after the inverter.https://www.amazon.com/Sensky-BS010W-Motion-Distan... The downside to this design is that the inverter would be on all the time which would probably decrease its lifespan and generate heat.

    So something like thishttps://www.amazon.com/Westek-MLC4BC-Indoor-Activa...or maybe this if you want the motion sensor separatehttps://www.amazon.com/Westek-MLC12BC-4-Indoor-Act...plug your inverter into that and your good to go.I personally would desire the one with the separate motion sensor that way you can use a more concealed outlet and just put the motion sensor in a more visible location. You could also focus the sensory area by pointing the sensor through a tube if desired.

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  • kris256 commented on davidandora's instructable Upgrade Your Refrigerator Lighting3 years ago
    Upgrade Your Refrigerator Lighting

    I actually ran across a guy that took a chest freezer to make the kind of thing you are talking about. He essentially just setup a thermostat that controlled the power to the freezer, and set it to fridge temps. Since it was a chest freezer the cold air can't drop. It is albeit a bit of an ugly setup, but should be pretty efficient when it comes to preventing cold air loss.

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  • Inexpensive DIY Under-Cabinet Lighting

    I realize that your question has already been answered, but I thought I would mention that I have done this with a number of my old power inverters sitting around. For the most part all of the leds I have had are 12v so the only thing I have had to watch for is the amps. It seems pretty realistic to run about 20-30ft of the led light strips on a 3amp or less 12v inverter. The strips I use are very similar to these https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Daylight-Non-wate...The only notable difference with the "waterproof" ones is that they have a pliable tube that wraps around them the full length, I personally prefer the non-waterproof ones because they have the double-sided sticky tape on the back.As a side-note I would highly recommend plugging the inverter into an outlet that is ...

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    I realize that your question has already been answered, but I thought I would mention that I have done this with a number of my old power inverters sitting around. For the most part all of the leds I have had are 12v so the only thing I have had to watch for is the amps. It seems pretty realistic to run about 20-30ft of the led light strips on a 3amp or less 12v inverter. The strips I use are very similar to these https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Daylight-Non-wate...The only notable difference with the "waterproof" ones is that they have a pliable tube that wraps around them the full length, I personally prefer the non-waterproof ones because they have the double-sided sticky tape on the back.As a side-note I would highly recommend plugging the inverter into an outlet that is ran by a motion sensing switch, I did this on my kitchen and it is fantastic. When you enter the room you will hear the motion sensing switch click, and about 1 second later the lights are on, stay on for about 3 minutes (with motion) and then turn of automatically. I did the motion sensor as a 110v normal switch with a standard 110v outlet that powers up the inverter, That way the inverter wasn't powered up all the time just to operate a 12v motion sensor.

    The set I installed at my last place are still going fine and they were installed 7 years ago. Hope that helps.

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