author
34Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Achievements

  • labdude commented on Messi732's instructable Arduino Hands-free Buzzer
    Arduino Hands-free Buzzer

    I read through your code, and it made me think - have you tried to do anthing with doppler sensing to detect speed? You send out an 8 pulse 'chirp' if you know the freq of the chirp, and can determine the frequency of the return, you can tell if something is moving closer or farther away, and mathematically derive the speed as well. Might be a fun exercise...

    Sweet! Many Thanks.

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on Messi732's instructable Arduino Hands-free Buzzer
    Arduino Hands-free Buzzer

    So, I read through your description, but without a thorough examination of the code (difficult, because it was flattened and unformatted), I can't figure out why you need two distance sensors? BTW, I'am experimenting with an Arduino myself, but haven't gotten to working with the ultrasonic sensor yet. Can you suggest any good motivating exercises (besides measuring the distance to household construction eg. walls, hallways etc.)

    View Instructable »
  • Simple Manual Star Tracker for Astrophotography

    Gotcha. ABS is certainly much stronger than PLA. For some reason, it looked like you were printing parallel to the hot shoe.

    View Instructable »
  • Simple Manual Star Tracker for Astrophotography

    Love the idea of using the phone's instruments. I didn't even thik of that. My device isn't 'rooted', so I can't try it out, but it is a very good idea. Next time I try my instrument apps, I'll check and see if it is indeed compensated. With GPS/GLONASS positioning, I can think of no reason why they can't build that in. After all, the positional accuracy is almost certainly more than your mount would require. As an aside - how sturdy is your l]hot shoe-laser mount? In what direction is the 'grain' of the material? I'd like to try it out, but I think I'll use so-called 'tough PLA' - it reduce the risk of fracturing, which is a concern, given the relatively small footprint of the mount.

    View Instructable »
  • 3D Printed Articulated Tripod

    Brilliant! Well designed and executed. Thanks for sharing.

    View Instructable »
  • Simple Manual Star Tracker for Astrophotography

    For a couple of bucks, you can buy one of these:https://www.harborfreight.com/dial-gauge-angle-finder-34214.htmlThis will let you (relatively) accurately set the elevation (altitude) angle of your mount. Maybe not as useful in the Northern Hemisphere, where Polaris is visible, but *really* handy in the Southern Hemisphere, where it most definitely is not. Simply elevate your mount until the indicator points to the angle equal to your latitude. There are some places (such as star parties) where green lasers are actively discouraged, as well. Even a brief flash of a green laser can competely ruin a well-planned and painstakingly executed astrophotograph. Be kind, be courteous, be prepared. Afterthought: Having an inexpensive compass might be handy (check it BEFORE mounting your camera!)…

    see more »

    For a couple of bucks, you can buy one of these:https://www.harborfreight.com/dial-gauge-angle-finder-34214.htmlThis will let you (relatively) accurately set the elevation (altitude) angle of your mount. Maybe not as useful in the Northern Hemisphere, where Polaris is visible, but *really* handy in the Southern Hemisphere, where it most definitely is not. Simply elevate your mount until the indicator points to the angle equal to your latitude. There are some places (such as star parties) where green lasers are actively discouraged, as well. Even a brief flash of a green laser can competely ruin a well-planned and painstakingly executed astrophotograph. Be kind, be courteous, be prepared. Afterthought: Having an inexpensive compass might be handy (check it BEFORE mounting your camera!) to locate your Azimuth - just remember to account for local compass deviation (difference between Magnetic and True North or South).

    View Instructable »
  • Wet Molded Credit Card Wallet

    Not saying it's better - just that it worked for me. The more information people have, the better it works for all of us.

    View Instructable »
  • Wet Molded Credit Card Wallet

    Good reason. I've done this with wood molds, and the results were much better than I expected. I also went without an outside mold, opting to use staples on the scrap area. Again, much better than I expected it would come out. I made a binocular case...

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on SimonRob's instructable Equatorial Mount for DSLR
    Equatorial Mount for DSLR

    The quality of your long exposures will be related to how precisely you can align your mount to Polaris. Adjusting the vertical elevation angle of your tripod is critical - the closer you can get this to your latitude the better your exposures will be. If you have one of these: https://www.harborfreight.com/dial-gauge-angle-finder-34214.htmlYou can align it to your counterweight rod, and set the angle to your latitude (make sure to you are reading the angle correctly); it will make adjusting your elevation that much more precise.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/687361-REG/Oben_BD_0_BD_0_TABLE_TOP_BALL.htmlFor the ball mount attachment, use a 1/4"x20 TPI screw or bolt. That is a universal screw thread for nearly everything photo related until you move up to the bigger stuff.

    Try B&H Photo (if you are in the US). I've ordered lenses and accessories form them and they are reasonably priced and ship fast (from NYC) https://www.bhphotovideo.com/If you are outside the US, Sorry, I can't help you - shipping outside the country has become problematic.

    Nice work. I'd like to make one of these myself. I've been considering how to 3D print a sector gear to make a 'barn door' style tracking mount, but htis is easier.

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on epicfail48's instructable Resin Stabilizing Wood
    Resin Stabilizing Wood

    Please contact Turntex Woodworks. Curtis will ship to the EU.The resin can be reused again and again. Limiting factor is time - once the catalyst is mixed in, the resin has a finite lifespan, about 6 months to a year.

    If you can seal it, you can use it, but it needs to be glass - plastic will collapse under vacuum. Cactus Juice is available in different quantities, so the larger your container, the more you may need.

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on constantM1's instructable Chain Clock
    Chain Clock

    Might I suggest marking the back board between the 'West' and 'East' * positions such that the relative position of the Hour numeral indicates the number of minutes?If you start with 0 minutes at the 'East' and 60 at the 'West', you can subdivide the arc into 4 or 12 Sectors to indicate 15 or 5 minute intervals. Ages ago, when I was in Vienna, I saw a linear clock like yours that spanned an alley. The span was divided into 12 (I think) divisions, and it took one hour for one of 12 figures, each carrying a placard showing the hour, to traverse from one side to the other. Looking it up, I found the Ankeruhr Clock. I can't imagine that htere are that many of these around...

    View Instructable »
  • Wonderful work, artfully realized and beautifully executed. I had one suggestion however. I was thinking that your numbering system for the elements could be replaced by using a single byte, with one bit for each element, eg. Kick = 1 (b0000 0001), snare1 = 2 (b0000 0010), HiHat = 4 (b0000 0100) then Kick & HiHat = 5 (b0000 0101), kick and snare = 3 (b0000 0011) etc.You can reduce your storage requirements by using byte vs int (more room for tracks) and set up additional elements in the same amount of storage. Or use the High bit (b1000 0000) as your "previous" flag. This would also simplify your code by allowing you to do bitwise logic to select your instruments eg: "// we check if in this cycle a snare has to be played if ( (cycleNumber == 9) || (cycle…

    see more »

    Wonderful work, artfully realized and beautifully executed. I had one suggestion however. I was thinking that your numbering system for the elements could be replaced by using a single byte, with one bit for each element, eg. Kick = 1 (b0000 0001), snare1 = 2 (b0000 0010), HiHat = 4 (b0000 0100) then Kick & HiHat = 5 (b0000 0101), kick and snare = 3 (b0000 0011) etc.You can reduce your storage requirements by using byte vs int (more room for tracks) and set up additional elements in the same amount of storage. Or use the High bit (b1000 0000) as your "previous" flag. This would also simplify your code by allowing you to do bitwise logic to select your instruments eg: "// we check if in this cycle a snare has to be played if ( (cycleNumber == 9) || (cycleNumber == 4) || (cycleNumber == 6) || (cycleNumber == 1) ) "can be replaced by: byte snare = 2; (in setup) then " if (cycleNumber & snare) {your code here}"or, by the same token, digitalWrite(SnarePin, cycleNumber & snare); //make snare output highAgain, it would save you a lot of storage, allowing more instruments or more tracks, etc. But these are the sorts of things you learn from experience...

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on FredericM's instructable Reuse Old Laptop Webcam

    Not necessarily, Slash. Often, the first thing that happens is the +5 goes to a voltage regulator to bump the V+down to say, 3.3V or so. IF you see two wires to ground or to each other, consider that one may be a shield.

    View Instructable »
  • Awesome job - I'm envious. I'd love to try one of these sometime. Check out www.woodgears.ca . Matthias has a gear calculator, and a program (for sale) that will calculate and print full-size gear patterns. He also has a bunch of videos demonstrating wooden gear making and a ton of cool projects he's built with wooden gears.Also, regarding the AC synchronous motors - when I was a kid, I learned an old trick for noisy motors. Most of these motors are sealed, and contain grease, which, over time collects in the bottom of the motor housing. If your motor starts to get real noisy, take it out (if you can) and rotate it 180 degrees and run the motor for a few hours before putting it back. If your design permits, you might even be able to rotate the motor in place.

    View Instructable »
  • You need to look into so called match solder - lo temp solder that will melt from the heat of a lighter. Also available are solder/shrink connectors - bits of heat shrink tube with a solder preform inside. put one of these over two pieces of wire to be spliced, and heat. The solder melts, and the tube shrinks, soldering the wires and sealing the joint. Amazon has them : https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01ILSEDWI/ref=asc_df_B0...I learned about these from my mechanic!

    View Instructable »
  • Well, you noted that CFM is a measure of flow, and while meaningless for vacuum, it does bear on how fast it will pump down to a desired level. Add while 27 inches may not be a great vacuum, for many applications it is perfectly acceptable. We are not all trying to simulate deep space, or build a tokamak; for home science experiments, or stabilizing/dyeing wood blanks, 27 in/Hg is just fine.I'd be more concerned about repeated use without proper cooling/lubrication. My understanding was that many A/C refrigerants have a lubricating component - or maybe was that mostly for auto A/C, I haven't messed with that since they used real Freon.

    View Instructable »
  • labdude commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Easy Table Saw Sled

    Nice work!I'd like to add that most calipers have a fourth mode of measure - called "step". The left edge of the jaws are ground coplanar to each other at 'zero'. If you place the caliper such that the left edge of the fixed jaw is square to your reference surface, you can measure the height of a feature with the edge of the moving jaw. You could, for example, measure the depth of your miter slots this way. The depth rod is good for inside depth, the 'step' is good for outside measurement.

    View Instructable »
  • I work in a professional electronics lab. My coworkers run the gamut from surgical-suite clean to tornado victim disorganized. Because we often work on highly restricted projects AND have frequent visitors, one particular coworker intentionally keeps his bench SO disorganized it is impossible for a casual observer to know exactly what he is working on.

    View Instructable »