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make-it-mike

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11CommentsRight here at my desk, are ye blind?

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  • Turn on the Laptop With the Lid Closed

    Holy crackers, I had no idea I was replying to 3-year-old post. Oh well, gonna leave it, maybe it'll inform someone else who's interested.

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  • That is ASTOUNDING! I have NEVER seen a knife, constructed of any material whatsoever, that could UN-SLICE cheese like that!! (kidding of course!!). Cool project!

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  • Glad you found it useful. I tend to be wordy! I love Instructables too, just wish I had more time for doing more projects!

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  • Sure! The idea is to have the clutch stop applying torque to the screw until it reaches the depth you want, then break loose and stop driving. The setting will vary depending on the type and length of screw, as well as the density of the wood (or other material) into which it's being driven. So, to find the right clutch setting, set it at a low number and drive a screw. If it lets go too soon, start adjusting it upward until you find the right setting to have it stop driving when it reaches the depth you want. This might be exactly flush, or a bit "proud" (sticking out) or counter-sunk (driven below the surface of the wood/material), depending what you want to achieve. For example, sometimes I use the driver to do most of the work, but leave the screw "proud" when…

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    Sure! The idea is to have the clutch stop applying torque to the screw until it reaches the depth you want, then break loose and stop driving. The setting will vary depending on the type and length of screw, as well as the density of the wood (or other material) into which it's being driven. So, to find the right clutch setting, set it at a low number and drive a screw. If it lets go too soon, start adjusting it upward until you find the right setting to have it stop driving when it reaches the depth you want. This might be exactly flush, or a bit "proud" (sticking out) or counter-sunk (driven below the surface of the wood/material), depending what you want to achieve. For example, sometimes I use the driver to do most of the work, but leave the screw "proud" when I want to finish up by hand -- getting it to an precise depth using a manual screwdriver and great care. I drill-driver is a great tool, but not always a subtle one. :-)An extra note: Often, if you want to reverse the drill-driver to back a screw out, you'll have to increase the clutch setting just a bit, so it can overcome the friction of the driven fastener. Otherwise it may just release every time, and not back out the screw. Better to try once and succeed, because multiple attempts increase the chance of cam-out, damaging the screw.Who knew there was so much to driving screws, eh? Have fun drivin' 'em in!

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  • When you're turning the screwdriver, and the driver's edges ride up and out of the screw's head, that's known as "cam out." It's a pain the butt, and usually makes the situation worse by further wearing down any remaining, clean edges in the screw head.If you've ever driven a drywall screw into hardwood with a power drill-driver, with the clutch set too aggressively, you'll be sure to have experienced this many times! The drive bit will protest and rattle loudly, as it is forced out of, and back into, the screw head repeatedly. Nyarrrrgh!! Screw heads aside, I've even wrecked a few drive bits that way -- and those are hardened.

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  • I'm with you. What possible downside could there be to making the markings easier to read??!? Any manager/supervisor worth their salt should welcome ANY cost-effective way to improve efficiency. When the marking is done with a bit of care, IMHO the tools will even look BETTER than they did before... as well as being more useful. There's just no figuring some people. *SMH*

    That is wicked cool lookin'!

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  • make-it-mike commented on tomatoskins's instructable Custom Tool Wall

    What a fantastic Instructable! Great job! Tool organization is a huge challenge in my small workshop. It's an epic, eternal battle for between storage density and accessibility that I suppose I will be waging for my entire life. Some of the ideas presented here are going into practice in my own shop, ASAP!Someday I expect I will have a larger shop, but then, I'll probably just acquire more tools and be right back where I started! Hah!

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  • There's nothing quite like reading about a guy who builds his own LSM, to give my swollen ego a nice, healthy smackdown. Awesome project!

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