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mephit

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  • Over Sized Skeleton Breaking Out of My Home

    As both a native Memphian and someone with a good friend who has been able to live to her late 30s (so far!) thanks to the childhood cancer treatments she received at St. Jude, thank you for your generous support of one of the best things we have in this city!

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  • No-Fail Metal Plating With Kitchen Chemistry

    Thank you! Oddly enough, no, I'm not in any kind of metal business at all. I'm actually a graphic designer! I did, though, grow up around metalworking of almost every kind (mainly blacksmithing but also including foundrywork, fabrication, jewelry-making, and machining). I also studied chemistry in school and have specifically researched plating for of some personal projects, so I have some at least decent knowledge of the matter. Not near as much hands-on experience as you, though! Let me also include my kudos for the excellent 'Ible! Extremely useful info and well presented. Thanks for sharing it!

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  • No-Fail Metal Plating With Kitchen Chemistry

    Generally, when replating objects you first have to remove the remaining original plating. Once the original begins wearing/flaking off, it leaves microscopic gaps between the base metal and the edges of the remaining plate. You can't ever completely remove these voids so if you plate over them it will tend to fail early in those spots.Also, your original plating is almost certainly chrome. It's much better at resisting high temperatures than nickel, and more corrosion resistant to boot. I've never heard of anyone successfully plating nickel (or anything else) over chrome. You could probably get the nickel to lay down a coat, but it wouldn't be electrochemically bonded to the chrome surface like usual plating so it would almost certainly start peeling off almost immediately. Chrome is so …

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    Generally, when replating objects you first have to remove the remaining original plating. Once the original begins wearing/flaking off, it leaves microscopic gaps between the base metal and the edges of the remaining plate. You can't ever completely remove these voids so if you plate over them it will tend to fail early in those spots.Also, your original plating is almost certainly chrome. It's much better at resisting high temperatures than nickel, and more corrosion resistant to boot. I've never heard of anyone successfully plating nickel (or anything else) over chrome. You could probably get the nickel to lay down a coat, but it wouldn't be electrochemically bonded to the chrome surface like usual plating so it would almost certainly start peeling off almost immediately. Chrome is so non-reactive that I don't think anything will really stick to it long term.

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  • mephit commented on Andersenleather's instructable Leather Music Bag

    The simple fact is, you probably can't. You might find enough for twice that, but even then you'll have to search. Leather just isn't that cheap.

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