author
92Commentsthe other Washington
retired hardware store owner
  • Tee Slot Drill Press Clamps, Easy and Quick

    If you're only ever going to use the clamps with your drill press, as shown, this design is OK. But setting & removing roll pins is kind of a pain in the butt. I would use bolts & nuts instead.The idea is great, though!

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  • Perfect Cast Iron Campfire Pizza

    Should also be able to do this in a charcoal grill. Get a chimney of charcoal burning good and follow all directions here, except for the fire source.Good looking pizzas, BTW!

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  • mikecz commented on knife141's instructable Leatherman Tool Case
    Leatherman Tool Case

    Nice job.I wish you had shown it with a belt loop instead of a bianchi clip, tho. I lost a Gerber multi tool a few years ago because the seemingly well attached bianchi clip on the sheath actually let go somewhere and the $60 tool was lost!

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  • Starting a Scrap Garden

    I've been saving and growing heirloom tomato seeds for years. Rather than using a cup to rinse the seeds after you take them out of the tomato, use a 6-12 ounce jar with a screw on lid. Put the seeds and "jelly" in the jar, fill it about half way with cool to tepid water, put the lid on & shake the heck out of it for 15-20 seconds. Carefully pour off the water, add more water & do it again until you have just clean seeds in the jar. If you're gonna save the seeds for next year, let the seeds and jelly ferment (yeah, actually get moldy!) before starting the rinse procedure. Dry thoroughly (a week or so) before storing for next spring planting.

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  • Polishing Cast Engine Parts and Dressing Up a Tatty Old Engine

    Aren't you worried about your oil lines fatiguing off at the compression fittings? Most automotive fittings on flexible tubing (even steel brake lines, for instance) use flared fittings. I owned a hardware store for 30 years (& worked in it for years before that when Dad owned it) and saw several cases of compression fatigue breaks in basically static plumbing situations. You're on an engine which is constantly vibrating. ???

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  • Making a Stonewashed Kitchen Knife Out of 1095 Steel

    Loved the idea in step 37 to reinforce ANY sandpaper with packaging tape so you can "shoeshine" sand an irregular shape. This hint can & will be used in many projects in the future.Oh, nice knife, too!

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  • mikecz commented on liquidhandwash's instructable Rat Rod Rescue
    Rat Rod Rescue

    How dare you call an early eighties Toyota PU a "rat rod"! My faithful '81 with a 23R engine lasted me for 37 years. In all that time only "major" repair was to put a clutch in it! You got a fancy one, tho - push button radio tuning! Loved that truck - it was also faded yellow in color😊

    How dare you call an early eighties Toyota PU a "rat rod"! My faithful '81 with a 23R engine lasted me for 37 years. In all that time only "major" repair was to put a clutch in it! You got a fancy one, tho - push button radio tuning! Loved that truck - it was also faded yellow in color😊

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  • Nice and Cheap Cooking Bell Lid or Melting Dome for the Plancha and the BBQ

    It will add a little to the cost, but if you don't have a lathe you can buy various size and shape wood knobs at your hardware store or home center.

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  • I have neither the skills nor access to the equipment you had for this project. Nonetheless I read with great interest your entire instructable. Your text, photos, and SKETCHES are all OUTSTANDING! I never realized how complicated a tandoor oven is, but your sketches in step 4 clearly show the "inner workings" of this device. You were really smart to build this while you had access to the studio and shop at school. Was this maybe a senior project? Whatever... it was very well done!

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  • For those reading in USA (& Canada?) T65 is high protein "bread" flourT550 is pretty much an "all purpose" flourHope this helps!

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  • OUTSTANDING article! Nice explanations of some of the "tricks of the trade"!

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  • And the approximate cost of this project was....?

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  • OUTSTANDING! There should be more teachers like you who care this much!

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  • I was thinking the same thing about how the set screw would slowly ding up the threads on the adjusting bolt - and thought using extra nuts, as you suggest, would solve the problem!

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  • Since I about never go anywhere without it, I carry an extra car key and house key in my wallet!

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  • Almost always charcoal briquettes. They burn more consistently (especially Kingsford "blue bag" briquettes - most serious BBQ forum people use this fuel over all others because of its wide availability and consistent burn rate.) Yeah, it produces more ash than many other products, but, again, it is reliable and widely available - especially important for traveling competition BBQers and therefore something to seriously consider even for the occasional backyard griller.

    This fuse method of laying your charcoal also works great for ANY low & slow cook. For ribs, you'll probably burn only half the fuse and a pretty big pork butt/shoulder might use about 3/4 of full circle fuse. A full packer cut brisket will require you to pull out the meat (probably put it in a picnic cooler) and set up another fuse and then return the meat to the grill.You don't need to soak your wood. By the time the fuse gets 1/4 to 1/3 of the way around the circle, the wood is dried out anyway. In the low oxygen environment of a kettle cooker with the vents almost closed, dry wood chunks just smolder anyway.The bimetallic thermometers mounted in most grill are notoriously inaccurate, I think mostly because of the placement near the top of the grill cover. Remember, heat rises, so …

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    This fuse method of laying your charcoal also works great for ANY low & slow cook. For ribs, you'll probably burn only half the fuse and a pretty big pork butt/shoulder might use about 3/4 of full circle fuse. A full packer cut brisket will require you to pull out the meat (probably put it in a picnic cooler) and set up another fuse and then return the meat to the grill.You don't need to soak your wood. By the time the fuse gets 1/4 to 1/3 of the way around the circle, the wood is dried out anyway. In the low oxygen environment of a kettle cooker with the vents almost closed, dry wood chunks just smolder anyway.The bimetallic thermometers mounted in most grill are notoriously inaccurate, I think mostly because of the placement near the top of the grill cover. Remember, heat rises, so the temp just under the dome is higher than anywhere else but just above the coals. I moved mine down fairly near the bottom edge of my Weber's cover - so it is near the level of the food. I plugged the original hole with a short stainless steel bolt, washer, & nut. Or use a probe-on-wire thermometer & feed it thru the top vent - kind of a pain in the butt but makes temp control easier than feeding the wire between the bowl & cover of the grill, causing an air leak.Nice instructable.

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  • Alright, a couple more questions. Why does this only work with 3/4" and 1" pipe, especially since 3/4" has 11 threads per inch and 1" has 8 threads per inch? Also, what if you're not working with a 90° fitting, such as a 45° elbow, or a coupling, or a motor or pump housing, or an electrical box, or...? I truly am not trying to start a flame war here. It's just that I owned a hardware store for 30 years and threaded pipe most of those days and while I worked for my dad for years before that. I've cut & threaded 150 pieces of pipe in one day (yeah, special ordered & used up fifty 21 foot pieces of pipe!) I've helped thousands of customers figure out how long the pieces need to be to work for their project, often with VERY little room for error. You just have to …

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    Alright, a couple more questions. Why does this only work with 3/4" and 1" pipe, especially since 3/4" has 11 threads per inch and 1" has 8 threads per inch? Also, what if you're not working with a 90° fitting, such as a 45° elbow, or a coupling, or a motor or pump housing, or an electrical box, or...? I truly am not trying to start a flame war here. It's just that I owned a hardware store for 30 years and threaded pipe most of those days and while I worked for my dad for years before that. I've cut & threaded 150 pieces of pipe in one day (yeah, special ordered & used up fifty 21 foot pieces of pipe!) I've helped thousands of customers figure out how long the pieces need to be to work for their project, often with VERY little room for error. You just have to know the "rules" for figuring the takeup.

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  • I'm sorry, but your hint for BLACK THREADED STEEL makes no sense to me at all.

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  • If you’re only doing a few leaves, a lot of deli or bakery containers are plenty big for propagating like this and they are FREE!

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  • mikecz commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater

    Instead of the white bucket, use a dark one, or an old fashioned enameled canning kettle or lobster/clam steamer. The dark container heats faster & to higher temperature and you don't need the secondary black lid inside it. You still need the smaller container to catch your distilled water, of course.

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  • mikecz commented on Paige Russell's instructable Sun-Dried Tomatoes

    Some vacuum sealers for plastic bags and tubes have an attachment that lets you vacuum seal "mason" jars. Do you think this process would help for long term storage of these dried tomatoes?

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  • Totally agree with using vise grips if there is even the slightest part of the screw sticking up above the material. I have even used vise grips on several types of pan head screws that were supposedly "non-removable" or that needed a special security driver to remove (& install). As long as there is room to get at the screw or bolt with vise grips, you're either gonna get it out or shear it off!

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  • Your old style dutch OVEN with legs on the bottom and a dished down cover to put more coals above whatever you're cooking will absolutely work for this and similar recipes! That was the whole idea of it - to provide an oven-like cooking environment under primitive conditions. Remember that, until the 1800's when wood and coal burning kitchen "ranges" became available with built in ovens, an oven was, almost world wide, a large brick or stone community built and maintained thing. The Dutch oven like yours gave pioneers, hunters, trappers, homesteaders, and cowboys (amoungst others) a way to boil, braise, stew, and BAKE foods. Still works!

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  • A 5 qt. or larger cast iron chicken fryer works just as well as the Dutch oven. You could also use a baking stone or pizza stone or baking steel, but your loaf will be flatter. Cheapest way is to "pave" your oven rack with a 2 x 2 or 2 x 3 grid of 6" quarry tiles - those reddish brown tiles often seen in public restrooms and commercial kitchens, and use these as a makeshift baking stone.

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  • mikecz commented on gravityisweak's instructable Coat Hanger Drill Bit

    What could possibly go wrong? I've broken several 1/8" x 6" drill bits (which are kind of expensive) on various projects. I've also done this wire-as-a-drill several times to make sure of where I was going to come out on the other side of a wall or a finished ceiling WITHOUT breaking the wire. It works quite a bit better than one would think!

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  • mikecz commented on eccuste's instructable Daddy's Pickled Jalapenos

    Love these on pizza, quesadillas, some tacos and sandwiches!Didn't realize how easy to make them myself. I guess I'll have to grow more jalapenos next year!

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  • mikecz commented on inspiretomake's instructable Meteorite Ring

    THAT is one crazy fine piece of work!

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  • This seems a rather pain-in-the-butt way to do it. Why not just "bump" start it? It's much safer (you're in the driver's seat controlling the steering wheel and pedals) and you don't have to get out the jack, jack the thing up, find a long enough strong enough rope to do this, & hope you have the strength (I'd like to see you do this on a full sized pickup or SUV with, say, a 6 liter engine).As a proof-of-concept --- just barely acceptable. As a working solution --- NO!

    Agreed. You need one or the other. A gasoline engine car will usually run a few miles (in the summer, without headlights on - I've done it.) on a decently charged battery with a dead alternator or indefinitely on a working alternator but a dead battery.

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  • I've been fishing for 60-some years and don't understand your "feathers" lures. Are these flies, such as fly fishermen use? ...or something more basic? One of your photos shows an obvious weight on the end of your line with (I guess) several of your feathers strung above it. Could you please show a closer view of these feather lures and are they attached directly to the main line, or are they on "droppers" a little off the main line?Thank you.

    Ah, thanks, Tecwyn. I've never seen a rig quite like that. Do you also put any kind of bait on the hooks, or is the bit of red color plus the tail feathers enough?

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  • Most of the common ornamental or "street" shade trees will produce fine charcoal (or firewood), as long as they haven't been sprayed with any pesticides for at least several years. Most nut and fruit trees will also work very well. Check out BBQ Web sites to see what people are suing for their "smoke" woods for cooking (or ask about it). Any BBQ wood will be safe and suitable for making charcoal to prepare food over.I have a pretty good "stash" of sugar maple from our yard and white oak from a parkway near our house that I use in our BBQ.

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  • The percent users of gas(propane vs charcoal grillers are, of course, for USA users (and, by the way, I can hardly stand the concept of gas grills). I'm a little dubious about all poisonous substances in woods being "volatiles", but maybe. You comments are interesting, to be sure.I certainly have to agree with "jsawyer", below, who states that charcoal is a lot easier to get and keep an even temperature on than wood. Cooking over wood is definitely more of an adventure! I do it partially because we have several large hard maple trees in our yard and it seems just often enough to keep me in fuel, a large branch blows down or my wife wants another one cut off because it's shading her flowers too much! We've lived in this house for more than 30 years and have never spraye…

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    The percent users of gas(propane vs charcoal grillers are, of course, for USA users (and, by the way, I can hardly stand the concept of gas grills). I'm a little dubious about all poisonous substances in woods being "volatiles", but maybe. You comments are interesting, to be sure.I certainly have to agree with "jsawyer", below, who states that charcoal is a lot easier to get and keep an even temperature on than wood. Cooking over wood is definitely more of an adventure! I do it partially because we have several large hard maple trees in our yard and it seems just often enough to keep me in fuel, a large branch blows down or my wife wants another one cut off because it's shading her flowers too much! We've lived in this house for more than 30 years and have never sprayed the trees with any kind of pesticide, so I'm not worried about issues like that in the maple wood.

    Amongst other things, Fahrenheit 451 was about burning books, because 451° F is generally considered to be the flash point of paper, which is somewhat different from that of wood, even tho most paper is made completely or mostly of wood fibers.

    Amongst other things, Fahrenheit 451 was about burning books, because 451° F is generally considered to be the flash point of paper, which is somewhat different from that of wood, even tho most paper is made completely or mostly of wood fibers.

    Amongst other things, Fahrenheit 451 was about burning books, because 451° F is generally considered to be the flash point of paper, which is somewhat different from that of wood, even tho most paper is made completely or mostly of wood fibers.

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  • Uh, the numbers being kicked around nowadays suggest that about 70% of home grillers use a gas (usually propane) grill, about 30% use charcoal, and the under 1% of us use wood for outdoor cooking. I'm pretty sure MANY more meals have been prepared throughout history (and pre-history, for that matter) on indoor and outdoor WOOD fires than on charcoal burning devices! As some others have stated in the comments for this instructible, there certainly are poisonous woods that should not be used for cooking, and I'm pretty sure if you turned them into charcoal by the method shown here, the charcoal would STILL be poisonous! Wood burners unite!

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  • mikecz commented on tomatoskins's instructable Perfect Workbench

    You will appreciate MANY times that you built your bench slightly lower than your table saw's table! (Like, every time you start cutting up a full or nearly full sheet of heavy panel product or any even sort of long rip cut on regular lumber!)As for finishing, I covered mine with a piece of "sacrificial" tempered hardboard ("Masonite") tacked down with some 1" brads. I did that about 30 years ago and still haven't replaced the first sheet of hardboard.

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  • mikecz commented on Elias Stratakos's instructable Wall Tool Holders

    Nice, as far as it goes. How about pliers (& cutters/strippers that look kind of like pliers) and hammers?

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