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mimaki cg60

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7Instructables707,409Views52CommentsEstados Unidos
Interests include wood working, wood burning, drawing, graphic design, and Biology.

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10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Mind for Design
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Mind for Design
Burn It! Contest
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Burn It! Contest
Papercraft Contest
Contest Winner Fourth Prize in the Papercraft Contest
  • Making Beer Tankards on the Lathe

    Thanks for the tip! I'll keep it in mind for future projects (sadly I had to move and sell my lathe). Good luck with your first mugs and happy turning!

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  • Hollowing the piece is in my opinion the toughest part or at least the one I struggles with the most. In some cases a fingernail gouge works very well but it does take more skill for this application. A square edge scraper works well for me but it demands frequent sharpening on my cheap chisel. Another option that might be rather unorthodox is using the tip of a skew chisel, which also means it will get dull pretty fast. I always take my time with this part as catches are pretty easy to happen on blind turnings, specially when you get deeper into the mug when there is more distance between the tool rest and the tip of the chisel.

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  • Yes, you can still use the same techniques! The main difference will be the quicker cooldown of the tip as you work, but you can do amazing woodburning with a simple tool!

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  • About wood toxicity, not many pose inherent danger of food contact poisoning. Once cut and dried, many of the toxins present in the sap will denature and no longer induce the same effect. Mostly, different woods will cause allergic reaction or sensitization differently in each individual. The following website has some explanation and a list of species-to-symptom reports http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/wood-al...Advantage of stave construction versus solid core hollowing aside from aesthetics: For me is mainly availability (not every lumber store will have big blocks of exotic hardwood) and then there is the wood I'm not wasting by already having a big hole on the inside. It might be stronger as well, maybe.

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    • Making Beer Tankards on the Lathe
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  • Thank you!. True, i missed that one trying to get this done in time for the contest (didn't help me much though haha).On the mahogany/walnut mug I glued a bottom and then turned both as one piece.The other ones I turned a tight fit plug for the bottom as you can see on the 4th picture of step 5. I prefer this latter method because I feel it's easier to hand sand the deeper part of the mug through the other side

    Thank you for all the compliments!Birdsmouth has actually been present in my failed attempts from before I any angle cutting saw, I thought I could do it with a flute router bit but alas I'm not very good in creating jigs.I seems fairly straightforward to cut it on the tablesaw but it takes precision on the height adjustment so that no gaps are visible on the endgrain.I still feel like giving it a shot though on account of the extra support it provides and I do have a project in mind that uses no glue, only natural beeswax and pine rosin as a sealer. I might buy a birdsmouth router bit for that though.

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  • Your words are deeply appreciated!

    Your words are deeply appreciated1

    Thanks you! I'm glad you got inspired =)

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  • Thank you! Dimensions of the Game of Thrones inspired mugs are 5-1/2'' tall and about 4-1/4'' base diameter. Or 14cm by 11cm. Thickness of the lumber was 20mm or a little under 3/4''

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  • It looks awesome! Great job!Lord of the Rings projects are so fun to make :D

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  • Thank you! I'll love to see it :)

    Hello and thank you! Here is the link for the shading tip I use, although they may come in many different shapes: http://www.woodburning.com/toolshop/detail.asp?iPr...You did some great pieces! Your line work is amazing. I'm assuming you are used to drawing, since your burned art seems so natural :DI still haven't tried beech, although I recently fell in love with mahogany for the same reasons you stated. I was never able to put so much detail into a piece before! As for pine, I'll admit the grain is a nuisance; sadly, sanding might not help much in this case. My latest work on pine had very hard areas, so I had to work very slowly.On the bright side, a drawing using mostly lines, even for shading, will not show much of the difference you feel between soft and hard areas. A gradient shadi…

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    Hello and thank you! Here is the link for the shading tip I use, although they may come in many different shapes: http://www.woodburning.com/toolshop/detail.asp?iPr...You did some great pieces! Your line work is amazing. I'm assuming you are used to drawing, since your burned art seems so natural :DI still haven't tried beech, although I recently fell in love with mahogany for the same reasons you stated. I was never able to put so much detail into a piece before! As for pine, I'll admit the grain is a nuisance; sadly, sanding might not help much in this case. My latest work on pine had very hard areas, so I had to work very slowly.On the bright side, a drawing using mostly lines, even for shading, will not show much of the difference you feel between soft and hard areas. A gradient shading will be harder to make uniform.(I can't believe I'm helping a Slytherin... what will my fellow Ravenclaws say?)

    I'll love to see it! Thank you :)

    Hi there! Thank you for the suggestions. You have a good point.Hatching is a technique of shading by drawing parallel lines in a determined area. You may cross many layers in different directions to create more depth. It's often used in comic books.On your second point, I might not have a wide range of suggestions on the cheaper burner. I made the jump from the Walmart-bought one to the professional tool after a few weeks of woodburning. But my main advice is to keep the tips clean with a high grit sandpaper or a wire brush, even as you work, as their tips tend to accumulate more residues than finer ones. Also, give the burner time to re-heat between strokes, since it tends to lose heat rather quickly. The drawing and shading techniques don't really change from a hobby to a professional t…

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    Hi there! Thank you for the suggestions. You have a good point.Hatching is a technique of shading by drawing parallel lines in a determined area. You may cross many layers in different directions to create more depth. It's often used in comic books.On your second point, I might not have a wide range of suggestions on the cheaper burner. I made the jump from the Walmart-bought one to the professional tool after a few weeks of woodburning. But my main advice is to keep the tips clean with a high grit sandpaper or a wire brush, even as you work, as their tips tend to accumulate more residues than finer ones. Also, give the burner time to re-heat between strokes, since it tends to lose heat rather quickly. The drawing and shading techniques don't really change from a hobby to a professional tool, the process just becomes faster.The idea of silicone tape is great! I sometimes use band-aids on my fingers when I need to burn for longer periods with the hobby burner, even though I'm holding it at the "right" place. It really cooks your hand! Does the grip feel clumsy because of the weight of the burner, when you hold it close to the tip?Thanks again and let me know if you have more questions or suggestions :)

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