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mrstan

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5Instructables184,037Views106CommentsRussellville, AR
Clinical Engineer. PhD, MBA, CET, BMET, MCSE Works with electronic, mechanical, medical, and automotive stuff. Systems Design, Repair, Modification, Repair.

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  • C4 Corvette Headlight Controller Repair

    Just take a house power cord and use one strand from it trimmed to length. Should be about right. Its a very small wire in there. I don;t think its made to be like a fuse, but is small so the relay doesnt burn up. Hope that helps. I suggest replacing the relay on the board if you feel very industrious.. I would do it with a socket so it is easier to do next time too.. Those relays are like $4 or $5.

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  • C4 Corvette Headlight Controller Repair

    Are you talking about the relay cover as in the pictures here? There are just two tabs on each side which hold it on. I would use a hook to pop them loose pressing against the circuit board. If you are talking about something beside the relay in these pictures, you might need to send me a picture to know for sure.

    It could be the relay and circuitry on the board in the control module. It could be mechanical too with the bearings in the lights heads if I am understanding your issue correctly. The circuit is based on resistance from the lights once they finish their travel as feedback to the module. I would suggest replacing the main relay and using a socket to do this as well with some bulb grease in the connectors. If the contacts of the relay have carbon'd up, you can see weird stuff happen.

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  • mrstan commented on mrstan's instructable Toothpaste Transfer Tool
    Toothpaste Transfer Tool

    As long as you have a heat source, it’s all easy good. I have used this technique with squeeze caulk as well.. it can be used for any item in squeeze tubes.. the sky is the limit...

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  • C4 Corvette Headlight Controller Repair

    I have had this car for 5 years now. It’s been a challenge and educational to be for sure...

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  • mrstan commented on b33ma247's instructable 3D Printed Rope Maker
    3D Printed Rope Maker

    Very interesting indestructible! What is your 3d printer? I do not have a 3d printer, but am looking at getting one some day as I see more and more uses for it. Good job building this instuction and the video.. seeing helps a lot I think.

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  • Fixing an Expensive Photo Lens ( Canon 85mm F1.2 L II )

    Very Good Instructable! These lenses are always very daunting in complexity. This is a very good instruction to open it up and I feel it gives confidence to others to explore these lenses too! Excellent Job!

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    • C4 Corvette Headlight Controller Repair
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    • Replacing a Garage Door Weather Seal
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  • How to Repair a Microwave Oven

    I found the part numbers that you can use.. Magnetron is WB27X10939. I see it for sale on Amazon here:https://www.amazon.com/GE-WB27X10939-Magnetron-Assembly-Microwave/dp/B004H3XQKMMain board is AP2026210. I don't see it on sale anywhere though. If it is the board, it will be the power relay on the board. Look at its part number and search for it..

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  • How to Repair a Microwave Oven

    Hey!Check this out. These guys sell parts for your microwave and this link shows the internal panels that might help you get it back in order.. Let me know if this helps you out. Buy something from these guys if it does. Its nice when these vendors have this information to help you out..https://www.appliancepartspros.com/parts-for-frigi...

    Hey there!Have you checked on the relay that drives the magnetron? Different microwaves function differently as to the drive circuit, but if the main drive relay has popped a wire in it, it simply will not heat. Look on your main circuit board for a relay (looks like a square box with lots of connectors on the bottom side of the board it is mounted to (It might have the drive line on the top too). The relay basically is the "on/off" switch for the magnetron to deliver radar EMF.when you run the microwave, you can tell it is working because you will see or hear what can be described as a "big hum" intermittently which is the magnetron cycling and shooting out the radar waves. If you don't hear this, your relay has popped. I attached a picture of a typical relay and…

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    Hey there!Have you checked on the relay that drives the magnetron? Different microwaves function differently as to the drive circuit, but if the main drive relay has popped a wire in it, it simply will not heat. Look on your main circuit board for a relay (looks like a square box with lots of connectors on the bottom side of the board it is mounted to (It might have the drive line on the top too). The relay basically is the "on/off" switch for the magnetron to deliver radar EMF.when you run the microwave, you can tell it is working because you will see or hear what can be described as a "big hum" intermittently which is the magnetron cycling and shooting out the radar waves. If you don't hear this, your relay has popped. I attached a picture of a typical relay and a schematic of what is inside of it. See if you can see some of these on your circuit board. Again, it is basicly a controlled "on/off" switch to drive the magnetron circuit. I have had to replace this relay on various microwaves which are not "cooking". I am sure you have the same situation there.

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  • How to Repair a Microwave Oven

    Interesting comment.. The University of Alabama did a test and found fire ants are attracted to the electronic hum of transformers like on power polls. Whether it is the sound of the hum, or the EMF emissions they detect, is what they are investigating.I have been watching this research because I have a power transformer box in my front yard for my neighborhood and have noticed it regularly gets invaded with fire ants in the warm months. Its funny to watch the power guys go running away after being stung a few times. LOL

    Check with mouser.com or any electronics suppliers.. fuses are everywhere.. just be sure you get the right one with the right value and properties..

    short the two pins together. I use two insulated screwdrivers touching... just dont touch the mettal parts.

    check the big capacitor.. it sounds like it is shorting out or is drying up inside.. This will make the short to ground internally and pop the fuse. See if that helps.

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  • It depends on how many of the SMD chips are in series in your situation... These are lined up in series (end to end) in strands on the bulbs. The more there are, the smaller the effect of one missing becomes. I would say that taking one out and jumping the gap should not cause much of an issue if there are like 8 or so in the line. If there are three though, it might over-drive the remaining two. When you take one out of the circuit, the remaining LEDs have to absorb the voltage drop incurred by the missing one. I hope that makes sense... The bulb I did in the instruction had 8 or 9 in each strand, so the load applied to each of the remaining LEDs was spread out. Do you know what kind of lamp you are looking at? Need to know how many LEDs are in each strand in other words...I boug…

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    It depends on how many of the SMD chips are in series in your situation... These are lined up in series (end to end) in strands on the bulbs. The more there are, the smaller the effect of one missing becomes. I would say that taking one out and jumping the gap should not cause much of an issue if there are like 8 or so in the line. If there are three though, it might over-drive the remaining two. When you take one out of the circuit, the remaining LEDs have to absorb the voltage drop incurred by the missing one. I hope that makes sense... The bulb I did in the instruction had 8 or 9 in each strand, so the load applied to each of the remaining LEDs was spread out. Do you know what kind of lamp you are looking at? Need to know how many LEDs are in each strand in other words...I bought the SMD LED chips on ebay for something like $8 for 150 chips as an example... I also noticed that when I replaced the original LEDs with the ones from ebay, they stopped "popping". This makes me think the quality of production on the chinese bulbs was not very good...

    I am looking at your board picture.. I am curious if you can post the other side of the board to see what is populated on that side. This chip looks to me like an LED driver chip instead of a rectifier.. I think the rectifier might be on the other side. The actual rectifier is quite generic and does not really need any specific value. I found several on ebay which would fit into my bulb base.. They must be able to handle 120VAC here, and I think it said 3 or 4 Amps. If you are in another country the voltage and current might be different.. Let me know and I will try to find some kind of part number for you..

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  • you can buy replacement smd leds off eBay in rolls of 100 or even 1000. Need to pay attention to the color though, or you will end up with some yellow and some white leds... I see ones in colors now too.. the physical size of the rectangles and color seem to be the biggest factors.

    I am not very familiar with the configuration of these lights, but I expect since they are 12v already like in a car application, there might be a set of three or four in series to drop the 3 or 4 volts which is typical in most string light configuration. Note the in most strings, you can snip them to length as long as you include the set of three smd leds. As to actual real cob lamps, I honestly can not speculate... I would surmise it would somehow need to follow the smd rationale though.. do you have any stats or data on those strips to review?

    good call.. leds are sensitive to heat as it alters the breakdown voltage on them...

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  • I think the link I attached is a color LED controller in stead of an LED driver.. Do a search for "LED driver" and I think you will find it. I had some bulbs which had these drivers for the LEDs to save physical space in the bulb. Digikey has a few here:https://www.digikey.com/products/en/integrated-cir...here is another place that I have not heard of before.. must be a chinese place:https://www.adafruit.com/product/1378Those are what your are looking for though..

    hi there,I do not think that chip is a rectifier. I think it is an actual LED driver chip.I see one on ebay that might be this one.. Look here on ebay and see if this one lines up with how yours is wired on your board...http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-1000pcs-WS2811-IC-led-Ch...I am not sure if you are where the AC is 120 or 220 either. The driver chips are a bunch of filters and waveform shapers to help the LEDs live longer and operate better with less distorted power going to them.. That ebay item has a pretty good diagram of the pins and circuit setup to look over too.Hope this helps a little..

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  • Just run the strips in parallel. The same 12 V will go through each pair a little strip as easily as if you tried to put them all in series. Multiple paths will allow you to drive each path individually.

    I did this nearly exactly the same running LED strips under my cabinets in my kitchen. The strips hide where you can't see them, yet provide excellent lighting for the countertops. Very good presentation here for your garage. The light should be excellent since so many sources should give you not much shadow either. Very good instructor bull and very good job.

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  • mrstan commented on mrstan's instructable Toothpaste Transfer Tool

    absolutely! And you can put your expensive toothpaste in that does not come in the tiny travel tubes too... That was the genesis of this project actually.

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  • That's completely awesome! I think it's interesting that we can fix a lightbulb now.

    That's awesome! It's also very innovative too. It's good that we can overcome problems that we encounter this way, and that just shows how someone can find a solution to any problem. Good work my friend!

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  • When I look at your pictures, I think I see a rectifier in the power supply there.. Test it with the diode checker as this is basically four diodes all pointing in one direction. Each diode should read like .590 in one direction and open in the other. You should not be seeing any AC on the LED side.. What you are saying seems to indicate your recfifier has failed and AC is getting into the DC side of the bulb. Check that out...

    you might try using the ohm meter to see if the top right and left are connected togehter and same for bottom two as well.. Maybe there are only two contacts, but for some reason they used two blobs on the pads. I noticed there are little black dots on all your LEDs. Mine all have a blackdot if they are bad.. Are yours working you say? I can not see very clearly on the picture when I zoom into it. Might take a picture of the top angle or bottom angle to see the pair of connectors on each end of the chips...

    LEDS do not light up if you put the diode checker on each of them? Do you get DC out of the power supply? Your power supply looks easy to hookup and measure with a meter...

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  • Really great job! Is the welder a Harbor Freight one? I looked at that one online yesterday and looks like it anyway.. Good instructions! I made one for fixing a gas tank with a heat gun that is similar

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  • that is what I thought too when first heard that term.. LOL

    yes, absolutely! You and JerryE4 both made this point, and it is so true. We all need to be cautious with anything electrical for safety for us and our item too.

    That is true about muddying up the COB acronym as well as others too I am sure. I found lots of reference to COB bulbs with different acronyms too. Not judging, but I know and ordered SMD chips to do this repair which were what was replaced. They call them COBs... OK.

    LOL.. it is understood...

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  • I am notsure if I understood your inquiry.. Are you wanting the source for the LED chips? The last place I bought the LED chips was here on eBay item #291791093809.. Check it out: http://www.ebay.com/itm/291791093809?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

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  • Yes, this is mostly about the Chinese EB bulbs that have the COB technology. This Bob's power supply has the discrete components as well. Some of the lightbulbs from namebrand companies have a lot of surface mount components in their power supply. These lightbulbs are very very simple. That's why they're very easy to work on.

    I was actually working on about five lightbulbs at the time I made this tutorial. I had a group of about 10 dead lightbulbs that I fixed in the process of making this tutorial.

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  • I see this message.. I am not understanding what you are saying though.. you mailed me something?

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  • I did not really get into the electronics talk in this project.. I did not feel it was really needed, but if you have questions, ask me and I can explain as well as maybe others might be wondering the same thing you are wondering as well... be good!

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  • That would probably work good.. interesting..

    How or what you use to hold the patch with is not very important, and I could have used an array of items actually.. the needle nose pliars was there at that time though. Also, the patch was a little hotter than the tank corner, with the intent on keeping the rigidity of the corner intact so the patch was more mailable than the base material.. that might be something useful to know...

    I used a pair of needle noses pliars pointing down dangling the patch piece with the tank in its back so the hole was pointing up and at an angle so the corner broken was up. This allowed me to "drop" the patch shaped like the corner in place. Since the corner was pointing up, the patch simply dropped vertically into place so all I had to do was smooth it and massage it so the two plastics would melt into one. Gotta be careful not to "melt" them fully though or get too hot or plastic will thin out.

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  • might hold it with some pliars or something while it is heating up. You just need to be able to "drop" it on the spot where you want it to be permanently. You can use anything you think feasible to your task to hold the patch while it is heating up. I apologize.. I left out that point because I thought it would be self-evident. I probably should have said something to that point though. I do not wear gloves because I like to have more control and can "feel" where I am dropping the patch.. You can wear gloves if you wish though. I think someone else brought up that point as well. It would be a good idea for safety sake though in my opinion.

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  • mrstan commented on mrstan's instructable Toothpaste Transfer Tool

    I used the same procedure to do a couple of squeeze caulk tubes together. I did some caulking in my home to paint the trim and use caulk to fill in cracks between the baseboards and trimwork and my walls. I ended up with several squeeze calk tubes that had a little bit left in each tube, so I put two tips together and squeezed all the surplus calk into one tube and ended up with an extra tube of caulk from "nothing".. LOL This is not limited to toothpaste bottles is the point here. My wife had me make one for her sunblock bottle for when we went to the beach, we reclaimed a free bottle of sunscreen.. look around and you can find other things to do this with if you use things that are in squeeze bottles like that...

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  • mrstan commented on mrstan's instructable Toothpaste Transfer Tool

    Believe it or not, I hear your exact statement from nearly everyone... LOL

    I suppose you could squeeze it into a tube using this tool.. Never thought about putting my own homemade toothpaste in one.. I do not see why not though..

    That would be pretty cool I think. I do not have a 3D printer, but I would think you could really make something crazy with that though.

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  • That is what I used the first time. Vibration caused it to loose its connection though.. lawn mower is too violent of a place evidently for a chemical repair like that.

    I need to look up some on those.. I have not heard of this mgun.. I am curious now!

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  • I made a instructable just like this one. I did not see this one here! I hope I am not a copy cat.. Here are pictures of mine if you are interested... I welded my caps together using heat so they could not come apart. Sorry to copy your process.. How embarassing!! LOL

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  • This is an excellent idea to modify a CFL into an LED... I have thought about doing this, but never did it because of being lazy. LOL I love this project!

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  • mrstan followed mrstan
      • Toothpaste Transfer Tool
      • Plastic Repairs (Gas Tank Example)
    • Plastic Repairs (Gas Tank Example)
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  • LOL. That's funny. You could always pull it out and fix it though. Just a matter of initiative I suppose.

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  • I tried two different gasoline tank patch products which always fail after a short time because of vibration and the fact that they are not part of the plastic material ultimately: It is better to fix the problem correctly the first time instead of just trying to plug a hole with a foreign material that is doomed to failure (opinion injected here). I made no suggestion of using gloves: You can do that if you wish, and might be a good idea. I do not, because I do not touch hot things with my hands normally. In an OSHA world you would need to do that. I am just fixing my gasoline tank in my place though. I do not promote or detract from PPE usage, so I leave that to whoever does this kind of stuff, and leave it external to this kind of post... By the way, do you wear protective gloves…

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    I tried two different gasoline tank patch products which always fail after a short time because of vibration and the fact that they are not part of the plastic material ultimately: It is better to fix the problem correctly the first time instead of just trying to plug a hole with a foreign material that is doomed to failure (opinion injected here). I made no suggestion of using gloves: You can do that if you wish, and might be a good idea. I do not, because I do not touch hot things with my hands normally. In an OSHA world you would need to do that. I am just fixing my gasoline tank in my place though. I do not promote or detract from PPE usage, so I leave that to whoever does this kind of stuff, and leave it external to this kind of post... By the way, do you wear protective gloves when you cook on your stove at home?.. According to OSHA regulations, you are supposed to, if one wanted to really pursue this line of thought.

    patch has been there almost 4 years now with no issues. Thanks!

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  • Where did you get the LED driver board? Was it a complete board or did you have to build it from components?

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  • My toothbrush splays out if I brush my molars up and down on the outsides I found. Maybe it could do with how you move it when brushing maybe? Dunno. I did find a kind of clip that I put on my brush that clamps around the bristles and actually squeezes them back to being straight so the next night they are all in a row again. Does anyone know what I am talking about? I would love to find another one or two as it was awesome until my wife stepped on it and now it is in two parts...

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  • no problem... same thing happens to me all the time. I put this on PFF as well and have the same name on pennocks there. I drive an 88GT.When you drive a fiero, sometimes you have to do crazy stuff like this because parts simply do not exist. LOL

    I think it would.. just have to be sure the plastic materials are close to the same kind. Like some of the comments state, there are some numbers that tell the chemical properties of the plastics to guide you... I just look if they seem the same to me if I do not see these indicators.. Hence the "slimy plastic" description. LOL

    You are correct and accurate for sure. I was just trying to put a way there someone can do this at home with very minimal knowledge or equipment needs. I did not get into the kinds of plastic or anything like melting points. Its a gas tank for an old lawn mower, so I just did it to be done... nothing really professional there. I just hope it can incite someone to do something new to them.

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