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  • Recycled Floating Shelf With Glass Jar Storage & Superfood Paint

    The ILLY brand cans do has screwcaps, the they are very sturdy, well-made cans. Other brands have simple snap caps made of plastic are won't work with your shelf. People must bully their expresso-loving pals into buying ILLY caffe exclusively.

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  • Recycled Floating Shelf With Glass Jar Storage & Superfood Paint

    Nice idea and nice work, Joop. Endlessly extendable, too, and can be adpated to existing shelves. Could work very well with Illy coffee cans, which are so well made it's a crime to throw them away. As for jars, do you know whether there's a paint or stain that can be applied to glass to exclude light? That would permit use of the jars to store spices.

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  • Big Cheap Glass Greenhouse Made From Old Windows

    Brilliant work, OrgMech! And it's terrific-looking as well.

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  • Shelving With Concealed Toe-Kick Compartment

    This is excellent, Bales. And it's about bloody time! I've been arguing for this for years, including the time I was an editor at This Old House Magazine. NO ONE would listen when I said we should reclaim this vast amount of wasted space under kitchen (esp) and bathroom cabinets.With such a drawer you suddenly develop space for all those cumbersome over-sized serving platters, pizza platters and baking stones and other stuff that is used onlyoccasionally but is absolutely necessary when you need it. Unfortunately, design in this area is hidebound to the point of being backward. By the way, an alternative to buildig your own drawers is to grab drawers from furniture being put out on the street.

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  • Homemade Orange Cleaner

    Excellent work! Would it work with any cirtus? I'm about to come into a surfeit of limes . . .

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  • How to Make a Sanding Bow

    This is an excellent DOUBLE instructable. Double because first you can make a sanding bow for peanuts rather than pay $20 to Rockler or $22 to Lee Valley Tools. Second, you now learn if you don't already know that Amazon is not necessarily your first choice?best price option. The $20 bow direct from Rockler is $30 from Azon. Same thing w/eBay, by the way. Kudos to Kinderhook.

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  • obillo commented on tinymaker's instructable Kidwash Slip N' Slide
    Kidwash Slip N' Slide

    Truly a work of diy genius, tinymaker. you could go into business with this.The slide is great and so is trhe instructable.

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  • How to Efficiently Disassemble a Pallet in Three Easy Steps

    True, but recip saw lets you work standing up, is way less noisy, and it's easier to see what you're doing and where the saw's going. But if budget is paramount, I'd take the circ. But I still say a prybar is a worthy investment. In fact, since Home Depot has 'em starting at $3.26, it's hardly an investment, and it'll last forever.

    This is pretty good, but too long, as so many steps are unnecessarily repeated. Those who wish to try this may want to note the following: 1,a jigsaw or sawzall (recip saw) is much more efficient and easier to use than a circular saw--use either if you have or can borrow one. 2, it'll be easiest if you have 2 hammers--a rip-claw >for pulling the boards off and a curved claw for extracting nails.As you can see in the video, the rip-claw doesn't give sufficient leverage in the extraction phase (shoving a small block under the rip-claw will suffice, but will be only a minor convenience. Keep in mind, the avg 16-slat pallet has 96 nails. A "spring bar" aka "wonder bar" would be your boon companion here; so would a small crowbar. After all, you're not going to stop at ju…

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    This is pretty good, but too long, as so many steps are unnecessarily repeated. Those who wish to try this may want to note the following: 1,a jigsaw or sawzall (recip saw) is much more efficient and easier to use than a circular saw--use either if you have or can borrow one. 2, it'll be easiest if you have 2 hammers--a rip-claw >for pulling the boards off and a curved claw for extracting nails.As you can see in the video, the rip-claw doesn't give sufficient leverage in the extraction phase (shoving a small block under the rip-claw will suffice, but will be only a minor convenience. Keep in mind, the avg 16-slat pallet has 96 nails. A "spring bar" aka "wonder bar" would be your boon companion here; so would a small crowbar. After all, you're not going to stop at just one pallet, are you?

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  • obillo commented on xLisax's instructable Simple Sleek Tofu Press
    Simple Sleek Tofu Press

    This seems like an enormous investment in investment in time, money, equipment and materials to solve a non-problem. I press my tofu by setting 4 squares (about 1 lb) in my sink (I always keep a clean sink--it's the extra pot that never has to be put away), cover with waxed paper, and set a stockpot full of water on top. (If you're dubious about the cleanliness of your sink, put waxed paper under the tofu as well.) Either way, the tofu is self-draining. For those who do want to make this, I'd suggest slightly countersinking the drain holes and fastening the legs from the top side with screws (for holding power) as well as glue (for sealing). In my experience, gluing end-grain wood too often leads to failure.

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  • Home Oven Steel Tempering/Coloring

    Kudos to you, CC. I hadn't thought it would be so simple, and am now inspired to try it myself.

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  • Succulent Planter From Pallet

    Nice work, ChemNerd. You could be selling these on Etsy.

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  • Anyone Can Make an Authentic Pizza

    Instructable pizza 5 21 20Nice work, my friend. Everybody should take a shot athome-made pizza. Help put an end to soggy delivery pies. My experiences andprejudices, from over a couple of decades of purely amateur experience, are asfollows:I’ve used only gas or electric ovens. Most will hit 550°F,and that will do a tin-crust pie (the ONLY worthy kind) is just a few miutes. Ihave used stones w/some success but prefer my red brick “pavers,” which measureca. 7-3/4 x 3-3/4 x 3/8. I pre-heat for 30min to 1 hr. Been using the samewooden peel for 35 years, but all Italian pizzaioli I’ve seen (and I go toItaly often and relentlessly investigate local pizza) use aluminum. None uses ascreen; I never have and never will (same for a pan). They’re totallyunnecessary. The key is sliding your pie off th…

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    Instructable pizza 5 21 20Nice work, my friend. Everybody should take a shot athome-made pizza. Help put an end to soggy delivery pies. My experiences andprejudices, from over a couple of decades of purely amateur experience, are asfollows:I’ve used only gas or electric ovens. Most will hit 550°F,and that will do a tin-crust pie (the ONLY worthy kind) is just a few miutes. Ihave used stones w/some success but prefer my red brick “pavers,” which measureca. 7-3/4 x 3-3/4 x 3/8. I pre-heat for 30min to 1 hr. Been using the samewooden peel for 35 years, but all Italian pizzaioli I’ve seen (and I go toItaly often and relentlessly investigate local pizza) use aluminum. None uses ascreen; I never have and never will (same for a pan). They’re totallyunnecessary. The key is sliding your pie off the peel and onto the bricks withease. If you can do that, no screen needed. Smoke from burnt crust and topping?I’ve had my share of spills but never tripped the smoke alarm. To make sure mypies slide easily I flour the peel, rap it on the counter to spill the excess,and shake itwhile assembling the pie: sauce, shake; topping, shake; olive oil,shake. (This eliminates the inauthentic and messy corn meal). You’re rightabout moving the pie around in the stove: the half of the pie facing the rearwill cook faster and char more than the front half—sometimes MUCH more. Piesshould be rotated 180 degrees for even cooking. Lazy or hard-pressed pizzaiolitend to skip this step, and if I get a half-cooked pie at a restaurant I justsend it back. But I find it much less important in home cooking IF you’requick. I’ve over the years developed a fairly rapid move: open, slide, slam, sothere’s little difference in heat from back to front of the over. I’m usuallystill shaking the peel as I approach the oven, because a fast slide onto thebricks is really important to even cooking. I don’t say I’m balletic, justpretty quick.I’ve auditioned cutters by the long ton. Most are lousy:they have handles that push the pie away as you push down, and often have small,inefficient wheels. My favorite is theZyliss (from Amazon), which has a 4” wheel housed in a clamshell casing, so youpush down and roll forward, and Bob’s your uncle. There are other copycats,also at Amazon, from $9 up. I’ve never tried the long knife/mezzaluna models.For the dough, I like a long slow rise, first at room temp,then overnight in the icebox. I use only 7gm of yeast (1/3 packet), ascounseled by a pizza chef I met in Milan. I think it makes for better tastethan a fast rise. In a pinch I’ve used store-bought dough (Trader Joe’s ispretty good). I never use bottled sauce: it has someone else’s choice ofspices, plus preservatives, and costs way more than canned tomatoes, which comewhole, chopped, crushed or puréed for much less. I add finely diced onions, salt,pepper, fresh garlic, smarino, basil & oregano + a little sugar. And redwine—I just can’t help myself. I start by browning the onions in oil, then the garlic,then add tomato liquid, then the solids. I try not to cook it too long—so it’sjust still liquid & pourable.My bête noire is shaping the dough. I get a pretty good disknow and then but too many are shaped like Australia. You’re dead right aboutkneading at room temp. Only masochists knead cold dough.I prefer the classic Margherita but my wife wants a piepaved with pepperoni. I get that at my Italian butcher’s, Esposito’s, 9th Ave. NYC.Supermarket stuff is overpriced and under-spiced, and even at Esposito’s I pickthe lumpiest ones on the rack—they’re drier, cured longer. Smooth pepperonilooks like a hot dog and often taste like one. I use Esposito’s whole-milkmozzarella. Supermarket stuff is always bland and sometime tasteless (Polly-O’sis the least bad; do you have a recommendation?). Skim milk mozzarella isawful. Pencil erasers taste better. To the kitchen, everybody!

    I see people asking about 00 flour.In Naples they blended 00 with hard winter wheat flour, called by them Manitoba because postwar so much imported flour came from there and that name was stamped on the sacks. 00 is available at many Italian specialty stores but you can also try substituting American CAKE flour. This is much finer than bread flour; it's sold in boxes, like cake mix, not paper sacks. Like 00, it shopuld be sifted for measuring, because it does tend to pack or cake. Swans Down is a brand I used before I began smuggling 00 back from Italy in my luggage. Now I get 00 at Buon'Italia in NYC's Chelsea Market.

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  • obillo commented on 38ren's instructable Citrus Cleaner
    Citrus Cleaner

    Kudoes to you, 38Ren! Simple, ludicrously cheap compared to commercial version, highly effective. I'd recommed light chopping the peels to get more into the jar. For spray bottles, take a furtive look into your local recycling bin and the result will be somewhere between 'spoiled for choice' and'embarrassment of riches.' Now then--can you come up with something to make from Christman tree needles>

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  • How to Restore an Old Junkyard Motorcycle

    Truly fine ible--you've got me dreaming again. I'll be looking for something older, say a British 2-cyl, sit-up-straight model or an old BMW of mid-60s vintage. Modern bikes haven't appealed to me esthetically for decades.

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  • Kveik - Brewers Yeast Ring

    Wow and thanks. I love any example of old-time ingenuity.

    Terrifi ile--but how is this supposed to preserve yeast?

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  • obillo commented on ExplodedView's instructable Clippy 3D Modelling
    Clippy 3D Modelling

    Scary! This looks way too much like Bob or was it Clippy?--- the roundly hated irritating character Microsoft in the 1990s. Named to Time magazine's '50 Worst Inventions," he--or It--was axed in about one year.

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  • Pallet Wood Butcherblock Countertop That Pivots! (bar Top ➔ Dining Table)

    Living here in Manhattan (not the one in Kansas) it breaks my heart that I don't have a shop: there are pallets and other shipping platforms all over the place, begging to be taken.The good news for those who do have shops is that industry seems to have given up completely on the idea of re-using them, and so all of the pallets I've seen on the streets for the past year or so appear top be untreated--i.e., not soaked to dangerous preservatives. This opens the way for may more uses of pallet wood.

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  • Lazy Man Bread | 4 Ingredients Bread Recipe | No Knead | No Machine

    How about first stirring in the yeast, then when thoroughly combine, stirring in the yeast?

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  • DIY Hand Wiped Tinning of Old Copper Pots/Pans - Step by Step Instructions

    Thisis a great post but I disagree that thickness necessarily equals quality. Ofthe pots displayed at the top of this post I'll wager none is 3mm or even 2mmthick. Such pots were always made by individual artisans working with thinsheet copper and simple hand tools. They typically used a piece for the bottom,a piece for the sides and a piece for the handle--plus rivets. Then brass wasused to braze the bits together. (Aside: that’s what you have, KelvinT, notsolder.) I have 2 such jewels, said to be Russian-Jewish 18th Cy. Neither isthicker than a penny. Don't know what they'd fetch now but I probably would geta nice return on the $15 each I paid in 1965. Both are saucepans; they cookjust fine. The super-thickpots that the French fetishize (along w/amateur pot fanatics or potheads) areindu…

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    Thisis a great post but I disagree that thickness necessarily equals quality. Ofthe pots displayed at the top of this post I'll wager none is 3mm or even 2mmthick. Such pots were always made by individual artisans working with thinsheet copper and simple hand tools. They typically used a piece for the bottom,a piece for the sides and a piece for the handle--plus rivets. Then brass wasused to braze the bits together. (Aside: that’s what you have, KelvinT, notsolder.) I have 2 such jewels, said to be Russian-Jewish 18th Cy. Neither isthicker than a penny. Don't know what they'd fetch now but I probably would geta nice return on the $15 each I paid in 1965. Both are saucepans; they cookjust fine. The super-thickpots that the French fetishize (along w/amateur pot fanatics or potheads) areindustrial products for the most part (and today, probably entirely). They areheavy, sturdy and expensive as hell. Maybe they once had to be made that way tostand up to the abuse handed out by the overworked, underpaid slaveys of hotelkitchens in Parist (see Orwell's "Down and Out in Paris . . . "). In fact, the thinner the metal the more you take advantageof copper's superb conductivity (although you have to pay more attention incooking to avoid burning. I have several restaurant rescues (age unknown), allsauté pans, all thin. In sum, I hold that 1) thickness is way less importantthat popularly imagined and 2) copper is unnecessary most of the time. You needit only for high-heat fast cooking--i.e.. sautéeing. A copper stock pot? Stewpot? Ridiculous. You use them for briefly browning and then slow cook for manyhours on low heat. So why copper for so many pots? Because there were noalternatives. Copper is easy to work, wasn't unduly expensive, was more durablethan ceramics and not unduly hard to mine and refine. It was THE material ofchoice because there was no choice. Clay was fragile. Cast iron was decadesaway and aluminum even farther off. Nevertheless Ihave way too much of the stuff because it is simply beautiful despite its highmaintenance, which I deal with as follows: 1) always heat copper slowly--itseems to prevent those bluish blooms at the bottom. 2) always clean immediatelyor at least soak 'em so your don't need to scrub dried-on bits of food. My preferred method is to wash w/detergentfirst, then while still warm slosh ketchup all over (I assume that the cheaphouse brands are more acidic, which is desirable) and rinse w/hot water. 3)Towel dry IMMEDIATELY. Water droplets left to evaporate in air or in thedishwasher (which I never use) often create water spots that seem impossible toremove. Result will be a Restaurant Shine. The labor- intensive Martha StewartShine I leave to Martha Stewart.A vinegar-salt mixalso works. I used it until I discovered ketchup. Hard on the skin.Tried immersing in boiling vinegar but only once, Workled find but tarnish returnedtoo quickly, house smelled like a picklery, wife enraged. Nuff said.FYI I clean theinteriors for sanitary purposes, but polish them? I'd no more polish tin thatpeel a potato. ALL polishing is abrasive and all tin is soft; not a good mix. Ifyou want to display your shiny tin, have at it but I hang my pots (on paddedhooks) so only their beautiful bottoms are displayed. Also, the insides don'tcollect dust that way.Every once in agreat while I have to attack w/something stronger: Noxon (viciously abrasive),Brasso (quick to tarnish), Goddards, and the like. My latest find is NorwegianRed Bear, a powder that is red in color and a bear for cleaning. Works almostinstantly because it's loaded w/oxalic acid. That requires eye protection and amask over your nose. Very expensive--$12 to $16 for 3oz all over the net, eBayincluded. But if you live near a Jack's 99cent store you may be in luck. Jack'shas it at 2.99. Hurry!When buying copperalways inspect the lip of the pot to see how thick the copper is. If the lipshows only tin, it's likely your pot was tinned by a master. Otherwise lookclosely. Often you'll see that what you're looking at is merely an aluminum orsteel pot with an exterior of copper so thin it might have been applied with apaintbrush. At least one famous name has stooped to this. At one of the foodieonline forums the potheads are over the moon about the French co. Mauviel--soexpensive I'd never even seen its products. Then last Dec I was in a high-end NYC dept store and decided to visit thekitchen dept. Place was wall-to-wall Mauviel. I picked up a saucepan andthe thing practically flew out of my hands toward the ceiling. Almostweightless. Close inspection revealed lots of aluminum and merely decorativecoating of copper. Also beware of the "rolled lip." You find it wherea steel pot's lip has been rolled outward to cover (again) a tiny coating ofcopper. It's impossible toemphasize enough the safety regs posited above. esp. water "always pourthe acid into the water" rule. Pouring water into acid can result is avirtual volcanic eruption, with widespread high-speed spattering of corrosiveacid all over the place. Yes, eye protection! Yes, skin protection! Yes,ventilation!I'll close bysaying it's OK to cook with bare spots if you avoid acidic foods (so forget tomatosauce, for example) and don't leave the food in the pot. For spot repairscontact the nice lady known to me as the Angel of New Jersey, aka Tin Lizzie,who sells a 9x9 sheet of pure tin and a bottle of acid flux by mail for (Iforget) maybe $20): Au Cuisines Inc, 43 Saddle Ranch Lane, Hillsdale NJ07642.

    Yes. For spot repairscontact the nice lady known to me as the Angel of New Jersey, aka Tin Lizzie,who sells a 9x9 sheet of pure tin and a bottle of acid flux by mail for (Iforget) maybe $20): Au Cuisines Inc, 43 Saddle Ranch Lane, Hillsdale NJ07642.

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  • Reusable Oil Burning Wicks!

    "Most people have polarized sunglasses . . ." Don't rely on this! Check by holding sunglasses a foot from face and facing a reflective surface. Then slowly rotate them to see whether the any of the reflections diminish. If so, you've got polarization.If not, NOT. I say this because with the rise of cellphones & other electronic devices, many sunglass mfrs have stopped polarizing because it makes screens hard to read. So unless your sunglasses are marked 'polarized' check!Now to questions . . 1. OK to use other oils, such as canola?2. What about melted parafin?

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  • Air Fryer French Fries

    Nice going, Matt. FYI, there are at least two varieties of Russet potatoes--Burbank and the other one. The Burbank is best by test, though sometimes scorned by the uninformed for tending to irregularity in size and shape.

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  • Classic Restaurant Style Belgian Waffles

    Excellent example of what an instructable should be: brief and to the point. Am I alone in having noticed that lately some have become long-winded and loaded with too many photos? As an editor I'm sensitive to excesses.

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  • How to Make Nashville Hot Chicken

    Recipe looks pretty good but the Instructible overall would be more effective if recast in standard recipe style, with clear, staked lists =of ingredients and instructions. And probably fewer pix.As for wooden cutting boards: Chefspenser is incorrect. A wave of anti-wood hysteria was unleashed a couple of decades by a 'study' that was soon proven to be inadequate and inaccurate; furthermore, plastic boards (which are hard on knives) proved to be better incubators of germs than wood. The great value of plastic is that it stands up well to hot water and harsh cleansers, so is dishwasher-safe. I've used wooden boards almost exclusively for more than 30 years with no hospital visits required for me, family or guests. Just clean them promptly, wiping down thoroughly with alcohol or hydrogen pe…

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    Recipe looks pretty good but the Instructible overall would be more effective if recast in standard recipe style, with clear, staked lists =of ingredients and instructions. And probably fewer pix.As for wooden cutting boards: Chefspenser is incorrect. A wave of anti-wood hysteria was unleashed a couple of decades by a 'study' that was soon proven to be inadequate and inaccurate; furthermore, plastic boards (which are hard on knives) proved to be better incubators of germs than wood. The great value of plastic is that it stands up well to hot water and harsh cleansers, so is dishwasher-safe. I've used wooden boards almost exclusively for more than 30 years with no hospital visits required for me, family or guests. Just clean them promptly, wiping down thoroughly with alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. With any board avoiding cross-contamination is a must. After cutting meat on the board, clean it before putting other stuff on it.

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  • obillo commented on rabbitcreek's instructable Alaska Bear Troller
    Alaska Bear Troller

    Perhaps the above is yopur reply to some post other than mine?

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  • obillo commented on rabbitcreek's instructable Alaska Bear Troller
    Alaska Bear Troller

    This is really nice, Rabbitcreek, but I'm confused as to its purpose. I'd been taught that the bell was a great idea because it let the bear know of one's approach, the idea being that bears react badly to surprises. The breaking twig, FYI, was an extremely popular plot device in the early 19th Cy "Leatherstocking Tales" of James Fenimore Cooper, but in your device it seems like a warning that would arouse bear to a state of defensiveness, a kind of ursine DefCon 5 that might lead to a pre-emptive strike. Like George57 below I'm doubtful. As to Tom Smith's experiment with bels, in which the bears didn't react: maybe their lack of reaction meant the heard the noise and decided to ignore it as representing nothing important and certainly not a threat. You know, 'move along--nothin…

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    This is really nice, Rabbitcreek, but I'm confused as to its purpose. I'd been taught that the bell was a great idea because it let the bear know of one's approach, the idea being that bears react badly to surprises. The breaking twig, FYI, was an extremely popular plot device in the early 19th Cy "Leatherstocking Tales" of James Fenimore Cooper, but in your device it seems like a warning that would arouse bear to a state of defensiveness, a kind of ursine DefCon 5 that might lead to a pre-emptive strike. Like George57 below I'm doubtful. As to Tom Smith's experiment with bels, in which the bears didn't react: maybe their lack of reaction meant the heard the noise and decided to ignore it as representing nothing important and certainly not a threat. You know, 'move along--nothing to see here'?

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  • Vermiculite, Gym Ball Dome, Wood Fired Pizza Oven

    This is so good, phammy57, that I elevate you to the position of Honorary Italian, and therefore render your name in Roman numerals: phammyLVII. You are dead right about the need for FLAME. I'm picky about pizza and every timer I go to Italy, which is pretty often, I consult with local experts about best pizzerias, then visit them and, between bites, seek wisdom. So far, all agree on flames. Inm fact from personal observation I'll say that the flames must not only dance, they must WALTZ. Slowly. Also, the inner walls of the over should be coated in white ash. Again, congratulations.

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  • Grilled Butter Onions

    Count me in on adding bacon. Buy more important to me is this: is the foil really necessary if the onions are cooked in a skillet or oven?

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  • Nah, CQ: I WILL take your word for it. Thanks.

    Excellent! What about microwaving? M'waves cook from inside out and should work the same way as your method.

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  • I have lots of old silver US coins that are so worn and battered as to have zero collecting value. What about filing them down and using the filins as silver solder?

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  • obillo commented on Kuzmanic's instructable Charcoal Retort

    Pretty impressive, but I'm sorry you had to buy the box section. Don't know where you live but here in NYC and I presume other dense urban areas one of the commonest--and most ignored--street-find materials is the mattress frame. They're made of steel angle iron and run 6 ft long and more. Should be easily welded into box sections.Think it would work?

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  • You're always safe with buckets from restaurants, luncheonettes and cafeterias: food has to be put into food-grade plastic. If the bucket smells, scrub out w/hot water and baking soda. FYI Screamingeagle's suggestioin anticipated mine re supporting bucket on blocks. Also I'd like to get away with a smaller hole. Think 1" will do if you're careful. Adding another plant to the topside is a good idea.

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  • obillo commented on carl5blum's instructable Table Top Saber Saw

    Yes, Carl, you're dead right about that. A larger table will be needed too--and a VERY stable one. Cheers!

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  • obillo commented on carl5blum's instructable Table Top Saber Saw

    Nice job! Should be able to do the same with a circular saw, no?

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  • obillo commented on aaahotdog's instructable Shortening a Mouse's Tail

    Kudos to you! So much stuff comes with excessively long cords The one on my mouse is about 3 feet long. I'm a bit of a klutz but I think I'll try this, practicing on a spare first. FYI, re wireless vs. wired: EVERY tech uy I've talked to says that battery worries aside, wired is flat-out more reliable.

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  • This is a nice piece of work. As almost all drawers do have recessed bottoms--which become the backs of these units, the french cleat is the way to go--it simplifies installation, letting you level the cleat on the wall instead of the whole unit. You can then, if you wish, screw the unit to the cleat. At the bottom, add another piece of same-dimension lumber (furring strips are ideal for light units) at the bottom--fastened first to the drawer unit itself, then, if desired, to the wall. This piece is not cleat-cut--it's just a piece of furring strip.

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  • obillo commented on FOOD by Lyds's instructable Indian Garlic Naan

    What would you say to baking these in an oven on quarry tiles or firebricks?

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  • I'm with happydupa--please help re processing buckeyes. And thank for the good instructions re acorns Free food--who can beat that?

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  • Thanks. Motors shd be readily available in large urban areas where many computers are simply tossed into the trash or left the the cub for sanitation dept pick up. Some cities have recycling centers. I'm sure that w/a little persuasion motor-seekers would be allowed to extract some parts--after all that IS what recycling is all about, no?

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  • Looks terrific. Pardon my ignorancve but 1] what is ESC and 2] how to distinguish between inrunner and outrunner motors?

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  • You are dead right in saying that many expensive commercial products are just dressed-up versions of ordinary stuff. I recall seeing a bottle of fancy stuff for getting winter road salt off boots and shoes priced at $6 for 8 oz.. It was just vinegar and water.

    Manty thatks, KC. In this wise we keep knowledge alive! Bil

    What about linseed oil and petroleum products--paraffi and the like? I've used--with success--Vaseline to preserve wooden knife handles.

    Thanks, KC. I've used mineral oil a lot on cutting boards as well as knife handles--always warning it first, possibly out of groundless/irrational superstition. Particularly good on cutting boards because it doesn't stink or turn rancid and it edible. You've booted me back into experimental mode, so where do you get rottenstone, diatomaceous earth, etc.? Possibly a professional painters' supply (as distinct from the local ACE Hardware)? I will try to find Bon Ami, though my mother always preferred Old Dutch Cleanser. Used to use toothpaste to polish my pipe stems, but now the whole industry seems to have gone over to gels, which don't work well.Maybe if I mixed them with some baking powder or or starch. I love this kind of make-do craft craftiness. Couple of centuries ago I refinished a w…

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    Thanks, KC. I've used mineral oil a lot on cutting boards as well as knife handles--always warning it first, possibly out of groundless/irrational superstition. Particularly good on cutting boards because it doesn't stink or turn rancid and it edible. You've booted me back into experimental mode, so where do you get rottenstone, diatomaceous earth, etc.? Possibly a professional painters' supply (as distinct from the local ACE Hardware)? I will try to find Bon Ami, though my mother always preferred Old Dutch Cleanser. Used to use toothpaste to polish my pipe stems, but now the whole industry seems to have gone over to gels, which don't work well.Maybe if I mixed them with some baking powder or or starch. I love this kind of make-do craft craftiness. Couple of centuries ago I refinished a walnut rifle stock with a stainmy by soaking chewing tobacco in denatured alcohol, then rubbing it endlessly with linseed . . .

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  • obillo commented on DanielJR97's instructable How to Drive a Manuel

    Everybody should learn manual or stick shift. But please note: note all gearboxes use the same shift pattern.

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  • TerryN4 and macgyver have supplied good tips to this nifty ible. Id like to add that any piece of broken bottle glass will sub nicely for a cabinet scraper. And that for a 'golf club' shine on portions of the hammer it's worth trying several grades of crocus cloth.

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  • obillo commented on jprussack's instructable How to Make Bread Pudding

    I don't understand this:Preheat to 350F (175C) - allow 40min for bread to soak in the mixtureDrop to 300F (150C) - when the pan goes in the ovenIf the pan goes in at 300, why heat to 350? Shouldn't it be "soak brad 40 min and put in pre-heated 300 oven"? Or am I missing a step?

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  • This is such a fine, straightforward and helpful Instructable that';s it may be churlish of me to pretest against the use of 'wanna' for 'want to,' but there it is. In any event, readers should pay close attention. In step 3, note that JulioC150 uses TWO wrenches to tighten. Using only one often results in out-of-round thin-wall tubing. Aggressive tightening of pipe cutters probably ruins more copper tube than anything else, although the warning re overheating and not wiping excess flux are important. Another point against Drano is its high cost. Mixing vinegar and baking soda will produce chlorine gas, but hardly enough to be dangerous. Still, if you're worried--Open a Window! Or mix some ordinary flour with dish-washing liquid--cheapest kind--to make a thin, pourable paste. That will of…

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    This is such a fine, straightforward and helpful Instructable that';s it may be churlish of me to pretest against the use of 'wanna' for 'want to,' but there it is. In any event, readers should pay close attention. In step 3, note that JulioC150 uses TWO wrenches to tighten. Using only one often results in out-of-round thin-wall tubing. Aggressive tightening of pipe cutters probably ruins more copper tube than anything else, although the warning re overheating and not wiping excess flux are important. Another point against Drano is its high cost. Mixing vinegar and baking soda will produce chlorine gas, but hardly enough to be dangerous. Still, if you're worried--Open a Window! Or mix some ordinary flour with dish-washing liquid--cheapest kind--to make a thin, pourable paste. That will often unstick hair clogs. Whatever you use, give it plenty of time to work. And heed JulioC150 re saddle valves. So simple! So ingenious! So cheap! But they WILL fail sooner or later and, since they're usually hidden behind drywall--that mess will be beyond horrible.

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  • Most baking experts agree that a slow overnight rise in the icebox results in better flavor and better-handling dough.Better than store-bought? I'll have to try and see. of the many brands avble Thomas's is the gold standard--no other comes close and most are travesties.

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  • Very nice work, MaGr. As tyo the finish, I'm contemplating using West Marine epoxy. As to the cutting, I'm going to tilt saw blade 45 degrees, which result in an almost invisible cut line. A little practice may be necessary on scrap pieces, but I've seen pros do this an produce excellent work. For example, all my baseboards were cut that way.

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  • I thik that when Matt specifies 'pure pumpkin' he means to be sure you don't use pumpkin-pie mix. The two cans are nearly identical in labeling and easy to confuse.

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  • A story stick is a must when hanging shingles on a house.

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  • Clever work! Please excuse my pedantry in noting the the proper term is plane IRON. It's hundreds of years old and worth preserving as part of the craftsmanship tradition. That said, I will now get to work on copying your jig.

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  • This is a handsome and economical solution; kudos to you for both cleverness and TASTE. Every time I go into a young parents' home I'm assaulted by the horrifying array of bulbous plastic junk in colors not found in nature. (Decades from now I'm sure we'll learn that early exposure to these horror do irreparable damage to the human soul.) Also horrible are playpens with nylon netting. I assume the Ikea cribs you used are up to current safety standards, but those looking to replicate this playpen should take care: the openings between the slats must not be greater than 2-3/8" or 6cm according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. (For this reason CPSC warns against buying used cribs, and some thrift shop refuse to take them.) Infants have been known to squeeze their bodies bet…

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    This is a handsome and economical solution; kudos to you for both cleverness and TASTE. Every time I go into a young parents' home I'm assaulted by the horrifying array of bulbous plastic junk in colors not found in nature. (Decades from now I'm sure we'll learn that early exposure to these horror do irreparable damage to the human soul.) Also horrible are playpens with nylon netting. I assume the Ikea cribs you used are up to current safety standards, but those looking to replicate this playpen should take care: the openings between the slats must not be greater than 2-3/8" or 6cm according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. (For this reason CPSC warns against buying used cribs, and some thrift shop refuse to take them.) Infants have been known to squeeze their bodies between slats, then strangle when they can't get their heads through. Some people think the min-dist thing is crazy over-protectiveness, but at crib and playpen age you can deal with a little over-protection. You can be more relaxed later

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  • Nice project, gzumwalt, but for several reasons (cost, convenience, ecology) I'll make this out of styrofoam (which is, I'm told, NOT styrofoam but expanded polystyrene). What ever it's called, comes with almost every package of store-bought meat and many store-bought vegetables. Cleans with ease, too.

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  • obillo commented on acoens's instructable Organic Backyard Lemon Curd

    Nice work, Acoens. FYI If I can't find baker's sugar I'll substitute bar sugar--it's may be the same thing but is marketed to bartenders for easy mixing in cocktails.

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  • Great work, BMB. Can ordinary calcium tablets be substituted--they might be cheaper than antacid tablets because they're not brand-name medicines If no, then I'll try store-brand antacids. Thanks again.

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  • Really nice work, MaxPower. Re airlocked or airbound tanks. If you can get a slim tube--maybe a plastic straw before they disappear from the plant--poked down into the valve you will have all the air escape you need. Also: would this work with a scrap hot-water-heater tank?

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  • In many cases (marinating, crumbs, pipinp, for example) ordinary plastic bags--those provided at produce counters and the ordinary bags with loop handles that come with every purchase are more than sufficient substitutes, cheaper, and available in many sizes. For paint brushes, in fact mere Saran Wrap suffices. For packing material, wadded newspaper works fine unless items are small enough to slip between the wads (commercial shipped use wads often). JustinC208 is right--ziplocs are too risky to use for packing. And they're (relatively) expensive, let alone being too good to waste.

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  • Terrific recipe--but I would never waste a perfectly good ziploc bag to marinate the chicken. So many plastic bags are all over the place with almost any food we buy. They're on huge rolls in the produce section; they come with loaves of bread and trays of English muffins. If you worry about the printing on some bags leaching into your food, just whip the bag inside out. To make sure there are no leaks, inflate by mouth before using.

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  • I'll try this--seems easy and quick, and I love CRUNCH. But I will absolutely NOT peel the carrots: seems to me like a waster of time and food. Anywya, there is practically no peel on a carrot. Same with potatoes today, and I don't peel them either. Is there some functional reason you recommend peeling?

    Well, I'm 77 and in what my doctor calls 'boringly good health.' I may occasionally scrub a carrot w/a scotchbrite pad, but that tales mere seconds; peeling takes a lot long and you have to clean up the peels. All in all I say, a little sarcastically, the organic stuff upsets the delicate balance of chemicals in my system. Eat organics if you want to and can afford to but I really don;'t think agribusiness has been poisoning the world.

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  • Re DOPE: would it help to make the stuff flow readily by warming the can with a heat gun?

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  • Old-time gunmakers used to stain their stocks with a stain made from chewing tobacco and denatured alcohol.--if you're up for further experimentation. I'm going to try you stain first chance I get, so plenty thabnks for this!

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  • obillo commented on jerbtown's instructable Vinegar Pie

    Re real vs imitation vanilla. Experts have told me that the imitation is actually better than the real because the real stuff loses some flavor in baking. Anyone else heard this?

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  • obillo commented on djpolymath's instructable Making Vinegar

    Nice work, dj! But surely stainless steel would be OK for a container, as it's non-reactive? I do want to try this, because at the wine tastings I often go to there are lots of leftovers that are routinely thrown down the drain. Seems a shame as they are often top-grade wines. But as most wines are 12.5-14% alcohol, it's have to be diluted. I'm planning on diluting with plain water, then dumping in a healthy dose of cider vinegar with mother, which is now readily available at Trader Joe's and other other stores. Maybe just a cupful, mother included? Also, how to keep mother alive? I'm going to Tuscany soon and I know a winemaker there who has offered me some of his family's mother, which he says is 300 years old! I'd like to bring some back . . .

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  • Terrific job, jcb! Can I use the same recipe on spare ribs? Done in oven? Can you give the amounts of maltose syrup and red fermented bean curd? Those ARE readily avble where I live. Thanks again for a great recipe!

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  • obillo commented on jprussack's instructable How to Dry a Cell Phone

    Excellent! Also: attach phone to dog's collar. Put dog in car. Open side window so dog can stick head out. Go for a long ride.Years ago a hysterical neighbor came crying to me: she'd done 2 weeks' work on her laptop without backing up even once. Then she spilled her coffee into the keyboard. All she wanted was sympathy but I had her get out the hair dryer while I yanked of the keys. Then I turned the dryer on it. After 10 min, voila! It began coming back to life--only to die aain. I kept on drying, and after another 10 min or so it came back, and this time for longer before dying again. Third time was the charm: it came back after total 30-35 min drying time and stayed alive for good. So jprussak has the right idea: don't immediately assume that water has destroyed your device. Tring to s…

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    Excellent! Also: attach phone to dog's collar. Put dog in car. Open side window so dog can stick head out. Go for a long ride.Years ago a hysterical neighbor came crying to me: she'd done 2 weeks' work on her laptop without backing up even once. Then she spilled her coffee into the keyboard. All she wanted was sympathy but I had her get out the hair dryer while I yanked of the keys. Then I turned the dryer on it. After 10 min, voila! It began coming back to life--only to die aain. I kept on drying, and after another 10 min or so it came back, and this time for longer before dying again. Third time was the charm: it came back after total 30-35 min drying time and stayed alive for good. So jprussak has the right idea: don't immediately assume that water has destroyed your device. Tring to save may fail but you've got nothing to lose.

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  • The magnetic knife rack is a good idea but please store your knives more carefully: all should go handle down/blade up, cutting edge (in your case) to the right. To remove knives, twist the handle (in your case) counter-clockwise so you don't damage the edge on the mag strip.Others wishing to adopt this excellent idea should look for a magnetic tool bar that a mag KNIFE bar. As a rule, the former are practical items with reasonable prices. The latter are gourmet items that may cost much more.

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  • obillo commented on randofo's instructable IPhone Camera Spinner

    If you can live with a smaller-diameter disc Amazon and many others will sell you one that has a shaft or stem built in, eliminating the need for the coupler.

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  • Re my comment on most cleavers being basically blunt instruments powered by muscle and weight: Most Oriental cleavers--the real one, not the Chinese ones made to Western patterns--are VEGETABLE cleavers, very light and very sharp. Absolutely not to be used as Western meat cleavers are. By the way, Alex: you might give a class on grinding. Most of us could benefit therefrom.

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  • Fine-looking tool. But why not stand the cleaver vertically in a milk carton full of vinegar? Can't say for certain that that would have removed all rust but would have made your job easier. I'm dubious about the degree of sharpness you chose. A cleaver is basically a blunt instrument, one that is 'sharp enough' but relies on brute force. Mightn't the paper-slicing edge be damaged if the cleaver meets with bones, as its maker intended? I have an antique cleaver around here somewhere and you have inspired me to look for it and clean it up. (But NOT use it. I abandoned it years ago when I discovered that, for ordinary home use, the smallest Gerber or Fiskars camp hatchet is an excellent substitute.

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  • Nice going, Belsey. But why CASTILE soap specifically? Also, others wishing to benefit from Belsey's work please note that no one who can reach into a recycling bin ever has to BUY a spray bottle. This seems almost insultingly obvious but I've seen too many people buying spray bottles that are identical to those most people simply trash.

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  • So much for the Ten Commandments then, eh?

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  • Bryan, I have no beef with quartz movement, but using them to fake pendulum clocks goes against my grain. (I've yet to see one that's convincing, besides.) But I'd be very happy to get a quartz movement that I could put my own sounds on, or that could handle ship's bells.

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  • This is an excellent piece of work, Bryan, save for one thing: faking a pendulum clock is just wrong. I may well build your box but only after scouring eBay and various clock collector websites to find a real mechanical movement. Sorry, but I'm a purist. However, your clock-activated speaker is a great idea and I urge you to do an instruct of that.

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  • "figure eight shape traced by the sun" ??? I thought it was the earth that moved. Now much confused.

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  • obillo commented on Sebastiaan Mollema's instructable Folding Ladder !

    That's a nice-looking ladder, Sebastiaan, but I am concerned that it may not be safe in long-term use. First, since you have nice, thick pieces for the top, I think you'd be better off fastening the hinges with through-bolts (carriage bolts or similar) rather than wood screws. Second, your steps seem suspect--at least, I wouldn't trust them long term. All you've got to secure them are four skinny wood screws run into end grain. My experience is that screws don't hold well in end grain. And they appear to be drywall screws, which are untrustworthy in structural uses. Since you have already installed the steps I propose that you strengthen them: screw and glue cleats underneath the ends of each step, then screw the steps to the cleats. That shouldn't take you much more than an hour. Third, …

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    That's a nice-looking ladder, Sebastiaan, but I am concerned that it may not be safe in long-term use. First, since you have nice, thick pieces for the top, I think you'd be better off fastening the hinges with through-bolts (carriage bolts or similar) rather than wood screws. Second, your steps seem suspect--at least, I wouldn't trust them long term. All you've got to secure them are four skinny wood screws run into end grain. My experience is that screws don't hold well in end grain. And they appear to be drywall screws, which are untrustworthy in structural uses. Since you have already installed the steps I propose that you strengthen them: screw and glue cleats underneath the ends of each step, then screw the steps to the cleats. That shouldn't take you much more than an hour. Third, you have steps on both sides. I suggest replacing one set of steps with X-bracing for rigidity and stability.

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  • obillo commented on Joerg Engels's instructable Cramaillotte

    Thanks, Joerg. I think I will try regular sugar and add the pectin I usually use when making jam.

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  • obillo commented on Joerg Engels's instructable Cramaillotte

    What is "gelling sugar"--a particular kind, or just ordinary sugar USED FOR gelling?

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  • Does this work with square-base keys? Actually, I just pry off the SHIFT key and toss it in the kbd drawer. On the extremely rare occasions I need all upper case, I just poke a pen into the shift receptacle.

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  • The bottle-cutting set I bought through Whole earth Catalogue back in the '60s had a long knob-ended bent wire, about as thick as chain-link fence wire, which was then slipped through the neck of the bottle. The knob end was then tapped repeatedly and gently along the score mark from the inside. "Inside" or side opposite the score is the key, Likewise with the ball end of the hardware-store tool mention above: tap from BEHIND the score. Worked every time for me.

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  • This is just the ticket for owner-built housing. In 1975. my neighbor Dave Surbeck designed a house of modular panels to be constructed on his property on Martha's Vineyard. The basic module was a 4x8 ply panel with 2x4 stringers between. The stringers were all the same, for the idea was to make the panels into giant tongue-and-groove units. So, on one long side of the panel, the first 2x4 would be nailed/glued 2" in the the edge (that is, the thickness of a 2x4). That constituted the groove. On the other side, two 2x4s were nailed/glued together and laid down with one of those 2x4s sticking out from the edge: thus we had a tongue on that side. We also laid 3 parallel 2x4s between them, packed in some insulation and spread glue by the long ton. Then the top 4x8 was laid on and nailed…

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    This is just the ticket for owner-built housing. In 1975. my neighbor Dave Surbeck designed a house of modular panels to be constructed on his property on Martha's Vineyard. The basic module was a 4x8 ply panel with 2x4 stringers between. The stringers were all the same, for the idea was to make the panels into giant tongue-and-groove units. So, on one long side of the panel, the first 2x4 would be nailed/glued 2" in the the edge (that is, the thickness of a 2x4). That constituted the groove. On the other side, two 2x4s were nailed/glued together and laid down with one of those 2x4s sticking out from the edge: thus we had a tongue on that side. We also laid 3 parallel 2x4s between them, packed in some insulation and spread glue by the long ton. Then the top 4x8 was laid on and nailed down in a frenzy of hammering. We used long cement-coated nails called 'sinkers' locally. Every night after work and before supper I'd go to Dave's and we'd bash panels together in his cellar. We got to be pretty good at it, eventually getting to three panels and hour between just the two of us (other friends gave Dave a wide berth--he always had a hammer to offer anyone who'd use it). The next summer we loaded the panels and some huge beams and columns into a rented truck and drove them to the Vineyard from eastern Pa. We had the house assembled in about three days, and after that there was just interior finish work to be done. Here's what the panels looked like in cross-section, if you're willing to think of the Xx as 2x4s: ------------------------------------XX X X X -------------------------------------I'm sorry about the disgraceful crudeness of the above. Maybe it will be clearer if imagine away the space between the tops and bottoms of the Xs.Anyway the result was a delightful summer house that still serves the Surbecks 40 years later. It cost very little and was an easy build. I tried to get Dave to publish and sell plans, but he couldn't be bothered. At any rate, all you really need to know is the 'secret' of the tongue-and-groove panels.

    Sorry--in the above I mean the stringer were NOT all the same, asone of them consisted of 2 2x4s nailed together and the other were singles.

    Me again. My rough drawing was bad enough but Ibles' word processor made it worse. Sorry, but you'll just have to work it out from my description. Or maybe some Ibler who can draw will help out.

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  • obillo commented on scoochmaroo's instructable How to Carve a Turkey

    Absolutely right on all counts, oilitright. Slice, slice, slice--don't push! And no night-before stuffing unless you're trying to kerep 911 in business.But please: 'rather THAN' not 'rather THEN.'

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  • How about putting the dough in directly--i.e., with no loaf pan? Possibly you could do it right away OR after a second rise. What do you think?

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  • obillo commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Best thing s about WD-40: the new spray cap with its wonderful flex-hose nozzle is easily removed and will fit most other much better products, such as Boeshield T-9 and Corrosion-X.

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  • This seems to be pretty much everything an instructable should be, and it has an excellent result as well. Conmgratultyions!

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  • JeffS2, check the note at the bottom left of the comment box: "We have a be nice comment policy. Please be positive and constructive." You should try it sometime. People who mentioned safety were not 'bickering,' they were making an important point--physical safety--and obviously the creators of this lovely stair were already or were made aware of it, because they added the rail proposed by several here, myself included, rather than try to bribe the inspector, as you seem to suggest. Another problem for me is what appear to be extra-thick treads, which can be a trip hazard. And thanks again to DennisO22 becaue now we all know the difference between helical and spiral stairs, and can amaze and dumbfound our friends!

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  • obillo commented on a-morpheus's instructable Undead Pan

    Another FYI: Smooth interior is the hallmark of older cast iron, and it's what gave cast iron its reputation for superior heat retention (NOT conductivity). Modern stuff is nubbly-surfaced and I'm not sure why. Could be easier/cheaper to make; could be easier for modern cooks to use because it cools a little faster. As to value: yours is a "Cousances Cousances"--made by the original company, not made by LeCreuset, which puts its onw name on.

    FYI, Cousances was a 500-year old French company now owned by Le Creuset, which uses the original molds and patterns. This may be an odd piece as the company was mainly known for enameled pots, and your appears to be plain iron. There are many collectors of old cast iron pots and your may be worth a goodly sum.

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  • obillo commented on beul's instructable PICKPOX

    Adding divots or detents is a good idea. Also, why not offset or stagger clothespins to the left and then right and left again, like filie tabs?.Reading labels would be a cinch amd mmake snatching the wroing one, or two at a time, less likely.

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  • Tlan: As I noted earlier, this is a good explanation. One reason many people are confused about this is that most if not all adobe houses do not look as if they are built with adobe bricks. That's because, in all example I've seen, the house exterior is finished with a smooth layer spread over the bricks, as is done with stucco. Rest assured that behind this mask is a lovely wall of adobe bricks!

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  • Great salvage, great construction, thing of beauty. But dangerous! All helical (thank you, DennisO22!) stairs are risky but this one is especially so. Can't be sure, but the treads seem pretty narrow, significantly reducing one of the few precautions you can take on these stairs: always step on the outside of the the curve. Treads also seem extra thick, another hazard, if a lesser one. Please add a handrail. Relying on the center post or the wall to save you is fine--until you fall. Also it presumes you will always have both hands free. Kids should never be allowed near this thing. (Building inspectors, too, in most areas.)

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