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  • Zoom Meetings Physical Mute Button

    Interesting - I wasn't aware of the V-USB library and wouldn't have thought it possible.So you can probably do it with the Nano, but although the Pro Micro is slightly more expensive, by the time you've added a USB socket and several discrete components it'll work out cheaper and a good bit less trouble. (The USB socket on the Nano is connected through a separate USB-Serial adapter chip which can't be used as a HID device as far as I know.)

    It's only connected to a PA system for an hour on a Sunday. Your experience is not ours.

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  • Zoom Meetings Physical Mute Button

    Yeah, but in other locations and other contexts they may serve a useful purpose. I don't see why Alt-S needs to produce a ding when the equivalent GUI operation doesn't.

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  • Zoom Meetings Physical Mute Button

    I find that the Zoom keyboard shortcuts provoke a Windows "ding", which the equivalent graphical functions don't. This is a problem for us as we're holding multi-mode services at church with a split congregation between church and Zoom. The church sound system (microphones and speakers) are effectively the Zoom mic and speaker, so that church is just another Zoom participant, and remote participants can interact and take part on an equal basis to those in church.These Windows dings, then, come across loud and clear across the church, often just as the pianist has started to play, as I press Alt-S to share the hymn words which I've just displayed on the screen. Very annoying.Has anyone else had this problem, or found a work-around?

    Sorry, it won't work with a Nano as it only has a simple USB/Serial chip - you can't make it emulate a keyboard. You need a Pro Micro, which is what I used in my USB Volume Control. The Pro Micro is a little more expensive but nevertheless it's not going to break the bank.

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  • Zoom Meetings Physical Mute Button

    A brilliant project - I need one! In fact my USB Volume Control and Capslock Led could be easily modified to do the same thing. It uses the Arduino Pro Micro which has enough pins for several buttons. When hosting meetings I also use Alt-S for share/unshare screen, Alt-F for full screen and Alt-C for cloud record. I just need a suitable box .. .. an audio cassette box might just do.

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  • Electromagnetic Pendulum

    @peter_balch is probably right about using a germanium transistor for single cell operation and his reasoning re Vbe is correct, though with enough turns on the coil it’d work with silicon. You can still find germanium transistors on eBay, mainly PNP, for which as Peter says you’d have to reverse the polarity of the battery otherwise you’d probably blow the transistor instantly.But a thought occurs to me. Supposing you replaced the pendulum bearing by a short length of springy wire, allowing it to swing not just left to right but in any plane. In theory it ought then to work as a Foucault’s pendulum, the plane of swing remaining constant as the earth rotates under it. If you then give it a circular base you can mark it with the hours like a sun dial. Would it work? It certainly ought to, …

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    @peter_balch is probably right about using a germanium transistor for single cell operation and his reasoning re Vbe is correct, though with enough turns on the coil it’d work with silicon. You can still find germanium transistors on eBay, mainly PNP, for which as Peter says you’d have to reverse the polarity of the battery otherwise you’d probably blow the transistor instantly.But a thought occurs to me. Supposing you replaced the pendulum bearing by a short length of springy wire, allowing it to swing not just left to right but in any plane. In theory it ought then to work as a Foucault’s pendulum, the plane of swing remaining constant as the earth rotates under it. If you then give it a circular base you can mark it with the hours like a sun dial. Would it work? It certainly ought to, though you might have to scale it up to give it a much heavier pendulum (not just wood) to have sufficient momentum to overcome any residual tendency to swing in a preferred plane.Nice project though.

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  • How to Service a Sewing Machine

    You're welcome - glad you found it useful!

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  • How to Service a Sewing Machine

    I'm sorry, I don't hink I can help you on that. you probably need to consult a professional sewing machine technician.

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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    Hmm... hard to know what to suggest. But if it's truly reading zero then that implies the Arduino isn't communicating with the HX711 properly rather than a problem with the load cells or their wiring - maybe the pin numbers are wrong or one of the Arduino pins is dead (less likely). You double-checked everything, didn't you? Now check it again, having put it aside for a few days. If you're still puzzled, try explaining it all to your granny - she might not understand a word of it (though some amazing grandmothers might!) but the process of explaining it to someone else often turns on the light bulb in your head.

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  • How to Add an E-Ink Display to Your Project

    I'm sorry I don't understand your question, and in any case I don't think it's very relevant to this project. I'm sure you will find other projects on Instructables which will help you work out the answer yourself.Lamento não ter entendido sua pergunta e, de qualquer forma, não acho que seja muito relevante para este projeto. Tenho certeza que você encontrará outros projetos no Instructables que ajudarão você a descobrir a resposta.

    Thank you, yes, they're very nice for certain niche applications where you only need to update them occasionally.Do come back and share a picture of your next project when you have it working.

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    • How to Add an E-Ink Display to Your Project
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  • How to Service a Sewing Machine

    I'm sorry, but it's not really possible to give you any advice without seeing it. Your best bet might well be to consult a professional sewing machine repairer.

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  • How to Service a Sewing Machine

    The main thing is simply to remove all dust and fluff from wherever you can see it, then oil the machine - there's very little chance of doing any damage. Step 7 describes how to check the timing but it's not likely to be out, and if it is, you need a professioal repairer. Check the bobbin tension as in Step 4. Also, make sure you've threaded the machine correctly - if you haven't used it for a while it's very easy to get it wtong. If you don't have the instructions, search online for "how to thread a sewing machine" and select the video that looks most like your machine.There's a little more detail in an expanded version of this Instructable at https://wiki.restarters.net/Sewing_machines

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  • A Software-Defined Radio on a Shoestring

    Agreed, a receiver is only as good as the aerial you connect to it, but if it's only a shoestring radio then the best aerial in the world isn't going to turn it into anything to get excited about. The point of this Instructable was simply to introduce the concept and some of its possibilities at low cost and by exploring reasonably strong signals.To get you started over a wide range of frequencies then a simple aerial like I show is fine, but if you have a particular fewquency band in mind then make it a quarter wavelength if you reasonable can. Use one of @mcshrade's calculators or simply divide 300 by the frequency in MHz to get the wavelength in metres. Placing it high up or away from obstacles will probably make more difference than getting the length right.

    Lo siento pero no sé la respuesta. Lea https://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-quick-start-guide/ cuidadosamente, incluyendo los comentarios al final y tal vez pueda encontrar una pista. (Traducido del inglés por Google)

    If course, if you go for a device that comes with an antenna, them certainly use that! But on a shoestring budget, the cheapest ones come without.

    SDR isn't a protocol but a design methodology which you can apply to a transmitter just as well as to a receiver. Given a sufficiently powerful processor, software can (in principle) create any waveform you like. You then only have to feed it into a power amplifier and hence to a transmitting aerial. But obviously, a DVB-T tuner is incapable of transmitting.

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    • A Software-Defined Radio on a Shoestring
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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    Thanks for pointing it out - it should be fixed now though you might have to refresh the page.

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  • Equalised Headphone Amp for Hearing Impaired

    I've just listed the 4 spare bare boards on eBay. See https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/184207745645

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    • Equalised Headphone Amp for Hearing Impaired
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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    Sounds like a great idea! I hope it works out well.

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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    Firstly it'll obviously depend on the accuracy of your calibration weight, but beyond that there are several factors to consider such as non-linearity, hysteresis and temperature effects. Google for Load Cell Accuracy and you'll find plenty of info to guide you.

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  • How to Service a Sewing Machine

    I'm sorry, I can't help you there. A quick Google search indicates that Gritzner is a very long established firm, probably German, and from your picture, very heavy and solidly made, predating the cheap ones with plastic parts, and so well worth servicing.The mechanism is likely to be similar to mine (as shown in the Instructable) so servicing shoud be very similar. The lower bobbin might be different though. The main thing you need to work out is how to thread it, and you should be able to find plenty of generic instructions on the Internet for similar vintage machines.In short, a heavy session with Google might be required which should give you usable generic instructions if not the ones for your precise model.

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  • USB Volume Control and Caps Lock LED - Simple, Cheap, Extensible

    The Pro Micro can sometimes be a bit tricky to program. The problem is that there are at least 2 versions of the bootloader and not all require that you press the reset button. Try a single press, or no press. Try a different USB port on your computer. It could even be that the device you've got hasn't got a bootloader at all.If it still doesn't work it just means you'll have to fall back on Method 2 or Method 3 (Step 7). Search eBay for AVR ISP and you'll find a programmer for just a few pounds.

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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    Yes, of course it would! But it's beyond the scope of this project to show you how.Look on ebay for Arduino LCD Moduleand you'll find several types, all very cheap.The cheapest are 16 character by 2 line or (20 by 4) modules which require 7 Arduino pins to drive them. That may not leave enough left for the HX711 module plus a couple of pins for push buttons you'll probably want. For just a little more you can get the same thing with a little adapter attached allowing you to drive it as an I2C (or IIC) device, using only 2 pins.Alternatively for a similar price you can get a 128x64 pixel graphic OLED module which can display characters of various sizes and simple monochrome graphics, and again uses IIC with only 2 Arduino pins. But at a little under an inch square, the display is quite sm…

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    Yes, of course it would! But it's beyond the scope of this project to show you how.Look on ebay for Arduino LCD Moduleand you'll find several types, all very cheap.The cheapest are 16 character by 2 line or (20 by 4) modules which require 7 Arduino pins to drive them. That may not leave enough left for the HX711 module plus a couple of pins for push buttons you'll probably want. For just a little more you can get the same thing with a little adapter attached allowing you to drive it as an I2C (or IIC) device, using only 2 pins.Alternatively for a similar price you can get a 128x64 pixel graphic OLED module which can display characters of various sizes and simple monochrome graphics, and again uses IIC with only 2 Arduino pins. But at a little under an inch square, the display is quite small.For either type there are Arduino libraries available which make them easy to drive. The libraries also include examples. When you've decided which type you want to go with a bit of research online should throw up Instructables or other website that'll help you. Have fun - lots of it!

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  • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales

    See Step 4: How to use 3-wire load cells. Connect the 4 together as described.

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  • You need to tackle this logically. It could be a problem with the foot pedal, or with the motor, or the sewing machine mechanism. First of all, I take it the humming noise comes from the sewing machine, not the foot pedal. Does it change in intensity or pitch as you progressivly press the foot pedal? That wolud tend to absolve the foot pedal, but not completely, so don't rule it out.Can you turn the machine mechanism freely by hand by turning the wheel on the end? If you can't, or only with difficulty, then it would indicate a mechanical jam. If you can turn it freely but it doesn't turn the mechanism, and the humming sound is like the motor running, and running faster as you press the pedal harder then it's something very simple: there may be a clutch mechanism to disengage the motor fro…

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    You need to tackle this logically. It could be a problem with the foot pedal, or with the motor, or the sewing machine mechanism. First of all, I take it the humming noise comes from the sewing machine, not the foot pedal. Does it change in intensity or pitch as you progressivly press the foot pedal? That wolud tend to absolve the foot pedal, but not completely, so don't rule it out.Can you turn the machine mechanism freely by hand by turning the wheel on the end? If you can't, or only with difficulty, then it would indicate a mechanical jam. If you can turn it freely but it doesn't turn the mechanism, and the humming sound is like the motor running, and running faster as you press the pedal harder then it's something very simple: there may be a clutch mechanism to disengage the motor from the sewing mechanism while winding spools. The instruction manual should tell you how to reengage it.It could be a problem with the motor itself or the belt. Unlike my machine (and many older ones), from what I can make out the motor is totally enclosed in the outer shell of the sewing machine. You'll need to work out how to expose it. Check the drive belt s ok and isn't slipping - it should be tight but not too tight.Take a look at the Electric Motors page in the Restart Wiki which gives the principles of operation and some indications of how to fix common faults.

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  • I've never used a HID Bluetooth module so I can't advise. Widen your search a little and look for Bluetooth keyboard or mouse projects and you might be able to piece together what you need.

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  • I'm sorry but I don't know anything about LABview. Googe is your friend. The key to getting the right answer out of Google is to ask the right question.

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  • See Step 8. The last paragraph tells you how to get the scale factor (or calibration). Or did I misunderstand your question?

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  • Hi, yes it should work jusy as well with any old Pi.

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  • I don't know anything about that board library - no doubt you could get it to work (maybe you've used it successfully before on other projects), but I suggest you download the Digispark library by including http://digistump.com/package_digistump_index.json in your additional boads manager URLs in Preferences. Then choose the Digispart (Default 16.5MHz) as the board. That should work. (I'll update the Instructable.)

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  • It says your sketch is using 2264 bytes of program storage but the maximum is 2048. I've just recompiled it and mine is using 2198 bytes - I've probably got a slightly different version of the IDE or libraries.It looks like you're using an ATTiny25. You need an ATTiny45 which has 4096 bytes or an ATTiny85 with 8192 bytes. The difference in cost isn't worth bothering about.

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  • Very easily sorted. You see the box at the bottom where it says 300 baud? Click on the down arrow next to it and select 38400 baud. This must match the line Serial.begin(38400); in setup() in the sketch.The baud rate is the rate in bits per second that data is transmitted to and from the serial connection. Both ends must agree or the data appears as garbage, as you saw.

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  • I'd agree with U04601 and throbscottle that wire wrapping has much to commend it. Back in the 1980's, using wire wrapping prototyping boards I wire wrapped a fairly complicated interface board (interfacing a paper tape reader, paper tape punch, RS232 port and cassette tape) and my first 2 (Motorola 6800 series) computers, the first (photo attached - sorry you can't see all the wires underneath) with a massive 64k of dynamic RAM with hand-crafted row and column address multiplexing and timing. My wife used to refer to my "knitting"!For small scale work I guess you can get away with using standard pin headers, but as throbscottle points out, the sharp corners of proper wire wrapping pins cut into the wire to form micro welds which are much more reliable than solder joints.

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  • p_leriche commented on RobBest's instructable Analog Digital Clock

    Ah yes, I missed those extra pics.Very nicely wired up - I just LOVE all those coloured wires! I take it they're just soldered direct to the LED legs.I found the simulator in MPLAB absolutely indispensable - it meant I could completely debug the code for my Raspberry Pi intelligent MIDI interface (except the i2c slave, which was surprisingly hard) before going anywhere near a real PIC. But I found PIC assembler pretty horrid - an instruction set clearly designed by an engineer, not a programmer. In retrospect, MSP430 probably would have been much nicer to program.

    Good to see an Instructable contributor actually giving schematics instead of just "connect this wire from here to there..."! I'd like to see one or two photos to show your methods of construction and wiring though.I have a 60 pixel Neopixel ring which I used in my Small Hadron Collider and which I've been meaning to do something similar with for a long time. (I'll probably make it alternately collide hadrons and tell the time.) I've also used the PIC in a couple of projects but a disadvantage for many people is that a PicKit generally costs a lot more than a PIC! (I got one relatively cheap on eBay.) I used assembler but JAL looks interesting. I wonder what tool chain you used and whether it also supports Arduino?

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  • A Google search threw up this video:It seems that under the lid on the top you can insert one of a selection of cams for doing zigzag stitching and embroidery. Without a cam in at all I suspect the needle position arm might move sideways as you observe. Hopefully one or more cams came with the machine, or if not, you can set it to straight stitch if you don't need to do anything fancy.

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  • Two years later, I get this tree out of the loft and find that the Neopixel ring has failed - only the first pixel works. That was a cheap Far Eastern one. Since Christmas is fast approaching I had to order a genuine Adafruit replacement and I'm now back in business.From a bit of research on the web it seems that the quality of Neopixels is very variable - it may be a false economy to go fore the cheap ones. But even the genuine ones don't have an untarnished record.

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  • Older laptops with user replaceable batteries aren't hard to take apart. You'll need some decent screwdrivers and a jimmy (https://www.ifixit.com/Store/Tools/Jimmy/IF145-259-1) to prise open the case. Check out ifixit.com for a repair guide, or youtube for a repair video. Usually it's not the hinge that's broken but it's attachment to the plastic case. Have a go - you can do it! And the sense of achievement will set you up for a week!

    Loads of people just want to do light Internet browsing and email, and an old laptop is perfectly capable of that, and if you also fit an SSD it'll run very nicely indeed. If you're gaming or video editing or running multiple VMs then yes, you will need all the power you can get, but for most people it's wasted. I'm writing this on a Lenovo X201 with SSD which I bought 2nd hand 5 years ago and I'll probably upgrade next year not because I need more power but because Win7 support will be running out.

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  • Nice! But there's possibly a simpler way of doing it. There's a Bluetooth module widely available on eBay called KRC-86B which has an auxiliary input. This is piped directly through to the output until a Bluetooth connection is made, whereupon that goes to the output instead. So your record player is normally connected to the amp but you only have to turn on Bluetooth on your phone to play that instead. That would eliminate your switch - and unfortunately, the need for a lovely box to put it in with which to display your ingenuity and craftsmanship!

    Sorry about that! Anyway, it's given you the bug, which is the main thing. Having created a few Instructables, I'm afraid my slightly cynical view is that it's a pretty box that gets noticed round here, even if it's got rubbish inside (unlike yours, of course!) Ingenuity and originality unfortunately seems to count for less.

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  • p_leriche commented on Hans_Daniel's instructable Tube Audio Amplifier

    Of course. The big reservoir capacitor in the power supply, in particular, would need gently nudging back into the world of the living!

    Did you read the "be nice" policy? Not trying to be smart - this is a good project. Perhaps you'd like to point out the negative feedback loop if you can see one and we'll all learn something today.

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  • Laptop batteries don't usually pop open as easily as that, and often you crack the plastic. I have a little bottle that I've had for years labelled Loctite Detach Glue Remover which softens the glue if you put it on and leave it a minute or two to work. I've no idea where you get it these days. Acetone might work, or at least ease the job a little, or if you can find another product containing heterocyclic ketone it'll be the same as mine. (Acetone is a ketone, but not a heterocyclic one, whatever that means.)

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  • p_leriche commented on Hans_Daniel's instructable Tube Audio Amplifier

    @gm280 and others: You would probably find the classic Mullard book "Circuits for Audio Amplifiers" interesting. (Reproduced at https://www.scribd.com/doc/19400164/Mullard-Circui...This contains circuits and constructional details of various famous amplifiers including the Mullard 3-3 and 5-10 designs, and for each, interesting descriptions of the design decisions. I still have a 3-3 in the loft which I built in the 1960's together with a Heathkit bass reflex speaker, but I haven't switched it on in many years.

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  • No, the HX711 doesn't require any programming - you use it just as it is.

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  • Not quite sure what this metal plate is. Is it part of the bobbin case, or the plate the foot presses down on? Could be that you haven't reassembled it quite right, or you have the needle incorrectly fitted. Or you might have put the timing out. Try looking at a selection of YouTube videos about threading and adjusting the timing and you may be able to see what's wrong. If not, post a photo of it as the needle is on the point of striking the plate, and it may be clearer. A picture is worth 1,000 words!

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  • I'm sorry, I've only just seen your question. No, I'm afraid I don't know what brand it is and I've never found anything online about my specific machine either. Mine was rebranded by a sewing machine shop in the small town where I live.Is there a second plastic screw with a spring directly opposite it on the other side of the motor, both of them at the same end of the motor as the wires? These hold the carbon brushes in place which carry the electric current to the rotor. They're not adjustments and should simply be tightened sufficiently not to work loose. The brushes eventually wear down and can be replaced, if you can find the exact same sort. Take a look at he Electric Motors page on the Restart Wiki.

    I think I give just a little more detail in the version on the Restart Wiki at https://therestartproject.org/wiki/Sewing_machinesIf you still can't fix it and it's an older machine with metal rather than plastic gears then it would probably be well worth searching online for a sewing machine repair specialist local to yourself to look at it for you. More modern machines wear out quite quickly and aren't easily repaired.

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  • You're quite right and well spotted! Thank you - I've corrected it.

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    • Build a Better Raspberry Pi Power Button
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  • Yes, mine is very similar to that, differing only in one or two cosmetic details.For a scrap board, yes, a blow torch is probably much the easiest and quickest way but you might just have to be a little careful not to overheat things. With solder wick I find it's essential to use a flux pen such as this otherwise it doesn't work at all and you often have to add a little solder to get the existing solder to melt.I suspect the solder you got on eBay is actually leaded, but don't worry about it - I've been using it for around 60 years and the only harm it's done me is to cause me to become adicted to electronics!

    You can see my heated desolder tool in action at https://youtu.be/aSiROw1GK_w

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  • I think the reason you often need to add solder in order to make the existing solder melt is not because of poor heat conduction so much as because what's already there is usually lead-free with a higher melting point. Your leaded solder alloys with the lead-free, helping it to melt.You should also mention solder wick (you need to use it with a flux pen to work well) and a solder sucker. I recently got a heated solder sucker which works brilliantly but some reviewers on Amazon found it failed fairly quickly, without saying what the problem was.

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  • Nice Instructable. I might have missed something, but I was left with a couple of questions:What sort of thread do you use?What do you use the rubber cement for?

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  • On the copper side, cut the copper tracks at the positions marked by red dots. Use a craft knife to remove a short length of track, just sufficient to make quite sure there are no remaining bridges of copper across the gap.

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  • I'm afraid I can't undertake to give you individual tuition but there are lots of books and tutorials covering Arduino which will give you all the skills you need. This one looks good:https://www.instructables.com/class/Arduino-Class/Then, a Google search for "How to blah blah blah" will usually get you going if you get stuck.I'll maybe do an Instructable on how to read several push buttons with a single analogue input port but I've got several projects to finish off first. Follow me if you like.

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  • Hi Paul - That should work, assuming you have enough pins having discounted 2 for the USB interface. The ATTiny85 is used in the Hidiot (hidiot.com) which is definitely capable of emulating a keyboard or mouse, and also I believe in the Trinket from Adafruit.(If you were short of pins for the buttons maybe you could connect them all to an analogue input through different resistors, with a single resistor to Vcc. Choosing the button resistors as powers of 2 (1, 2, 4, 8k) you should get a unique voltage at the analogue input for every different combination of buttons.)

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  • The wires for wiring up the stripboard? Any old hook-up wire - whatever you've got that'll go through the holes. Solid is easier to work with than stranded and stays in place better.

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  • I find blu-tac works better than sticky tape and has the advantage that if you use only half the sheet, you can fold it over onto itself to keep the screws very safe if you're not able to complete the reassembly immediately. Any odd bits of blu-tac stuck to the screw thread are easily removed by dabbing the screw on a lump of blu-tac - it likes sticking to itself more than it does to screws.If you're following one of the iFixit step by step guides, a good scheme is to stick the screws to lumps of blu-tac and then write the step number against each.In the case of very small screws such as used in an iPhone a better option is to use a set of pill boxes as is often used by the elderly and those with chronic conditions. You can get a set of 7 in a tray, each with 4 compartments labelled Morni…

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    I find blu-tac works better than sticky tape and has the advantage that if you use only half the sheet, you can fold it over onto itself to keep the screws very safe if you're not able to complete the reassembly immediately. Any odd bits of blu-tac stuck to the screw thread are easily removed by dabbing the screw on a lump of blu-tac - it likes sticking to itself more than it does to screws.If you're following one of the iFixit step by step guides, a good scheme is to stick the screws to lumps of blu-tac and then write the step number against each.In the case of very small screws such as used in an iPhone a better option is to use a set of pill boxes as is often used by the elderly and those with chronic conditions. You can get a set of 7 in a tray, each with 4 compartments labelled Morning, Afternoon, Evening, Bedtime for the 7 days of the week. Keep a note of which compartment contains the screws from which step, e.g. "Wed Bed: Step 12". Fully disassembling an iPhone I think I got up to about Thursday Afternoon with all the screws!If you don't have any pill boxes, then egg boxes are a good alternative for up to a dozen different sets of screws. You can number the compartments with a felt tip pen or write a step number in each.

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    • How to Build Arduino Weighing Scales
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  • A USB port will deliver an amp, which is a lot for a tiny battery like that. Some people may charge it from a USB charger capable of delivering 2 Amps or more. Many people will use this as a reading light in bed and may charge it with a bedside USB charger which they also use to charge their smartphone. Bed covers provide a ready source of fuel for a fire. The energy stored in it certainly isn't "infinitesimal" - almost certainly at least as much as in a glowing cigarette end, and plenty of fires have been started by cigarette ends. Loads of people have got away with carelessly discarding cigarette ends, and plenty of people will get away with this, but sooner or later someone may have a very bad day! The proper thing to do is to complain loudly and publicly to Moleskine about…

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    A USB port will deliver an amp, which is a lot for a tiny battery like that. Some people may charge it from a USB charger capable of delivering 2 Amps or more. Many people will use this as a reading light in bed and may charge it with a bedside USB charger which they also use to charge their smartphone. Bed covers provide a ready source of fuel for a fire. The energy stored in it certainly isn't "infinitesimal" - almost certainly at least as much as in a glowing cigarette end, and plenty of fires have been started by cigarette ends. Loads of people have got away with carelessly discarding cigarette ends, and plenty of people will get away with this, but sooner or later someone may have a very bad day! The proper thing to do is to complain loudly and publicly to Moleskine about what appears to be a nice product on the outside but apparently is rubbish inside.

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  • DON'T DO THIS! Bypassing the protection circuit is a fire hazard, and if your insurance company found out what you'd done you'd be on your own. The author says they left it on charge for an extended period without it getting hot. They were lucky.Another Instructable shows you how to replace the battery protection IC but doesn't fully resolve the question as to why these things fail in the first place.From that Instructable it's plain that the electronics in these things is rubbish (to put it politely). Lithium batteries are supposed to be charged according to a strict protocol, whereas this book light simply shovels electrons in until the protection IC calls foul. There are no inductors on the circuit board. A properly designed rechargeable light would contain one inductor in the chargi…

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    DON'T DO THIS! Bypassing the protection circuit is a fire hazard, and if your insurance company found out what you'd done you'd be on your own. The author says they left it on charge for an extended period without it getting hot. They were lucky.Another Instructable shows you how to replace the battery protection IC but doesn't fully resolve the question as to why these things fail in the first place.From that Instructable it's plain that the electronics in these things is rubbish (to put it politely). Lithium batteries are supposed to be charged according to a strict protocol, whereas this book light simply shovels electrons in until the protection IC calls foul. There are no inductors on the circuit board. A properly designed rechargeable light would contain one inductor in the charging circuit and another in the LED driver. The extra cost would be a very small fraction of the retail price.

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  • Nice Instructable - well done!I spent a long time unsuccessfully trying to get Amazon Alexa to work through a school proxy. The trouble is there's the system settings in /etc/environment, and the Gnome proxy settings, as well as the settings apt uses, and Java uses yet another setting which I haven't totally cracked. Have you any idea which settings, if any, this might respect? (However, I think I'm close to bypassing the problem with a hack on the firewall which protects the school network from the Pi network, by automatically redirecting all web traffic through the school proxy. Http was easy but https is a lot harder.)

    Nice Instructable - well done!I spent a long time trying unsucessfully to get Amazon Alexa on a Pi to run through a school proxy. The trouble is there's the system settings in /etc/environment, and the Gnome proxy settings, as well as the settings apt uses, and Java uses yet another setting which I haven't totally cracked. Have you any idea which settings, if any, this might respect? (However, I think I'm close to bypassing the problem with a hack on the firewall which protects the school network from the Pi network, by automatically redirecting all web traffic through the school proxy. Http was easy but https is a lot harder.)

    Nice Instructable - well done!I spent a long time unsuccessfully trying to get Amazon Alexa to work through a school proxy. The trouble is there's the system settings in /etc/environment, and the Gnome proxy settings, as well as the settings apt uses, and Java uses yet another setting which I haven't totally cracked. Have you any idea which settings, if any, this might respect? (However, I think I'm close to bypassing the problem with a hack on the firewall which protects the school network from the Pi network, by automatically redirecting all web traffic through the school proxy. Http was easy but https is a lot harder.)

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  • Glad you found it useful - happy sewing, and thanks for stopping by!

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  • Glad you liked it, and thanks for dropping by to say so!

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  • Unfortunately it looks like this may not be possible. The speaker volume is intercepted by the operating system which actions it, but it seems like the mic mute is passed through to the current application (if any), which may or may not be listening for it or even support it. Just possibly it might work if you're using a USB headset, but it's a long shot.

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  • Try Consumer.write(HID_CONSUMER_MICROPHONE_CA);I'm not very sure though whether that will do it. It may be a question of whether a particular application responds to that control. Anyway, let us know how you get on!

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  • Glad you liked it, and thanks for stopping by to say so. Have fun!Kind regards - Philip

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  • At therestartproject.org we very frequently fix headphones with around 90% success rate but more usually with a replacement plug which you can get quite cheaply. Most replacements are bulkier than the original though, and make sure it's got a cable clamp or it won't last long at all. You need to use the continuity tester to see which colour wire goes to which jack contact as the wire colours in step 4 aren't universal.An interesting idea to use heat shrink sleeving, but it may not stop the connections from breaking if the lead is given a yank. I'd prefer to use Sugru (see sugru.com). Sugru is also good for protecting the lead when the outer sheath starts to fail but before the earphones stop working.The wire can be a little tricky to solder. First of all, twist the strands together to sto…

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    At therestartproject.org we very frequently fix headphones with around 90% success rate but more usually with a replacement plug which you can get quite cheaply. Most replacements are bulkier than the original though, and make sure it's got a cable clamp or it won't last long at all. You need to use the continuity tester to see which colour wire goes to which jack contact as the wire colours in step 4 aren't universal.An interesting idea to use heat shrink sleeving, but it may not stop the connections from breaking if the lead is given a yank. I'd prefer to use Sugru (see sugru.com). Sugru is also good for protecting the lead when the outer sheath starts to fail but before the earphones stop working.The wire can be a little tricky to solder. First of all, twist the strands together to stop them fraying, then feed the twisted bundle into a blob of molten solder on the tip of your iron. Withdraw and repeat until the wire is tinned. The trouble with using a lighter is that you have little control of the length of wire that is bared of insulation.

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  • You're right - I'm sorry I'd forgotten that I'd had to install additional board descriptions from a SparkFun Github repository. This url gives you the files and very clear instructions:https://github.com/sparkfun/Arduino_BoardsHave fun!

    Make sure you have a recent version of the Arduino IDE. Under Tools -> Board -> Boards Manager, select Type: All and search for pro micro. It should be in SparkFun AVR Boards, but you have to read the list of boards supported by the package fairly carefully to spot it.Setting it as a Leonardo might work but if it doesn't you'll probably kill the bootloader and then have to use ISP programming. The Pro Micro (and probably Leonardo) can be a bit finicky in that respect. The Leonardo indeed uses the same processor, but there are fuse bits which set certain low level processor options and I'm not certain these are exactly the same.

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    • USB Volume Control and Caps Lock LED - simple, cheap, extensible
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