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  • LED Chaser Circuit Without IC

    *augh* No, I wasn't meaning to use a sock-puppet. I have a couple of different Gmail accounts that I use for various reasons and I didn't realize I'd logged into here with the other one.

    *augh* No, I wasn't meaning to use a sock-puppet with the reply "I would say anytime you've "integrated" more than one part..." I have a few Gmail accounts for various purposes that are similar in name and I didn't realize I'd logged in to here with a different one.

    "Millions"? *waving hand* That's so twentieth century. Try billions and even trillions :)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor_countLooks like the Dual-Core Itanium 2 was the first to top one billion transistors in 2006 but if we're talking resistors, diodes, caps, etc, the Itanium 2 McKinley may have topped the one-billion mark in 2002 (had around 200 million transistors) and the Itanium 2 with 9MB cache in 2004 had around 600 million transistors. Just all depends on how many non-transistor parts needed to be on the chip for every transistor.But the current record holders are: "As of 2019, the largest transistor count in a commercially available microprocessor is 39.54billion MOSFETs, in AMD's Zen 2 based Epyc Rome, which is a 3D integrated circuit (with eight dies in a…

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    "Millions"? *waving hand* That's so twentieth century. Try billions and even trillions :)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor_countLooks like the Dual-Core Itanium 2 was the first to top one billion transistors in 2006 but if we're talking resistors, diodes, caps, etc, the Itanium 2 McKinley may have topped the one-billion mark in 2002 (had around 200 million transistors) and the Itanium 2 with 9MB cache in 2004 had around 600 million transistors. Just all depends on how many non-transistor parts needed to be on the chip for every transistor.But the current record holders are: "As of 2019, the largest transistor count in a commercially available microprocessor is 39.54billion MOSFETs, in AMD's Zen 2 based Epyc Rome, which is a 3D integrated circuit (with eight dies in a single package) fabricated using TSMC's 7 nm FinFET semiconductor manufacturing process.[1][2] As of 2020, the highest transistor count in a graphics processing unit (GPU) is Nvidia's GA100 Ampere with 54billion MOSFETs, manufactured using TSMC's 7 nm process.[3] As of 2019, the highest transistor count in any IC chip was Samsung's 1TB eUFS (3D-stacked) V-NAND flash memory chip, with 2trillion floating-gate MOSFETs (4bits per transistor).[4] As of 2020, the highest transistor count in any IC chip is a deep learning engine called the Wafer Scale Engine 2 by Cerebras, using a special design to route around any non-functional core on the device; it has 2.6trillion MOSFETs, manufactured using TSMC's 7 nm FinFET process." (from the Wikipedia article.)

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  • Handheld BASIC Computer

    In the following paragraph:Both the 1284 and the 328 of course need code and the code I used can be found here: https://github.com/PlainOldAnders/HAL1284 under ArduinoSrc/src. I simply used the Arduino IDE for modifying and uploading the code but before that can be done, you'll need to burn bootloaders on the ICs:The link to Github has a period at the end (the actual link, not the text.) It goes to https://github.com/PlainOldAnders/HAL1284. and gives an error. It should be going to https://github.com/PlainOldAnders/HAL1284

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  • LED Chaser Circuit Without IC

    Probably since one transistor alone does not a circuit make. Now there ARE IC's in that form factor. Dallas temperature modules, for example .Anytime you need to make a block diagram on a datasheet, that implies there are MANY parts inside. So even if it's just a transistor and a resistor on the same chunk of silicone, it's an IC.

    I admire anyone who dead-bugs a circuit and winds up making it NOT look like the dead bug I may have scraped off my shoe. Unfortunately, with me, my dead-bugs not only look like they were stepped on by the whole River Dance cast, they look like they then hit the windshield of one of the (now retired) space shuttles.

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  • Booting Raspberry Pi 3 B With a USB Drive

    Yes, you are absolutely right that the if and of are backwards.However, that shouldn't have damaged your drives in any way. All it would have done was filled them up with a *HUGE* image file until it ran out of free space and aborted. Deleting the file would have then restored the free space again.

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  • See-Through Arduino UNO

    Will it play Doom? And where's the 555? There's supposed to be an Earth-shattering 555!

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  •  Optical Illusion Mirror!

    Ok, fair enough. I was just puzzled about it.

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  • Vehicle Presence Detection - Home Automation

    The following will help get the wifi lock the fastest:const char* ssid = "********";const char* password = "********";IPAddress staticIP(192,168,1,22);IPAddress gateway(192,168,1,9);IPAddress subnet(255,255,255,0);WiFi.persistent( false );WiFi.mode( WIFI_STA );WiFi.begin( WLAN_SSID, WLAN_PASSWD );You can also change the last line to the following to avoid the wifi scan and save even more time (but it's not as flexible as changing routers will mean it needs to be reprogrammed.)WiFi.begin( WLAN_SSID, WLAN_PASSWD, channel, ap_mac, true );

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  • Vehicle Presence Detection - Home Automation

    The uptime is working fine for me. The only issue has been if I start the car and then sit there for a while, such as when working on the car, or if I come home and turn the car off and then turn it back on for some reason. But I have it set with a minimum up-time of 10 mins before it decides I'm back home and that gives me plenty of time to start the car, turn on wipers, turn on heat, check mirrors or whatever else I may do and then pull on out in the morning. The one part that was a bit difficult was getting it to get connected quickly enough due to the range of the wireless so I turned off the wifi-scan and set a static IP so it'd connect faster. Then it just sends a MQTT message every second when/if it's connected. Node-red keeps an eye on those and if it sees one. it looks at the up-…

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    The uptime is working fine for me. The only issue has been if I start the car and then sit there for a while, such as when working on the car, or if I come home and turn the car off and then turn it back on for some reason. But I have it set with a minimum up-time of 10 mins before it decides I'm back home and that gives me plenty of time to start the car, turn on wipers, turn on heat, check mirrors or whatever else I may do and then pull on out in the morning. The one part that was a bit difficult was getting it to get connected quickly enough due to the range of the wireless so I turned off the wifi-scan and set a static IP so it'd connect faster. Then it just sends a MQTT message every second when/if it's connected. Node-red keeps an eye on those and if it sees one. it looks at the up-time. If it's < 10 mins, it turns stuff off and then ignores all MQTT messages for at least 10 mins (that way it's not sending out a msg to Alexa or Home Assistant every second.) If it sees an up-time >10 mins, it turns things on and then again ignores all messages for at least 10 mins.So when the car starts, the presence-device boots, (eventually) connects to wifi and MQTT and starts sending an incrementing counter. But the payload time is always from boot, not from connect time. It'd have to be powered-on for 9+ hours straight before it'd roll over/glitch (I used either int16_t or uint16_t. I forgot how.)

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  • Desktop Ring Clock

    Great idea with alternating the LEDs (before I saw that part, I was wondering how you were getting 2 circles like that as LED rings come in 12, 24, 60, etc.) Two suggestions: 1) Join the 5V and ground on both ends. On the DIN end, cut down between the 5V, DIN and G pads so you can fold back the 5V and G and jumper them but can keep the DIN free. Then two wires to jumper 5V and G back to the other end where the DIN and DOUT are joined (or just hook the power wires to the splice joint and the data wire to the DIN at the unspliced ends.)That way you don't have the power fading towards the end. With a longer strip or a lower-quality power supply, you can get fading towards the end with a full 60-LED strip unless you're feeding power to both ends.So If you move the power lines to the joint, yo…

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    Great idea with alternating the LEDs (before I saw that part, I was wondering how you were getting 2 circles like that as LED rings come in 12, 24, 60, etc.) Two suggestions: 1) Join the 5V and ground on both ends. On the DIN end, cut down between the 5V, DIN and G pads so you can fold back the 5V and G and jumper them but can keep the DIN free. Then two wires to jumper 5V and G back to the other end where the DIN and DOUT are joined (or just hook the power wires to the splice joint and the data wire to the DIN at the unspliced ends.)That way you don't have the power fading towards the end. With a longer strip or a lower-quality power supply, you can get fading towards the end with a full 60-LED strip unless you're feeding power to both ends.So If you move the power lines to the joint, you're feeding power into the end of two 30-LED strips or if you splice the DIN end back with power, you get power to both "ends" of the strip (just don't splice DIN and DOUT on both ends.)2) Don't cut them as 30-30 strips. Just cut 60 LEDs and then just fold it at the correct spot after #30. It may be a bit harder to get the adhesion started at the very start and also make sure they're lined up right but it avoids having to solder it back together again(you can take a razor knife or box cutter to carefully cut the backing paper at the right spot to be able to get it started.

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  • Wooden LED Gaming Display Powered by Raspberry Pi Zero

    Posting this as a new comment so it's more visible. I had asked about the thickness of the veneer and maketvee had responded that it's 0.1mm veneer and included some links to the European manufacturer and an European seller. Those links indicated that the veneer is 0.1mm (or about 7mil/0.007") but didn't state the paper thickness. Some searching for a source in the US yielded the following results:https://www.realwoodpaper.com/printable-wood-sheet... 10mil/0.25mm over-all thickness for the fleece-back and 16mil/0.4mm. Has sample packs available. Max size is 11"x17" Only 6 different woodshttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B016FM77SY/ref=twister_B...7mil/0.2mm+paper (paper thickness not known)https://www.veneersupplies.com/products/Paper-Back... 19mil 0.5mm overall thickness (rather t…

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    Posting this as a new comment so it's more visible. I had asked about the thickness of the veneer and maketvee had responded that it's 0.1mm veneer and included some links to the European manufacturer and an European seller. Those links indicated that the veneer is 0.1mm (or about 7mil/0.007") but didn't state the paper thickness. Some searching for a source in the US yielded the following results:https://www.realwoodpaper.com/printable-wood-sheet... 10mil/0.25mm over-all thickness for the fleece-back and 16mil/0.4mm. Has sample packs available. Max size is 11"x17" Only 6 different woodshttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B016FM77SY/ref=twister_B...7mil/0.2mm+paper (paper thickness not known)https://www.veneersupplies.com/products/Paper-Back... 19mil 0.5mm overall thickness (rather thick, comparatively)And there may be other sources, as well.Fleece-back is thinner than paper-back. Fleece-back seems to be around 0.03mm and paper-back is around 0.1mm (so for the same thickness wood, the overall thickness of wood+backing is thinner for fleece-back.)Also one source noted that pretty much anything thinner than 1/64" (0.39mm or 15mils) tends to be fairly translucent when back-lit. But that'd depend on the back-light intensity and also the backing. My thoughts: Fleece backing would allow more light through than paper-backed for the same thickness veneer as the fleece backing is not only thinner but it's more like a mesh.You can also get veneer that is two-layers of veneer where the grain of one layer goes horizontal and the other goes vertical (basically 2-layer plywood) but that's probably starting to get too thick. Also some paper backing is brown and some is white. White wouldn't change the colors but brown will (of course the wood will also change them some.) Don't get adhesive-backed because that's yet more thickness. Use a NON-water based adhesive (so the veneer doesn't swell and then shrink while the glue is drying) and spread it only on the dividers, not across the whole back of the veneer. Alternatively, glue the veneer (still NON-water-based) to the front or back of a piece of glass/plexiglass/acrylic. Gives it a LOT of strength and prevents warping (and you can always cover the side edges of the project with veneer to cover the glass.)And do NOT ̶t̶r̶y̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶h̶o̶m̶e̶ try this with "wood-textured/printed paper." Use REAL wood veneer. LEDs (or any strong light) will fade the colors of inks and you'll get bleached spots that will show even with the LEDs off. A light-colored wood veneer should be less susceptible to bleaching.

    "printed in some shiny filament"Two words: aluminum foil. Ok, FOUR words: glue and aluminum foil.The foil can be glued to the sides to reflect out more light but the foil doesn't need to be very flat to still make a good bit of difference. In fact, put some strips on the back as well after putting the LEDs in place (just be careful not to short out the strips or wiring.

    Hey, could you do a test photo of different thicknesses for us?Basically, just lay the display flat on a table. Set it to show full rows of different colors (each row one color.) Then lay down some sheets of the veneer where the first sheet covers all of the columns except one. Then another sheet that covers all but two and keep going till the light doesn't shine through much at all (so now there's one column with just the original one layer, another column with two layers, another with three, etc) and then take a picture.That way we can see "well, with X layers, we can still see some colors but with Y layers, it's pretty much nothing showing." Then if I find some 0.4mm stuff, for example, I can say "well, in the demo I can see that even six layers shows some coloring so t…

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    Hey, could you do a test photo of different thicknesses for us?Basically, just lay the display flat on a table. Set it to show full rows of different colors (each row one color.) Then lay down some sheets of the veneer where the first sheet covers all of the columns except one. Then another sheet that covers all but two and keep going till the light doesn't shine through much at all (so now there's one column with just the original one layer, another column with two layers, another with three, etc) and then take a picture.That way we can see "well, with X layers, we can still see some colors but with Y layers, it's pretty much nothing showing." Then if I find some 0.4mm stuff, for example, I can say "well, in the demo I can see that even six layers shows some coloring so the 0.4 will work fine" or "the demo shows at 0.3mm, it's pretty much not showing through so I'm out of luck."Of course, that's assuming you still have enough of the veneer laying around :)

    Their website shows it's actually not 0.1mm overall. It's 0.1mm wood and apparently around 0.1mm paper backing (modulor.de has double-sided that's two pieces glued back-to-back with an added piece of paper. It says the total thickness on that is 0.4mm-0.55mm.) So total thickness is around 0.2mm or around 6mils. Haven't found a US source for the Microwood brand yet, though, and it looks like modulor.de's shipping costs would be really high to ship to the US :(

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  • Wooden LED Gaming Display Powered by Raspberry Pi Zero

    For those others here in the US who aren't used to mm, that's about 3 mils or 0.003 inches (1/256th of an inch or so.) Literally "paper thin" as 20# paper is 0.004 inches and 24# paper is 0.0045 inches (no wonder the colors come through so well. As long as it's not backlit, the 0.1mm veneer would look pretty much the same as 1mm or thicker but it's the same as seeing a lady in a sheer dress with the sun behind her. You can see every detail.) Most copiers/printers use either 20 or 24# paper. Card stock is generally around 0.010-0.012". A quick Amazon search showed 10 mil veneer and thicker easily available but not sure about thinner. So finding this thin of veneer will definitely be a challenge. If I find a source, I'll post it in here.

    That has got to be some SUPER-thin veneer (laugh.) I didn't realize they can/do shave it thin enough to let light come through. Makes me rethink some project ideas.

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  • CNC Etch a Sketch (and Video Player)

    I love the turning of the etch-a-sketch into a CNC machine but I *really* admire the ones who do it manually.https://www.huffpost.com/entry/etch-a-sketch-anniversary_n_3581395

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  • prabbit237 commented on jedi1983's instructable Musical Hard Drives
    Musical Hard Drives

    I don't think soldering wires to your kids and connecting them to an amp will work quite as well. Or then again, maybe it'll work *better.* Are they good singers? The power from the amp should at least get them to jumping some. If ya have both a boy and a girl, then you have your bass and tweeter right there.

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  • Vehicle Presence Detection - Home Automation

    Much better method. Send an up-time message. If Home-Assistant gets a message with an up-time of less than a minute and then the device drops the connection, then Elvis has left the building. If the first message received has an up-time of >10 minutes (adjust as needed), the prodigal son has returned.

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  • And if you accidentally overwrote the bootloader? How about if you don't have a microUSB cable handy (unlikely but possible)? Or if you need the extra 1.5k of flash that's used by the bootloader?

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