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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    The HV supply can barely deliver a few microamps at 400V so it's not really dangerous that the lines are close to other signal lines :)

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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    I believe the screws I used were also 25mm. For the GM tube cover, I used 8mm. All screws are threaded into brass heat-set inserts. As for the voltage, yes, I had to adjust the potentiometer on the boost converter to get 430 volts. Please note that you can only measure the high voltage directly if you have a high-impedance meter or probe. Normal 10 M-Ohm meters will draw too much current and show a reduced voltage. One way to measure the voltage accurately is to construct a voltage divider. To do this, connect nine 10 M resistors in series (creating a 90M resistor) and connect one end of this series to the high voltage output. Use the multimeter to measure the voltage at the other end relative to ground. The reading from the multimeter should be multiplied by 10 to get the real voltage.

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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    I'm designing a version 2 of this with SMD components, 555 timer based HV generator, and a battery charging circuit. I'll make the schematic and other design files available for it once I have a working prototype.

    The 10M resistors are only used to build a voltage divider on a breadboard to measure the high voltage output. It doesn't go in the PCB.And yes, I removed the SD card slot and the screw terminals. Forgot to mention it in the post. I set the voltage to 430 V because it seemed to fluctuate a little at lower voltages. 430 is within the operating range of the Geiger tube.Let me know if there are any other questions!

    You will need M3 countersunk screws for the housing. Everything else is printed.

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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    https://lcsc.com/product-detail/Fuseholders_LS-601_C182321.htmlThis is the part number from LCSC. I'm not exactly sure of the dimensions

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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    Radiation high enough to fry the electronics would be well beyond the range of this device anyway :) This is not meant for measuring extreme amounts of radiation

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    • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen
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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    It's a resistive touchscreen, so it will work with any kind of surface.

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  • DIY Geiger Counter With an ESP8266 and a Touchscreen

    STS-5 is very similar to SBM-20, but a little bigger. Other tubes can definitely be used provided you adjust the high voltage supply according to the manufacturer's specs. I found the SBM-20 to have the best combination of size, sensitivity, and cost.

    Okay, first a few caveats about the PCBs I have. You'll need to make some minor changes to make it work, as shown in the picture in step 2. This has been fixed in the new design posted on Github. First, the HV boost converter can't be soldered to the board since the output polarity is flipped. Use jumper wires like in my picture. Second, the piezo speaker needs to be wired up with a transistor since the pin it is connected to can't supply enough current to drive it directly. The schematic shows how the transistor is wired, but you shouldn't need the 1K resistor. If you also want to 3D print the case, the battery holder listed here will be too big and will most likely prevent you from installing the bottom screws. I recommend using a different battery adapter or just using a smaller LiPo...

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    Okay, first a few caveats about the PCBs I have. You'll need to make some minor changes to make it work, as shown in the picture in step 2. This has been fixed in the new design posted on Github. First, the HV boost converter can't be soldered to the board since the output polarity is flipped. Use jumper wires like in my picture. Second, the piezo speaker needs to be wired up with a transistor since the pin it is connected to can't supply enough current to drive it directly. The schematic shows how the transistor is wired, but you shouldn't need the 1K resistor. If you also want to 3D print the case, the battery holder listed here will be too big and will most likely prevent you from installing the bottom screws. I recommend using a different battery adapter or just using a smaller LiPo battery and just soldering some JST connector leads to the battery pads.I'll PM you for your address details and shipping

    Thanks!Looks like the Mightyohm Geiger counter has a pulse output at 5V for each tube impulse event. If you used a logic level shifter to bring it down to 3.3V, that pulse could be used as the interrupt for the ESP and my code would still work. Unfortunately, I can't do a detailed design for it since I don't have a Mightyohm so I wouldn't be able to test anything.

    I do have a couple spares. Are you in the US?

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