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  • Tweaking Your Power Inverter, Get More Bang for the Buck

    Remember, if you are trying to get 1000 Watts output (for example), you will need at least 1.25 times that on the input to cover losses and startup surges. At 12 volts input, 1250 Watts is 104 Amps. (Watts = Volts x Amps) Are you sure your 12V source is capable of that?2500W output means about 3125 Watts input (peak) which is 260 Amps at 12 Volts input. DC wiring requirements are critical at these current levels. On a constant basis, most high quality inverters can be 90% efficient... but there is always a startup surge demand that may even exceed the 1.25 value I mentioned.

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  • psron commented on invisiblelight386's instructable Projector Bulb Conversion to LED1 year ago
    Projector Bulb Conversion to LED

    I re-read what I wrote, and remembered what I was thinking about... 10 year ago, I was trying to convert a pair of 10,000 lumen DPI Lightning projectors from Xenon 5,000 Watt lamp to a LEP plasma lamps... yet using the original Xenon lamp reflector. It's the parabolic reflector that requires a point light source... then the reflector turns that into an evenly distributed light field across the optics.

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  • Tweaking your Power inverter, get more bang for the buck

    NO... never, it will release the "magic smoke" from them... once that is released, they will not work any more.Here's why... Inexpensive inverters are what's called "asynchronous"... meaning that the AC output waveform is not "in-sync" with anything else... and they usually are not even exactly 60Hz (or 50Hz for non-North Americans). So when one inverters output is going up, the other may be going down... they will fight each other and... as mentioned, cause the release of abundant smoke.Only "grid-tie" inverters can be operated in parallel, because they "look at" the AC Mains signal phase, and synchronize their own output to be exactly in-phase (in step) with the AC Mains.

    AC Mains line voltage is specified as RMS... Root Mean Square... it's a Sine Wave function. Most inexpensive multimeters will read P-P, or Peak-to-Peak... the highest and lowest points of the AC waveform. The math to convert RMS to P-P is RMS x 1.414 (square root of 2); which results in 311V P-P for a 220V RMS sine wave.

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  • psron commented on HarnessedDevilry's instructable Spot Weld Anything (Even Copper)!2 years ago
    Spot Weld Anything (Even Copper)!

    555 timers don't output much current, and won't make a good multi-MOSFET gate driver. You MUST turn the MOSFET's "FULLY ON" in a VERRRY short time, or else the die thermal dissipation will exceed limits and release the internal supply of magic smoke, which can not be replaced, thereby leaving the MOSFET's in an innoperable state... and probably in shattered small pieces. Use a "High Power MOSFET Gate Driver" between the 555 timer and the MOSFET's... these use a half-H-bridge output that can supply several Amps to overcome the high Gate capacitance of large MOSFET's. Plan on utilizing many more than just 3 though... and use the latest-and-greatest available parts... with sub-milliOhm "Rds" (ON-resistance).Also, connecting BoostCaps in series adds their &q...

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    555 timers don't output much current, and won't make a good multi-MOSFET gate driver. You MUST turn the MOSFET's "FULLY ON" in a VERRRY short time, or else the die thermal dissipation will exceed limits and release the internal supply of magic smoke, which can not be replaced, thereby leaving the MOSFET's in an innoperable state... and probably in shattered small pieces. Use a "High Power MOSFET Gate Driver" between the 555 timer and the MOSFET's... these use a half-H-bridge output that can supply several Amps to overcome the high Gate capacitance of large MOSFET's. Plan on utilizing many more than just 3 though... and use the latest-and-greatest available parts... with sub-milliOhm "Rds" (ON-resistance).Also, connecting BoostCaps in series adds their "ESRdc" (internal resistances) in series... limiting the available Peak Current. Each caps has around 0.3milliOhms, so 4 of them in series gives you 1.2mOhm. But... this may be a moot point, since it's hard to keep all other connections to less than 10 times this value anyway.If you just consider the Caps alone (no external circuitry); 10V (4 caps in series) at 1.2mOhms (0.3mOhm x 4) "limits" you to 8333 Amps; whereas 2.5V (using them in parallel) at 0.075mOhms (0.3mOhms / 4) is 33,333 Amps. BUT... since the caps are only rated to 1900 Amps maximum current (repeatable, within spec), the series connection might serve to protect the caps. The mfr spec says that a single 3000F 2.7V cap has a "short circuit" current of around 9300 Amps though... so although they "can" provide 9300 Amps peak, it's not good on them!

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