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  • Turbulent Flow Christmas Ornaments

    Nice effect! I had to look up what rheoscopic fluid was. I don't know if rheoscopic fluid is effected by magnetism. If it is, this suggestion may not have any value.A possible modification might be to a mechanism similar to a magnetic stirrer used in labs. Put a magnet in the fluid, seal the fluid in and mount a motor with another magnet outside the sealed fluid positioned so the magnetic fields are coupled. The spinning motor and magnet will result in the magnet in the fluid agitating the solution. Agitators of different shapes could be attached to the magnet. Assuming the magnet in the fluid is adequately protected from damage by the fluid, the sealed fluid chamber should last until dropped :>) The motor/magnet assembly could use virtually any motor suitable to the task, and …

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    Nice effect! I had to look up what rheoscopic fluid was. I don't know if rheoscopic fluid is effected by magnetism. If it is, this suggestion may not have any value.A possible modification might be to a mechanism similar to a magnetic stirrer used in labs. Put a magnet in the fluid, seal the fluid in and mount a motor with another magnet outside the sealed fluid positioned so the magnetic fields are coupled. The spinning motor and magnet will result in the magnet in the fluid agitating the solution. Agitators of different shapes could be attached to the magnet. Assuming the magnet in the fluid is adequately protected from damage by the fluid, the sealed fluid chamber should last until dropped :>) The motor/magnet assembly could use virtually any motor suitable to the task, and would be replaceable/interchangeable as desired.Again, nice project. Thanks for sharing.rayj0007

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  • Cardboard Knife Switch

    Caution!! The issue is not only with voltage, but also with the amount of current being switched. A 6 volt car battery connected to a large load could create problems even though the it's only 6 volts. This switch presents a fire hazard if it's capacity is exceeded.Gotta say, I do like the look of knife switches.

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  • I'm not sure this comment applies to this process. It depends on the chemical composition of the glass you are using. In some other glass working activities, eye protection should provide protection from the specific wavelength light given off by heated sodium. Sunglasses and even shade 5 welding protection does not provide sufficient protection. Please investigate this process and take action to protect your eyes from ALL possible hazards.

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  • Color me cynical...... I have a hard time believing, given the value of personal information, that neither Autodesk nor Google are going to retain the information provided to use for some other purpose, besides mailing post cards.Is there a privacy policy that specifically applies to the information gathered?Thanks for the replies! I have nothing else to add to the conversation.

    Besides sending a postcard, what other uses will the information you collect be used for by you and/or Instructables and/or Google???Is there a privacy policy that is applied to the information you are collecting?

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  • That's what I was looking for!!!! I'll have to take a look at the "Globe Knot Cookbook".Thanks very much for this and the length equation.

    Nice 'able. Are you aware of any formula for selecting cord size and/or number of "plys" and/or number of facets given a specified sphere diameter?Example of failures: The example globe knot made of 1/2" cord around a golf ball or the example cord size globe knot placed on a bowling ball.Any info would be appreciated.Just an FYI: Looking at "The Ashley Book of Knots" this might be considered a "Monkey's Fist" rather than a "Turks Head", based on application. There seems to be a lot of overlap between the 2 types.

    How did you determine it would take 18 or 19 plys to cover the bowling ball? Is there an equation relating sphere diameter, cord diameter, to number of plys? For example if I wanted to cover a bowling ball with 1/2" cord, how can I calculate the minimum number of plys to assure coverage?Any equation relating the 3 variables would be helpful.

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  • Fun idea, thanks for sharing. For wider sticks, you might look at a thing doctors used to use, they were called "tongue depressors". I don't know if they still use them, I haven't seen one in years. Maybe they just use them on children.

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