Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
  • realife11 followed bryans workshop4 months ago
      • Old Bathroom Sink and Ceiling Upgrade!
      • Built-in Kitchen Shelves!
      • Epic Halloween Circus Themed Party!
  • realife11 commented on bryans workshop's instructable Shiratama Eyeball Drinks!4 months ago
    Shiratama Eyeball Drinks!

    WoW thanks!Excellent post and idea. Very nicely laid out with great pics and step-by-step easy instructions. Great job, you’ve got my vote. I can’t wait to try these. Do they easily float inside the glass sideways so you can see the iris, or does is sink or float?

    View Instructable »
  • Yellow Jacket Ground Nest Trap From 5 Gallon Water Bottle

    I think you misunderstood what he said.He said he “also” had a honey bee nest on the property that (because they are SO beneficial and endangered) he was leaving alone. As opposed to the jellow jackets that were dangerous and aggressive to have around.

    great idea! Since the bottle trick would not work for a deck, this is a good one to remember!!

    With all due respect, if you are killing yellow jackets (or ‘wasps’), then more power to ya, but if you are killing bees, you should think twice on that since they are becoming endangered, our own survival depends on them, and they are extremely beneficial to crops, all kind of pollination,etc. If you need to get rid of them if they become a problem, then you can call any beekeeper and most will come for free and take them away for you. Easy-Peasy.PS...for those reading this thread, Yellow Jackets are not bees. They are wasps.just sayin’ because some people mistakenly think they are bees.

    Good point, very true, beekeepers would not bother with bumbles, however on the upside, bumble bees are pretty docile and at the most would have a colony of 50 or less. I don’t think they would bother with humans though, they are more interested in getting that pollen, haha. They only become a nuisance when they start boring holes in your new wood gazebo to make a secluded nest. That happened to a relative, so they covered the holes with strips of copper which repelled and encouraged them to go “elsewhere”.Great tip on locating and popping out an inground yellow jacket nest.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on JacobP117's instructable Popcorn Ceiling Removal Tool6 months ago
    Popcorn Ceiling Removal Tool

    Thanks for the info! Would plain old joint compound to even out the popcorn work as good as plaster (I have a bunch of it to use up)? Then maybe paint “Kilz” over it before painting?Thanks.

    EXCELLENT! Thanks for the info. I’ll be getting one of those soon!

    Hi, this is a great idea! But one question if you might know? I just read that so e old popcorn ceilings “could” contain asbestos. Do you know how to tell if a popcorn ceiling is one of those, and would the shop vac be a good solution since it sucks it up immediately (I’m guessing hepa filter would be a plus?). Thanks hope you might be able help.Great job with the tutorial, thanks!!

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on ibeme78's instructable Epic Treehouse1 year ago
    Epic Treehouse

    Do these treehouses need to have permits since it’s structural and affixed to a tree? I read how you need permits for those tiny houses if its on your property, since its considered a living space, but wondered if tree houses need them too?

    View Instructable »
  • 37+ Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    I snore occasionally too, and found a device that stops it completely!Here are some pics of it, but I just used a stretchy hair head band, or you could probably use a long stretchy sock (or two together), tied to make a loop. Either way, it worked!!! Can't snore if my mouth can't open.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 11 Unusual Uses for Coffee1 year ago
    11 Unusual Uses for Coffee

    Right, glad you mentioned that ;-D that's the big one that most people learn about growing up (I forgot to list it).

    Actually, yes it can be dangerous. I too had not known about the danger of mixing bleach and vinegar or alcohol, until I came across the info by accident. It's absolutely true. Here's the google URL, many articles on it that explain the chemistry of it and exactly why it's dangerous. I would never post something I had not thoroughly researched first. Here's he google articles on it: https://www.google.com/search?sclient=tablet-gws&site=&source=hp&q=is+bleach+and+vinegar+dangerous%3F&oq=is+bleach+and+vinegar+dangerous%3F&gs_l=tablet-gws.12..0i22i30k1.4305.21305.0.26020.32.32.0.0.0.0.116.1386.29j3.32.0....0...1.1.64.tablet-gws..0.32.1376...0j0i131i46k1j46i131k1j0i131k1j0i10k1.LoRo3907eAQ

    Thanks :-D, good idea, I am glad you clarified that point ;-)I originally mentioned that I had read it was especially true when full strength undiluted bleach and vinegar are used. Most people probably use their common sense and dilute most chemicals, but I'm sure there are a few that think full strength is better.They really should teach this in grade school chemistry class. It's very useful information for when a person becomes an adult, and could prevent a lot of injuries.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on beado4ever's instructable How to Build a Deck1 year ago
    How to Build a Deck

    haha! Yes for a " Land of the free" we certainly get taxed for every little thing, and there seems to be fees for everything! I always imagine that there is a 'think tank' of corporate heads somewhere in an ominous castle, just thinking up ways to suck us dry of our money (Ha!).

    is the 18 inch hole deep enough to be below the frost line level?Someone told me that when he had a sunroom built off the back of his house, they didn't make the post holes deep enough and it was not below the frost line, so that when winter came, the freezing temperatures made the posts rise unevenly, causing the doors to not slide shut completely. There was always a slight gap. When the weather warmed, then it went back to normal, but this problem can't be good for the deck or sunroom if it happens every year, correct? Just wondered.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on buck2217's instructable La-z-boy Reclaimed2 years ago
    La-z-boy Reclaimed

    Great, that is a good start ;-)Just a quick note though...Recently I read a few articles written by professional exterminators and exterminating companies and they said that pesticide sprays or spray bombs won't work on bedbugs,since they are a whole different category of insect and are extremely difficult to eradicate. Only certain methods work (heat being number one). It's probably how they were able to spread to almost every country in the world in a short amount of time.The buggers must be related to spiders since nothing seems to kill them, haha!Again, genius idea!!! I definitely will be trying this at some point.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on buck2217's instructable La-z-boy Reclaimed2 years ago
    La-z-boy Reclaimed

    What a fantastic idea!Love the Australian name of the DW40 spray,haha!A word of caution though...Be careful and take precautions when picking up thrown out furniture,since you never know 'why' it was thrown out. Could have bedbugs or other infestation. Heat kills bedbugs easily, and other insects are killed with insecticides. Just a thought.

    View Instructable »
  • realife11 commented on hairyconiption's instructable Glow in the Dark Hair Gel2 years ago
    Glow in the Dark Hair Gel

    Thanks for your concern, I appreciate that ;-)I just googled 'are glow sticks safe?' and it states it's not dangerous, just mildly toxic (as in, it will cause a burning sensation of the skin on some people and would have the same feeling in the mouth and stomach if swallowed). I would only put it in the hair, so as long as it doesn't touch the skin in any way, I think it would be okay, but one must always use caution in anything you try (always good to be extra cautious). Here's what one website showed, thanks again: Are Glow Products Safe? Items that glow have delighted children and adults for years. The question surrounding the safety of the liquid inside glowing sticks, bracelets, and other glow novelties often arises among concerned parents. People aren't just worried about th...

    see more »

    Thanks for your concern, I appreciate that ;-)I just googled 'are glow sticks safe?' and it states it's not dangerous, just mildly toxic (as in, it will cause a burning sensation of the skin on some people and would have the same feeling in the mouth and stomach if swallowed). I would only put it in the hair, so as long as it doesn't touch the skin in any way, I think it would be okay, but one must always use caution in anything you try (always good to be extra cautious). Here's what one website showed, thanks again: Are Glow Products Safe? Items that glow have delighted children and adults for years. The question surrounding the safety of the liquid inside glowing sticks, bracelets, and other glow novelties often arises among concerned parents. People aren't just worried about their children either. The Animal Poison Control Center of the ASCPA receives masses of similar calls from concerned pet owners each year. With this overwhelming concern for public safety, it's a surprise that glow products are such big sellers. Glowing novelty products, such as bracelets and sticks, are safer than the common household cleaners you find in a typical home. Your young child is far more likely to be seriously hurt from choking on a small glow toy than by splashing herself with the liquid contained inside. What Creates the Glow? The liquid inside of some glow products is a chemical called dibutyl phthalate. Glow products that don't use dibutyl phthalate use a small glass ampoule that contains a mixture of hydrogen peroxide dissolved in phthalic ester. Surrounding the glass ampoule is another chemical called phenyl oxalate ester. Dibutyl phthalate, widely considered the more dangerous of the above components, is used to manufacture plastics, glues, nail polish, leather, printing inks, safety glass, dyes and is used as a solvent for perfume. Poison Control Comments None of these chemicals are deadly dangerous, according to The National Capital Poison Center The advice from poison control for ingestion of the so-called glowing toxic liquid chemical is much the same. Rinse your mouth out well, drink a little milk, and call poison control, which will again, stay in touch to make sure you're fine. Poison control encourages people to stay in touch often because different individuals can have various reactions to chemicals. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Comments The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is considered one of the best children's hospitals in the country, possibly the world. The hospital's poison control center reports that, "dibutyl phthalate is not a poison; it is an irritant. The best treatment for any exposure to dibutyl phthalate is water."

    View Instructable »
  • Bloody Band-Aid Cookies for Halloween

    I think the peanut butter cookies are a great idea, much better tasting than just graham crackers and more realistic than the keebler cookies. I'm going to try that with 2 variations: I'll round the corners to make it look more like a bandaid, and I'll split the cookie in half lengthwise so that it's flatter like a bandaid. I may use white chocolate or marshmallow for the white part too. Love your idea, looks good, great job! ;-)

    View Instructable »
  • 37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    Hahaha. My first thought when I read the first line,"tie a tennis ball in a sock", was to stuff the sock in your spouse's gaping mouth when they wake you with their loud snoring! Kidding. I would never do that, just fantasize.

    View Instructable »