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  • rocketride commented on DIY KING 00's instructable DIY Bladeless Fan From Scratch6 months ago
    DIY Bladeless Fan From Scratch

    Frankly, I'm dubious of Dyson's patent. It should have been rejected for reasons of 'prior art'. To wit, a nearly identical device for 'entraining' a high volume/low velocity air (or water) flow into a high velocity/low volume flow using an annular Coanda-effect duct was described and illustrated in an article on that effect in the June, 1966 issue of 'Scientific American'.I found it a little bit weird reading through this article without seeing any reference to the Coanda effect or its discoverer. Henri-Marie Coanda, a Romanian-French engineer built and briefly flew the world's first (arguably) jet-propelled aircraft near Paris in 1910 (yes, 1910). His plane caught fire on takeoff-- it was a typical sticks-and-fabric aircraft of the day, but with a tube spewing fire inside it. It...

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    Frankly, I'm dubious of Dyson's patent. It should have been rejected for reasons of 'prior art'. To wit, a nearly identical device for 'entraining' a high volume/low velocity air (or water) flow into a high velocity/low volume flow using an annular Coanda-effect duct was described and illustrated in an article on that effect in the June, 1966 issue of 'Scientific American'.I found it a little bit weird reading through this article without seeing any reference to the Coanda effect or its discoverer. Henri-Marie Coanda, a Romanian-French engineer built and briefly flew the world's first (arguably) jet-propelled aircraft near Paris in 1910 (yes, 1910). His plane caught fire on takeoff-- it was a typical sticks-and-fabric aircraft of the day, but with a tube spewing fire inside it. It turns out that the plane caught fire because the metal plates he'd placed between the exhaust nozzles and the planes's fuselage fabric entrained the exhaust flames onto the fabric. He eventually figured this out, did some experimentation, wrote a paper and the effect was named for him.

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  • rocketride commented on offseid's instructable Quick and Easy Dice Tower1 year ago
    Quick and Easy Dice Tower

    Indeed. My fiancee and I got to know each other in a D&D game.

    That should have read, "Indeed. As an aside, my fiancee and I got to know each other in a D&D game. The stories we could tell about diceroll-based dungeon lawyering.

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  • rocketride commented on ThomasVDD's instructable Hard Drive Speaker1 year ago
    Hard Drive Speaker

    No, the heads move along the platters, not up and down, so they don't make the platter move in a way that would efficiently move air, either.

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  • rocketride commented on rog8811's instructable Dog Anti Bark Screen...... 1 year ago
    Dog Anti Bark Screen......

    The screen stops barking (assuming it works for a particular dog) by removing the visual stimulus that causes it. (Your canid may vary.)

    Sometimes a negative incentive is not needed, removing the positive one will suffice.

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  • rocketride commented on seamster's instructable Spray Paint Secret Safe1 year ago
    Spray Paint Secret Safe

    You need to put desiccant packs in with the bills.

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  • Modern Shelving System With NO HARDWARE!!

    OTOH, I have on a number of occasions had to fabricate specialized tools from what had been hardware. And I have seen tools used as hardware, but I've never committed that abomination myself.

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  • rocketride commented on SpecificLove's instructable 8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool1 year ago
    8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool

    Glass varies greatly in its hardness and abrasion resistance. Another major issue with surface abrasions on glass it that even un-tempered glass has much of its strength in its surface layer. Break the surface layer and the glass is substantially weakened.

    For things too soft to polish with steel wool, or where rust from embedded flecks might be an issue; but plastic isn't 'definitive' enough, there is a kind of pot scourer which is made of coiled ribbons of copper. Bear in mind that I haven't specifically tried these on polycarbonate or methacrylate plastic, but they seem safe on all kinds of glass, except actual optics. Way too rough for camera lenses, binoculars, telescope optics, etc.

    So did I. He was a beautiful, brilliant, sweet, and slightly squirrelly tuxie named Edgar. He would get in the shower with me if I let him.

    Ouch!

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  • Thirty Unusual Uses for Aluminum Foil

    Of course, if George III and Parliament had been paying proper attention and simply recognized, by law, the colonials as having the same rights as any other British Subjects, those colonies would have had no reason to break away Circa 1775, being something other than British was not that appealing a prospect to a majority of the colonials. But, no, the mother country wanted a fight (for reasons I'm not even going to try to psychoanalyze), and she got one.

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  • Homemade Anvil (from Rusty Railroadtrack)

    It looks a lot taller in the flange (and wider) than any of the rails I see around here (northeast US).

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  • rocketride commented on gravityisweak's instructable DSLR Ring Light2 years ago
    DSLR Ring Light

    Do the manufacturers publish equivalent color temperature (Kelvin) values for these rings? My concern is that since these are white LED devices, they work by having a blue to near-UV LED die excite a layer of phosphors coating it Most of the light coming from the device is fluorescence from the phosphors. This means that it produces a non-continuum spectrum, like any fluorescent tube-- rather than anything like a black-body curve. This can make color balancing interesting, and can sometimes cause colors in the subject to look peculiar, even if you do have the color balance looking pretty normal. This can be an issue with flowers, because some floral pigments reflect or fluoresce on narrow bands and if the light is weak at a point in the spectrum where a pigment is especially reflec...

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    Do the manufacturers publish equivalent color temperature (Kelvin) values for these rings? My concern is that since these are white LED devices, they work by having a blue to near-UV LED die excite a layer of phosphors coating it Most of the light coming from the device is fluorescence from the phosphors. This means that it produces a non-continuum spectrum, like any fluorescent tube-- rather than anything like a black-body curve. This can make color balancing interesting, and can sometimes cause colors in the subject to look peculiar, even if you do have the color balance looking pretty normal. This can be an issue with flowers, because some floral pigments reflect or fluoresce on narrow bands and if the light is weak at a point in the spectrum where a pigment is especially reflective or emittive, or particularly weak or strong at the particular band at which a fluorescent pigment absorbs, it can cause particular colors to look darker or brighter than they would under, say, sunlight. (This can be useful or problematic, depending on the circumstances.)

    I'm thinking that the easiest way to mount it would be to just epoxy the ring light onto a spare Cokin filter (or similar) lens flange. This is basically a flat (meaning 'planar', not 'matte') anodized aluminum disc with a hole in the middle and filter threads around the hole. It screws onto the lens, a slot on the back of the filter holder slides onto it, and filter(s) slide into slots on the front side of the holder.

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  • rocketride commented on Marsh's instructable How to Make Retractable Casters!2 years ago
    How to Make Retractable Casters!

    Actually, 'castor' is also correct for the plant and the oil from its seeds. It's also the name of the zoological genus comprising beavers.

    The use of castor oil, generally not fully de-ricinated, had detrimental health effects on WW-1 pilots. They were generally breathing their engines' exhaust and the lucky ones got away with only having somewhat loose bowels

    That's similar to a standard method for transporting large 'Dobsonian' telescopes, except that the wheels are on the ends of wheelbarrow-style handles, which bolt to the sides of the telescope's 'rocker box'. As opposed to your permanent installation. Your saw-table's wheels aren't in the way if they just stay attached. The ones on the 'scopes would be in the way during operation if they were still attached.

    It's also a good lubricating oil for low temperature applications. It used to be the main lubricant used in internal combustion engines, but it has a tendency to form varnish from engine-level heat and so has long since been supplanted by petroleum-based oils.

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  • rocketride commented on msuzuki777's instructable Arduino Ublox GPS2 years ago
    Arduino Ublox GPS

    And, it turns out that you are right. I was looking at the NMEA specs way too late last night and just didn't notice that the GGA sentence, among others, does have an Altitude field. That's what I get for putting off the hobby stuff off until bedtime-- after the important stuff is done.

    Never mind. I found the TinyGPS++/Arduiniana site and its functions include one for pulling altitude data. (f anyone knows of any modules tha it specificaIly won't work with, please LMK. I just didn't want to buy a module and then discover that there was some weird and arcane barrier to getting the altitude info from it.

    The standard NMEA sentences don't seem to yield any altitude information. Is there a way to coax altitude info out of the chipset on this or any Ublox module? I don't need any of the waypoint or ETA- related stuff, just UT time and date, latitude, longitude, and altitude.

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