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4Instructables66,097Views56CommentsNorthern CaliforniaJoined October 15th, 2015
I have spent most of my life accumulating skills to be a more self reliant person. I like making stuff and doing multidisciplinary projects using available resources. I view the world as a resourcescape of open potential. I spend most of my time making stuff happen, making youtube videos and writing blog posts and stuff to help other people be more physically competent and understand the world around them better in a practical way. I'm not screwing around :)

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  • skillcult commented on potato wings's instructable Growing Apple Trees From Seed.7 months ago
    Growing Apple Trees From Seed.

    I did re-read it and he states repeatedly that the odds are enormously against getting anything good to eat. The relevant quotes are here: http://skillcult.com/blog/2015/11/9/bite-me It is very overstated and the entire chapter is wrapped around the mistaken idea that almost all apples from seed are not worth growing for anything but cider. That was the message. He mistakenly picked up that idea and ran with it. his point was that almost all the apples from seed sucked and were good for only cider and it was only by sheer numbers that new varieties happened. He may not have understood at the time either just how many apples sprung from that chaos of seeding planting. It wasn't just seedlings planted to grow as seedlings, but seedlings were used as rootstocks then and often ended...

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    I did re-read it and he states repeatedly that the odds are enormously against getting anything good to eat. The relevant quotes are here: http://skillcult.com/blog/2015/11/9/bite-me It is very overstated and the entire chapter is wrapped around the mistaken idea that almost all apples from seed are not worth growing for anything but cider. That was the message. He mistakenly picked up that idea and ran with it. his point was that almost all the apples from seed sucked and were good for only cider and it was only by sheer numbers that new varieties happened. He may not have understood at the time either just how many apples sprung from that chaos of seeding planting. It wasn't just seedlings planted to grow as seedlings, but seedlings were used as rootstocks then and often ended up overgrowing the top, or the top might die. Many good apples have also always come from hedgerows. I know people that hunt hedgerows for worthwhile apples The 1 in 1000's thing derives from the commercial breeding paradigm where the number of criteria an apple has to meet has become very high, so very few apples make the grade. As home growers we don't have so many criteria to meet.Regarding an experiment, we can do the same experiment in small numbers. I know people with various numbers of seedling trees. All we need is for them to report what percentage are worth growing and eating. All results from anyone growing a number of seedlings has been pretty encouraging. It's a gamble for sure, but it's not the dismal odds we are often told. Pollan is an intellectual and academic. He decided to write about something he didn't know anything about and ended up building a case on a fundamental error. That isn't that surprising given the prevalence of the misunderstood 1 in thousands thing, but it's unfortunate, because millions of people read that and they frequently cite him to make the case that it's a waste of time to grow apples from seed.

    Yay! :)

    Yay! :)

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  • Making Delicious Authentic Fermented Hot Sauce

    That is mold and stuff growing on top because the jar was not sealed well enough during fermentation or storage. If it is light, you can skim it off and use the peppers as long as they are smelling and tasting good. If there are peppers on top in the scum toss those out though. Seal the jars slightly more snug during fermentation and tighten them before storing. The jars won't break. Canning jars are designed to vent pressure.That type of scum is actually common and expected in ferments that are exposed to air, but it is skimmed off and precautions are always taken to keep the food below the liquid. With jars like this, we can seal them and prevent that from happening at all because the fermentation pushes all of the air out of the jar. By sealing the jars up with a blanket of ca...

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    That is mold and stuff growing on top because the jar was not sealed well enough during fermentation or storage. If it is light, you can skim it off and use the peppers as long as they are smelling and tasting good. If there are peppers on top in the scum toss those out though. Seal the jars slightly more snug during fermentation and tighten them before storing. The jars won't break. Canning jars are designed to vent pressure.That type of scum is actually common and expected in ferments that are exposed to air, but it is skimmed off and precautions are always taken to keep the food below the liquid. With jars like this, we can seal them and prevent that from happening at all because the fermentation pushes all of the air out of the jar. By sealing the jars up with a blanket of carbon dioxide, they are protected. IF you open them and let out he carbon dioxide and let air in, they will start to grow stuff on top and eventually spoil, even in the fridge.So, to summarize, start the ferment with a light twist on the jar lids. After the most active fermentation is over, but they are still working a little, snug the lids down. The carbon dioxide formed as it finishes fermenting will push out the air. Don't open it after that point until you're ready to use the peppers or you let more air in. Just yesterday I opened one of the jars that I made in this video. The peppers were above the brine, but they are fine and there is no scum, because there was no air. In the old days, people had to use open crocks, but we have better options.

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  • How to Unlock Your Car in 30 Seconds

    I thought it was fine. The cover picture is okay, it just represents the concept of unlocking a car with a string v.s. the actual method. Not a big deal to me. It did take more than 30 seconds though. It's a cool method. I'm definitely going to try it.

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