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tpsully

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I am an engineer, teacher and maker. Remember, help mentor a kid...we need a smarter world. Kids need our help. Later, we'll need them...

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I'm certain that you can. An 8051 should be able to do the job. You'll just have to adapt the manufacturers libraries or adapt Adafruit's libraries.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    The sensor is interfaced with I2C (standard two wire interface). The library to extract the data is available on the adafruit.com website via the Arduino IDE. Otherwise, you have to read the data sheet and write your own library for it (I think ST has some source code available). All of this is in the data sheet located here: https://www.st.com/resource/en/datasheet/vl53l1x.p...

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  • tpsully's instructable Visual Metronome for Drummers 's weekly stats:
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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I just downloaded the code I posted at the end of Step 12. I am using Arduino IDE version 1.8.7. I created a directory and re-compiled the code. It compiles with no errors. So this means your installation is missing something and it is impossible for me to tell what that is. I cannot remotely diagnose your problem with the installation. I usually tell a student or a coworker when they have a problem like this to try creating separate programs that use each of the features/sensors in the program. The example programs that are provided by each vendor (in this case, Sparkfun and Adafruit) should compile and run for you. If each of them can be compiled then my software should as well. Again, my code compiles so something has to be different between our installations. You will have to keep try…

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    I just downloaded the code I posted at the end of Step 12. I am using Arduino IDE version 1.8.7. I created a directory and re-compiled the code. It compiles with no errors. So this means your installation is missing something and it is impossible for me to tell what that is. I cannot remotely diagnose your problem with the installation. I usually tell a student or a coworker when they have a problem like this to try creating separate programs that use each of the features/sensors in the program. The example programs that are provided by each vendor (in this case, Sparkfun and Adafruit) should compile and run for you. If each of them can be compiled then my software should as well. Again, my code compiles so something has to be different between our installations. You will have to keep trying until you find out what that is.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I'm assuming that this line is at the top of the code:#include <Adafruit_DotStar.h>If it is then, have you included the library for it?Sketch -> Include Library -> Manage LibrariesSearch for DotStar and include the library from Adafruit.Also, make sure you have the library from Sparkfun for the Distance Sensor.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    There is only one file for the software and it is at the end of Step 12 (there is a download button)

    I have not written it yet. I added the beeper but haven't had time to write the software yet. When I mentioned the beeper I wrote: "I was going to add software". I'll post the software if and when I get it working.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    It's posted in the Instructable at the end of Step 12. It is the .ino file.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I don't understand what you are asking me...can you clarify?

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I've recently added a piezoelectric beeper. I was going to add software so it warns of a fast moving object. My plan is to look at the changes (the derivative of the signal). Instantaneous changes would be like when an object is first detected and require no beep. After that, rapid falling distance would mean an object coming closer and would require a proportional beep. How's that?

    I've recently added a piezoelectric beeper. I was going to add software so it warns of a fast moving object. My plan is to look at the changes (the derivative of the signal). Instantaneous changes would be like when an object is first detected and require no beep. After that, rapid falling distance would mean an object coming closer and would require a proportional beep. How's that?

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    I learned how to program the M0 by following the directions on Adafruit's Learning site. https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-trinket-m0-ci...I don't know how to help unless you can be more specific.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    Are you trying to program it using C/C++ or Python? Will it just not load?

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    Hi. I've had good luck indoors using the sensors on the glasses. But yes, outside they don't work really at all. In the shade, looking at some bushes they seemed to work. But when I turned my head to look away from those bushes, they just seemed to act like there is something at the closest distance limit. Years ago I made an IR communications system for my work (1995?). It worked great indoors and I could get up to 120 feet transmitting 9600 bps (if I remember the rate correctly...maybe it was 1200). When I tried to use them outside the sensor saturated so it could not detect the modulated IR pulses. By using a toilet paper tube (I swear...a moment of inspiration) on the receive sensor, I could get it to work outside up to 40 feet but only if the receiver wasn't facing the sun. You tried…

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    Hi. I've had good luck indoors using the sensors on the glasses. But yes, outside they don't work really at all. In the shade, looking at some bushes they seemed to work. But when I turned my head to look away from those bushes, they just seemed to act like there is something at the closest distance limit. Years ago I made an IR communications system for my work (1995?). It worked great indoors and I could get up to 120 feet transmitting 9600 bps (if I remember the rate correctly...maybe it was 1200). When I tried to use them outside the sensor saturated so it could not detect the modulated IR pulses. By using a toilet paper tube (I swear...a moment of inspiration) on the receive sensor, I could get it to work outside up to 40 feet but only if the receiver wasn't facing the sun. You tried something similar with no luck...I'm sure these time-of-flight sensors are fast...faster than my old IR system.I have seen another Instructable that used sonar for glasses for the blind. That was what I was going to initially try. I'm glad I didn't as someone has already gone to the trouble of building them (I hate re-inventing the wheel). But that may be the best approach for outdoors. But they won't be very directional. Using a very short wavelength RF signal (like 10 GHz) you might get better resolution but, I think wearing a microwave transmitter on the head would be bad in many ways. So, again, sound might be better for outdoors.Again, inside I'm having good luck with the sensor. I'm using Sparkfun's library and not trying to implement the manufacturers supplied code because both Sparkfun and Adafruit have wrap them up as libraries/objects.Are the eBay boards really using the same sensor? Sound like a dumb question but I wonder about knock-off parts these days (I have encountered a few). Just wondering.

    It's hard to believe I didn't put a diode on that motor. Thanks!

    Wow, that is funny about using a toilet paper tube. At this moment the glasses are set for 2 meters to 50 mm and again, inside they work fine. I am making software changes so that the vibration level is adjustable and the distance set point it set by cycling through button presses. I am adding a piezo beeper so maybe you could let out a chirp for a fast approaching object. I'm not sure how well it will work but I'm giving it a try.I agree about the sonar sensors being big and bulky as well as their inherent low resolution. That's why I looked for something else. I was thinking about making a larger pair that looked like Geordi's goggles on Star Trek TNG. I doubt that would be universally acceptable so something more discrete like what you are doing might be better.

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  • tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses's weekly stats:
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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    Thanks. I agree. I hope a future prototype has the glasses free to look through or is just something to add to regular glasses.

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses
  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    You are correct. But most people know what RADAR is and few know what LiDAR is. I wrote software to process LiDAR data to create 3D raised relief maps of the earth and I have given several talks about it to engineers and many of them didn't know what LiDAR was. Maybe as more applications of LiDAR make it out into the world it will enter common use. But, for now, I thought people would 'get' the title. I wondered if it was "Walking LiDAR' or 'LiDAR Glasses if people would have clicked right past it.But again, you are correct. And such a small time of flight sensor is just so cool. I still keep finding things to use it for. Thanks!

    The CPU speed and communications speeds are far far slower than say a cell phone. A lot of research has been done in this area. But I think a comparison against existing electronics is fair and this set of electronics generates far lower frequencies than many other devices we are exposed to.

    I'll think about adding something. Thanks again!

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  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses
  • tpsully commented on tpsully's instructable Radar Glasses

    Thanks. I had to wait until I got home from work to look at both links. Very cool. I may have to give this a go...after the projects that are ahead of it! :)

    Thank you!

    Thank you!

    I'm not sure. But it's a great idea!

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    • Peripheral Radar for the Visually Impaired
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  • Thanks! I think it is helping him. It will be easier when this smaller version is on his glasses.Sorry to hear about your trouble. I'll be posting another Instructable as soon as I can about another device to help with this. So keep a look out. It might be more of what you'd like. Email me if you want to see a picture of it. tpsully and that's using gmail.com. I'm happy to help if I can. Thanks again!

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  • Thanks! I’m glad you liked it.

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  • I’ll see what I can do!

    My plan is to design a board. But, we’ll see. Time is always the enemy. But I agree it could get even smaller. Right now we’ll see how it works and if we need to change anything. Thanks!

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  • Thanks. I'm glad you liked it!

    Thanks. We seem to get our one species of hummingbird in my area of New England. I wish I also got yours...I'd love to get photos of that little guy! I also think you could make one...maybe a local nerd in your area could help. But, I'll keep posting pictures of what we get this year. Thanks again!

    Well I started the project a year ago in winter when there were no birds. So I found a few you tube videos of hummingbirds and recorded those sound. That’s what I used to get the software going.

    Thanks. It did use video. As I said in the write-up, I used the iPhone to record video including slow motion. But, the camera uses a lot of power and even though the resolution is good, camera's just keep getting better and better resolution (and I get to use my wife's cameras). Plus, with the long lenses I can get great stills at a distance. But I guess the most important reason I did it this way is that I needed a challenge and thought this might be fun. Plus, I can use it to teach (my college class as well as local school kids). It's nice to be an engineer by day but, I have much more fun on things like this on my off-hours.

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