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uncle reamus

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  • RavenClawed Wand Stand – Luna Lovegood Style

    FUBAR-ed.Pretty cool. I may have to copy you. My daughter is also a huge Potter fan and named my granddaughter Luna. May be a nice little B-day present for her. She turns 7 this year. Tip on the files, put some chalk on them. The chalk will help keep bits of metal from clogging up the teeth when you use one.

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  • Turtle Shell Copper

    If you can get the heat and make welds you may be interested in Mokume Gane. Most people i know use coins like a stack of quarters. The different metals combined with different damascus designs make for really interesting paterns.

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  • DIY Blast Furnace on a Budget!

    Plaster of paris IS NOT a refractory. It is in fact a heat sink. It is actually robbing your heat. POP starts degrading at around 450* F, you need temps much high than that to melt metal. At best the POP will degrade quite quickly at worst it can spall, blowing out pieces of POP along with the charcoal inside. Please if you are going to melt metal do it safely and get the materials that are made for doing such. Just becuase someone on youtube does it, does not mean it is safe. Melting metals is no joke and should not be taken lightly. A slight slip up could lead to a long hospital visit or a trip to the morgue.

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  • How to Replace the Brakes on a Vehicle

    A couple pro tips:Clean all that rust and stuff off of the hub and smear some anti-seize on the face, especially around the studs. This will prevent the rotor form getting frozen to the hub and will usually just slide off next time you do your brakes. Also will reduce noise when braking.A small pry bar or large screw driver wedged between the caliper and old rotor will collapse the caliper. Stick it in and pull it towards you. (only works on calipers that do not need turned have the piston turned to collapse.)Even though they have silencer pads on the back of the brake pad, a little never seize on the back helps. Also under the abutment clips. Wire brush any rust off of the metal surfaces. 99% of the time that is where brake noise comes form after doing a brake job, dirty non lubricated …

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    A couple pro tips:Clean all that rust and stuff off of the hub and smear some anti-seize on the face, especially around the studs. This will prevent the rotor form getting frozen to the hub and will usually just slide off next time you do your brakes. Also will reduce noise when braking.A small pry bar or large screw driver wedged between the caliper and old rotor will collapse the caliper. Stick it in and pull it towards you. (only works on calipers that do not need turned have the piston turned to collapse.)Even though they have silencer pads on the back of the brake pad, a little never seize on the back helps. Also under the abutment clips. Wire brush any rust off of the metal surfaces. 99% of the time that is where brake noise comes form after doing a brake job, dirty non lubricated areas that is not just the clips. And now a question, Why didnt you change those shoes also? I have been an auto tech for well over 30 years. Please do not take this as criticism, just a couple tips to help. Over all, from some one who has had to fix what others "fixed", i say nice and thorough job.

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  • Simple and Easy Tinfoil Rockets

    We called them pocket rocket back in the 70's when i was a kid.

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  • Giant Weather Predicting Storm Globe!!!

    Real camphor is used as a flavoring, known as edible camphor. However the " Cinnamomum camphora" tree or bush is not the only source of camphor and many of the other sources are indeed toxic. (Bet ya cannot guess what else we get from the species "Cinnamomum")Camphor wood was used to make tool boxes. The camphor prevents rust on tools such as files that cannot be oiled.

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  • How to Make a Solar Powered Cat House Out of a 19 Gallon Tote

    Flip it upside down. The totes are usually much stronger than the lid and wont sag.

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  • Drop Point Pocket Knife

    Nice little knife. 1 thing though it is a whetstone not a wet stone. Whet is a middle English word for sharpen. A water stone and an oil stone along with diamond and ceramic stones are all whetstones. A whetstone does not necessarily need a liquid applied, it is just a stone or surface used for sharpening. I do have to commend you for the 2 cycle tempering though. Many people do not mention that when tempering.

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  • Making an Anvil Stand That Rolls Like a Dolly

    I am so glad i read this all. At first i was thinking is that electrical tape? Then no cant be must be rubber tie downs. May i offer a suggestion, get rid of the galvanized plate. Replace it with a rubber pad or silicone. That will deaden the ring a whole lot. One question, why is the face of the anvil painted?

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  • Custom Anvil Stand - No Welding Required

    Those long drill bits are called "bell hangers bits".

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  • First Blow. Getting Into Blacksmithing With Empty Pockets

    Welcome to the world of black smithing. It will become an obsession. You have made a few mistakes that i can see, but that is the learning curve. As someone else has pointed out your anvil needs more mass under it. Do a search on improvised anvils. Your forge is a bottom blast, good for coal but if you are to use charcoal or wood side blast is much better. The best thing i can suggest is do a search on "just a box of dirt" (JABOD, for short) You can build a forge with a piece of plywood and a couple 2x4's in under an hour. 3 things to keep in mind 1) hold the black end, hit the red end. 2) just becuase it is black does not mean it is cold. 3) a blacksmith will make a tool, so that he can make a tool. Anyway looks like you are on your way. Be safe but most of all have fun. Oh di…

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    Welcome to the world of black smithing. It will become an obsession. You have made a few mistakes that i can see, but that is the learning curve. As someone else has pointed out your anvil needs more mass under it. Do a search on improvised anvils. Your forge is a bottom blast, good for coal but if you are to use charcoal or wood side blast is much better. The best thing i can suggest is do a search on "just a box of dirt" (JABOD, for short) You can build a forge with a piece of plywood and a couple 2x4's in under an hour. 3 things to keep in mind 1) hold the black end, hit the red end. 2) just becuase it is black does not mean it is cold. 3) a blacksmith will make a tool, so that he can make a tool. Anyway looks like you are on your way. Be safe but most of all have fun. Oh did i mention be safe. Love the anvil stand.

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  • uncle reamus commented on WesH31's instructable Building an Outhouse

    Well our closest neighbor was, well a long ways away. so it wasnt the neighbors. And as far as those big feeted critters, well i call horse pucky on them, but that is a different conversation. I think they just did not want to go out alone. We did have mountain lion, wild cats, and bears in those woods. But i think it was mostly the skunks they was feared of. Oh and snakes.

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  • uncle reamus commented on WesH31's instructable Building an Outhouse

    I grew up in a holler in KY. We got indoor plumbing around 78. Us menfolk did not use it as much as the womenfolk, we were on a farm so we would just pee on the tree. I do however remember before bed we would all go out and pee off the porch. Then the women would go. They always had to have a chaperon that was usually my grandpa or uncle, but sometimes when i was little sometimes i would go out with them. The women would use the porch same as men. But i have memories of my mom, aunts, and grandma with their big white buts hovering off the edge of the porch.

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  • I just bought a house and i am planning on a deck after winter breaks. Thanks for the ideas.Hope i can carry a bucket of sand at 70.

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  • This is right on time. Me and the old lady will be closing tomorrow morning on our new house, well our 118 year old house. It has a 32x32 foot barn that i will park my truck in becuase the 10 x 20 garage, i have to fold the mirrors just to get inside of. So my plan is to turn the garage into a work shop. Here in Ohio it gets down into the teens, not horridly cold but cold enough.

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  • Your grid squares are wrong. Always keep East/west numbers together along with North/South. If you are on grid 4085, your next coordinate would be 402854, not 408524. The lines that run vertically are E/W lines, the horizontal are N/S lines. So reading up will give you the N/S line, not the E/W line. This is important, E/W is the first reading, N/S is second. So in actuality you are on grid 8540. What you call resection is also called triangulation. Each square is called a click, the reason that in the military "click" is slang for a kilometer. Easiest way to find your location though is to have an assistant shake a tree, then look for the shaking tree on your map. (joke we used on the newbies in the Army).

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  • When i do a twist like in step 4 i put one end in my vice then hold the other end with a cresent wrench and twist in one direction from the middle. Bottle openers are cool little projects that dont take a whole lot of time and gets you doing all the basics of smithing. Draw, twist, bend, etc., a good way to practice hammer technics and you are only limited by your imagination. Very cool.

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  • A little off subject, An old guy i used to work with went walking in the woods one late winter and found a hornets nest and decided it would look nice on his bookshelf. He took the nest home and placed it in his living room. few hours later the hornets woke from their hibernation and were not happy about being relocated.

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  • First rule of auto maintenance : Never ever rely on the jack to support the vehicle while working on it. 2nd rule see #1.Use either jack stands or blocks to set the vehicle on. Some brakes do not have the "squeakers" on them. If yours do not have them a good way to quickly check whether you need brakes is to check the level of the brake fluid. It does not evaporate. The fluid moves into the caliper, the less pad you have the more fluid will be needed to fill the caliper. Thereby lowering the fluid level in the reservoir. Use a liquid like Brake-Kleen to clean away brake dust. Apply ceramic brake lube to all metal to metal contact points, rubber seals, and sliders (pins). Before driving the vehicle short stroke the brake pedal a couple times. This will take up the gap left after…

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    First rule of auto maintenance : Never ever rely on the jack to support the vehicle while working on it. 2nd rule see #1.Use either jack stands or blocks to set the vehicle on. Some brakes do not have the "squeakers" on them. If yours do not have them a good way to quickly check whether you need brakes is to check the level of the brake fluid. It does not evaporate. The fluid moves into the caliper, the less pad you have the more fluid will be needed to fill the caliper. Thereby lowering the fluid level in the reservoir. Use a liquid like Brake-Kleen to clean away brake dust. Apply ceramic brake lube to all metal to metal contact points, rubber seals, and sliders (pins). Before driving the vehicle short stroke the brake pedal a couple times. This will take up the gap left after compressing the caliper. If you dont the car will not stop right away. Do not push it all the way down just about an inch several times. When you depress completely you can push the seal in the master cylinder past its wear point and tear the seal. This will result in spongy weak feeling brakes. Dont always happen but better safe than replacing the master. The rotors can be resurfaced but i have found that most passenger cars the rotors are cheap enough to just replace them most cost between $15 - $25. When putting the rotor on or the wheel back on apply a coat of never seize between the hub and rotor and the rim and rotor. Not the braking surface but the mounting surface. This will make them easier to remove next go round and will eliminate squeaks when braking. I am a certified auto tech. specializing in transmissions. 35 years experience.

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