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  • Make an Adjustable-Height Table With a Car Jack

    Thought this was a great idea - and modified it to make a raising cabinet for my table saw. That worked well - but now the scissor jack has failed. The thread on the jack has simply stripped after just a couple of months of light use. Question is no whether I simply abandon the idea or go out and buy another jack - and wait for it to fail again.

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  • Making Aluminum Bronze: Melting Copper and Aluminum

    1: In my foundry course, I was always taught to ment the higher melting point component first - and then add the lower mp one. Is there a reason for doing it the other way round? Was my foundry teacher wrong?2: I see in a comment above, makingboat tells about cooling quickly. What does the thermal shock effect have on the structure of this alloy? I cast bells (80%Cu, 20%Sn) and the slower you cool it the better. I leave the casing in the sand till it is cool enough to touch - dropping it into a pan of water brought tears to the eyes! 3: Were you actually surprised that you set your bench on fire?

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  • woodchipwilbur commented on ValentinJ2's instructable Making a Fake 4" Thick Table Top6 months ago
    Making a Fake 4" Thick Table Top

    Nice table. Did you think about using end-grain timber for the ends of the table? It just seems that, as the timber dries , it will shrink more across the grain than it does along the length. Introducing a cross-piece as you have not only spoiled the "solid-wood" effect slightly but you have also opened up the possibility of cracks appeaing in the top becuse those end pieces are glued solidly across the end grain. US conditions and materials vary from ours in the UK but if I were to make this in the air-dried English oak that I have, then cracks would soon be there.

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  • woodchipwilbur made the instructable 5 Ways to Print on Wood8 months ago
    5 Ways to Print on Wood

    Thanks for this. I needed a simple logo on some staging. Less, to advertise myself than to mark which way out to build it! Your description is all about which one looks best - a very significant choice will depend on how the finished article is to be used. I suspect that the polycrylic approach would be a small disaster if the rest of your board is to be finished in oil and beeswax. As I was finishing my staging (in birch plywood) with polycrylic floor varnish, this was clearly the way to go.I took note of the post from haleyma. Printing on the backing sheet from sticky labels worked wel. Got nice clear images. Trial and error showed that less is more. Reading "I brushed on the polycrylic with a small acid brush trying to get a thin film that was wet but no...

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    Thanks for this. I needed a simple logo on some staging. Less, to advertise myself than to mark which way out to build it! Your description is all about which one looks best - a very significant choice will depend on how the finished article is to be used. I suspect that the polycrylic approach would be a small disaster if the rest of your board is to be finished in oil and beeswax. As I was finishing my staging (in birch plywood) with polycrylic floor varnish, this was clearly the way to go.I took note of the post from haleyma. Printing on the backing sheet from sticky labels worked wel. Got nice clear images. Trial and error showed that less is more. Reading "I brushed on the polycrylic with a small acid brush trying to get a thin film that was wet but not puddling" made me add too much polycrylic. Excess squeezed out of the sides. That was a bit of a menace but more serious was the fact that the varnish crinkled the paper. A much thinner layer worked well.Care is needed with the first coat of polycrylic over the top - it's easy to scrub the toner off. It'll need a couple more coats - and we're good to go!First image: an overviewSecond: a good result! All the toner has transferred from the waxy paper to the wood.Third: the result of some crinkling of the paper

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  • woodchipwilbur commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable 5 Ways to Print on Wood8 months ago
    5 Ways to Print on Wood

    I hope that my reference to Michael the Angel was a response in the same mode!

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  • woodchipwilbur commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable 5 Ways to Print on Wood8 months ago
    5 Ways to Print on Wood

    If I could afford one of those beasts, I think I could afford to get Michelangelo to hand-paint my logos!! ($160,000 I saw) :-)

    That sounds like a great idea! I am just working on the "branding" of some staging and had planned to use the acetone route. I'm already finising them with a water-based acrylic and so, having read your comment I'll be trying that tomorrow! Already printed copies of the logo onto label backing. That's worked well. Now for the transfer...

    I'm pretty sure that the Polycrylic won't 'take' well to a surface with oil and beeswax already soaked in. I would guess that none of these methods which are, after all, just depositing a thin layer of laser toner onto your board, is going to be very durable on something that's going to get a good deal of wear and abrasion. Your main protection will be the covering that you put over.A cutting board (I'm assuming this is a kitchen chopping board) needs to be finished with something like your oil and beeswax which soaks in. An acrylic finish is more of a coating on top that will be destroyed with the first knife cut. My way to brand a chopping board is to use one of these!

    Have you tried that? I suspect that a cloth would dissipate both the pressure and the heat. What you are trying to do is to re-melt the toner and press it into the wood. The cloth, I suspect, will insulate the iron.

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  • woodchipwilbur commented on April Wilkerson's instructable Ultimate Mobile Clamp Rack9 months ago
    Ultimate Mobile Clamp Rack

    Some good ideas. But - like others - I'm amazed that you feel the need to buy (and store) so many clamps! I'm retired from a life as a professional cabinet maker and I still have all of my clamps. All eight of them are hanging on the wall. OK - I grew up in an era when speedclamps hadn't been invented and, OK - sometimes I could have done with more. But 42 clamps on one side at, I guess, $40 apiece? I'd have other plans for $1600 of spare cash!

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  • $100 10ft Workbench With Storage

    ... another quite separate thing strikes me which, perhaps, is the cause of some of my unease...You have a fine and sturdy bench. I don't know quite what work you do, but from the evidence of your machinery, it's quite a lot of woodworking. Yet this bench has no provision for holding wood. You can't clamp things down because of the drawers along the front. Even without them, there is no lip as the top is flush (I think) with the top rail. There's no woodworking vice (sorry - in US, it's a "vise", I think) or any provision for a holdfast. If you want to work on a piece of timber on your bench, how do you hold it down?I'm interested in this thread because I, too, am kitting out my shed. It's not huge (4m x 2.7m) and it has to service a number of different needs. I hope I...

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    ... another quite separate thing strikes me which, perhaps, is the cause of some of my unease...You have a fine and sturdy bench. I don't know quite what work you do, but from the evidence of your machinery, it's quite a lot of woodworking. Yet this bench has no provision for holding wood. You can't clamp things down because of the drawers along the front. Even without them, there is no lip as the top is flush (I think) with the top rail. There's no woodworking vice (sorry - in US, it's a "vise", I think) or any provision for a holdfast. If you want to work on a piece of timber on your bench, how do you hold it down?I'm interested in this thread because I, too, am kitting out my shed. It's not huge (4m x 2.7m) and it has to service a number of different needs. I hope I'm not just being over critical, but maybe I'll expose myself by writing an instructable too...

    I think I am also talking "purely function". A workbench takes (literally!) a lot of hammer and screws and glue loosen over time. As you design something like this, it should be inherently strong and not rely on fixings. So I would make some shims to pack the loose joints and I would fix at least some sheet material at the back to keep the bench rigidly square. It doesn't need to cover the whole ten feet. Again, I would probably want to fix that board between the vertical legs, rather than just screwing it onto the back. That's because, again, I'd like to see something that was rigid by design and not simply because of the amount of ironmongery I screwed in.Just like GM280, I would want to see your impressive array of power tools behind some cupboard doors. The thought ...

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    I think I am also talking "purely function". A workbench takes (literally!) a lot of hammer and screws and glue loosen over time. As you design something like this, it should be inherently strong and not rely on fixings. So I would make some shims to pack the loose joints and I would fix at least some sheet material at the back to keep the bench rigidly square. It doesn't need to cover the whole ten feet. Again, I would probably want to fix that board between the vertical legs, rather than just screwing it onto the back. That's because, again, I'd like to see something that was rigid by design and not simply because of the amount of ironmongery I screwed in.Just like GM280, I would want to see your impressive array of power tools behind some cupboard doors. The thought of stirring up all that dust with a leaf blower is an interesting one!

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  • $100 10ft Workbench With Storage

    Looking at your rebates for the rails, I see that they are quite a loose-looking fit. Is there a good reason for that? I would have thought that a snugger fit would hold the bench more rigid.

    I just saw the loose-looking joints and wondered. See the details of your images. Your bench is good and solid and heavy - which is great - but I don't see any back panel attached that will help to prevent the bench from leaning over and becoming a parallelogram. As the joints don't look to provide a particularly tight joint, then I would fear that, with a bit of use, the whole construction could easily achieve quite a significant wobble. In the good old days before sheet material was common (yes, I'm old enough to remember that!), then you'd use triangulation straps to maintain rigidity - but nowadays, a sheet of pretty well anything will help to hold the whole thing stiff.

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  • How to Make a 3D Printed Drill Jig for Dowel Joints

    That sounds good! A far better solution to mine! Might give that a whirl when I've finished casting my bells....

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