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  • Thank you very much for the nice words! As with anything, there are many improvements that can be done, though most would go unnoticed to the eye as they would deal with structure and how it is put together.Legalizing/certifying this bed right now (to make this official/even safer) and finding that there are a few minor tweaks that need to be done in order for it to pass - mainly with how matress platforms are attached.

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  • Very nice work! I believe the reason why a lot of modelers (me included) steer clear of paper is not because it cannot reproduce the same results plastic kits can, but because of the lifespan. Paper fades, and depending on how moist your environment is, will be exposed to and affected by it. Plastic will simply last you several lifetimes more for your future generations to enjoy.Speaking of quality of paper vs plastic, guys from Japan (check eBay for "Sankei") have been creating the highest detail kits of buildings I've ever seen in Z Scale. In fact, I've been noticing a shift towards paper models even in big manufacturers like Marklin, too.Truthfully none of the existing kits hit my benchmark for quality, so naturally I've started modifying kits and creating my own stuff. Take …

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    Very nice work! I believe the reason why a lot of modelers (me included) steer clear of paper is not because it cannot reproduce the same results plastic kits can, but because of the lifespan. Paper fades, and depending on how moist your environment is, will be exposed to and affected by it. Plastic will simply last you several lifetimes more for your future generations to enjoy.Speaking of quality of paper vs plastic, guys from Japan (check eBay for "Sankei") have been creating the highest detail kits of buildings I've ever seen in Z Scale. In fact, I've been noticing a shift towards paper models even in big manufacturers like Marklin, too.Truthfully none of the existing kits hit my benchmark for quality, so naturally I've started modifying kits and creating my own stuff. Take a look here: https://www.yuriysklyar.com/z-scale-diorama

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  • We sort by each particular piece. Build happens much quicker that way :)

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  • Thank you very much! :)

    No storage though! ;P

    Thank you!!! You're absolutely right about the documentation - by far the most time consuming part of the project. Plus, it's not as fun as actually designing/building, which is probably why most don't get around to doing it. :)

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  • - I wanted the project to be as little labor intensive as possible. You could cut out the clips which secure the bed together, but you'd need to create a way to get them out once they have been pressed into the bed. 3D printed design allows for that to happen by incorporating two small holes, just big enough to fit the ends of [needle-nose] pliers (so that the clip could be pulled out). You would have to most likely drill to create these holes. If you drill in such a small piece of plywood, there's a high chance that the whole thing will either fall apart, or start to lose some of the sandwiched boards, compromising on its strength.- Plastic is a bit more forgiving/flexible. Clips are designed to get wider towards the end, so they don't easily slide out.- Most will want to attach the ligh…

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    - I wanted the project to be as little labor intensive as possible. You could cut out the clips which secure the bed together, but you'd need to create a way to get them out once they have been pressed into the bed. 3D printed design allows for that to happen by incorporating two small holes, just big enough to fit the ends of [needle-nose] pliers (so that the clip could be pulled out). You would have to most likely drill to create these holes. If you drill in such a small piece of plywood, there's a high chance that the whole thing will either fall apart, or start to lose some of the sandwiched boards, compromising on its strength.- Plastic is a bit more forgiving/flexible. Clips are designed to get wider towards the end, so they don't easily slide out.- Most will want to attach the lights too, at that point you'll definitely have to 3D print the attachment clips, as there's currently no elegant way of attaching the lights without them.- ...And if you've already established a system that works, why not share it with other potentially similar in their purpose/use components?- Plus, 3D printing is AWESOME!!! ;)

    This is actually really clean - just had to google this particular one ;)I believe this approach might work really well for hardwood, not sure how it would perform with plywood.

    Funny you mention - that was the first thing I though about when I saw it. This was a one off cut, the file has the top step placed in the circle to save on material.

    Thank you!!! :DSimplicity of it definitely fits in with the rest of the IKEA furniture in the room, which is also quite simple.

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  • Thank you very much, Melissa!And that is an an excellent question indeed! Several reasons:- I wanted the project to be as little labor intensive as possible. You could cut out the clips which secure the bed together, but you'd need to create a way to get them out once they have been pressed into the bed. 3D printed design allows for that to happen by incorporating two small holes, just big enough to fit the ends of [needle-nose] pliers (so that the clip could be pulled out). You would have to most likely drill to create these holes. If you drill in such a small piece of plywood, there's a high chance that the whole thing will either fall apart, or start to lose some of the sandwiched boards, compromising on its strength.- Plastic is a bit more forgiving/flexible. Clips are designed to get…

    see more »

    Thank you very much, Melissa!And that is an an excellent question indeed! Several reasons:- I wanted the project to be as little labor intensive as possible. You could cut out the clips which secure the bed together, but you'd need to create a way to get them out once they have been pressed into the bed. 3D printed design allows for that to happen by incorporating two small holes, just big enough to fit the ends of [needle-nose] pliers (so that the clip could be pulled out). You would have to most likely drill to create these holes. If you drill in such a small piece of plywood, there's a high chance that the whole thing will either fall apart, or start to lose some of the sandwiched boards, compromising on its strength.- Plastic is a bit more forgiving/flexible. Clips are designed to get wider towards the end, so they don't easily slide out.- Most will want to attach the lights too, at that point you'll definitely have to 3D print the attachment clips, as there's currently no elegant way of attaching the lights without them.- ...And if you've already established a system that works, why not share it with other potentially similar in their purpose/use components?- Plus, 3D printing is AWESOME!!! ;)It would be an interesting area to explore though! Ability to utilize just the sheets of plywood - perhaps I'll give it some more thought for future releases. :D

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