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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0041: CircuitPython4 months ago
    HackerBox 0041: CircuitPython

    I had the same problem, and found that if I jiggled the pots from side to side, I could get reasonable volume and response out of it. Given the nature of of the circuit, it's going to be more sensitive to poor solder joints than most.I haven't revisited it yet, but I'm guessing that I didn't solder those pots on well. I'll reflow those joints to be sure. If that doesn't resolve the issue once and for all, I'll try replacing the pots with others, in case they're bad.

    Really interesting. I'm having this same problem. Hopefully the same solution will work for me!

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0028: JamBox 12 months ago
    HackerBox 0028: JamBox

    I made a 3D printable case for the Jambox. You can find it here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3070124

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0026: BioSense1 year ago
    HackerBox 0026: BioSense

    I made a 3D printable case for the Biosense board. You can find it here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3058384

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0032: Locksport1 year ago
    HackerBox 0032: Locksport

    Nice! It sounds like you have "the touch" :)

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0032: Locksport1 year ago
    HackerBox 0032: Locksport

    Being able to see into the lock makes it much easier to pick. Have you tried it with your eyes closed?

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0032: Locksport1 year ago
    HackerBox 0032: Locksport

    This month's box arrived in the nick of time! I got a comprehensive set of lockpicks several months ago and have been learning how to use them. My set was not easily portable, so I'd been about ready to buy a travel set when this box arrived. They're pretty nice picks, too.

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0031: the Ether1 year ago
    HackerBox 0031: the Ether

    The router can do what you want, with the caveat that the total bandwidth the radio is capable of will be divided between the two subnets. This is a decent guide for how to set it up: https://medium.com/openwrt-iot/openwrt-multiple-s...Although that covers configuring things through the command line, you can also set it up through the web interface.

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0031: the Ether1 year ago
    HackerBox 0031: the Ether

    I've made a 3D printable case for the EtherTap board. You can find it here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2976553

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0029: Field Kit1 year ago
    HackerBox 0029: Field Kit

    I like this! I suspect my kit will evolve over time, as well as what situations I use it in. Right now, I see myself using it primarily as an traveling repair kit, on long camping trips, and it would be useful during impromptu electronics projects when visiting friends (hey, it happens).I'll be adding a small voltmeter, the component identifier from HackerBox 0018, and a tiny multimeter to hold me until I build a logic analyzer/multimeter combo using the parts in this box. I'm thinking a bluetooth module to let me interface to it with my phone would be useful. I keep a "to go" bag that includes a solar panel, power bank, and the radio from HackerBox 0003. This would be a perfect addition to it.

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  • zal42 commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBoxes 0018: Circuit Circus1 year ago
    HackerBoxes 0018: Circuit Circus

    When I assembled this kit initially, I had very similar symptoms. For me, a visual inspection revealed that one of the pins going to the IC socket was not well-soldered. Soldering it fixed everything.

    I should also mention the resistors -- it can be infuriatingly hard to accurately distinguish between certain stripe colors on them, so it can be easy to put the wrong values in. Double-check them. If in doubt, measure them with a multimeter (you might want to desolder one lead when you do this, to avoid measurement errors that can occur when testing values in-circuit).This is probably not the issue you're having, but I thought I'd mention is for the sake of completeness.

    I'll chime in here -- my first recommendation is to get a magnifying glass or jeweler's loupe and a good bright light, and examine every solder joint carefully. You're looking for solder bridges connecting thing that shouldn't be connected (these can be really tiny, sometimes), and for bad or missing solder joints. Google for images of good and bad solder joints to get an idea of what you're looking for. Basically, if the joint looks like is has a line or crack, looks like there isn't enough solder, or if it looks balled up, then reflow the solder or add a touch more.In my personal experience putting together these sorts of kits, 80% of the time it turns out that I forgot to solder something, 19% of the time I made a bad joint/bridge somewhere, and 1% of the time it's something else.Al...

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    I'll chime in here -- my first recommendation is to get a magnifying glass or jeweler's loupe and a good bright light, and examine every solder joint carefully. You're looking for solder bridges connecting thing that shouldn't be connected (these can be really tiny, sometimes), and for bad or missing solder joints. Google for images of good and bad solder joints to get an idea of what you're looking for. Basically, if the joint looks like is has a line or crack, looks like there isn't enough solder, or if it looks balled up, then reflow the solder or add a touch more.In my personal experience putting together these sorts of kits, 80% of the time it turns out that I forgot to solder something, 19% of the time I made a bad joint/bridge somewhere, and 1% of the time it's something else.Also, while you're at it, be sure that the polarized components are placed in the right orientation.If a visual inspection doesn't turn anything up, then break out a continuity tester and begin making sure that there are solid connections where there should be. Follow the traces between the various parts and be sure there is actually continuity between them. Where possible, measure the continuity from the parts side of the board rather than probing the soldered connection itself (you're trying to find bad solder joints that aren't visibly apparent).

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  • HackerBoxes 0006: Internet of Things (IoT) Projects Featuring the Particle Photon

    I have found that the Dupont connectors are pretty flaky with breadboards, making intermittent connections. I try to avoid using them as a result, but when I do and the circuit doesn't work right, I've found that just jiggling them or removing/reinserting them often makes everything work correctly.Perhaps that was your issue?

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  • HackerBoxes 0006: Internet of Things (IoT) Projects Featuring the Particle Photon

    Very nice! Thanks for another wonderful box.I wanted to point out some additional information about Particle board development that is useful to those of us who aren't interested in using someone else's servers for development. SparkFun has a great guide for doing this: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/photon-develo...It's more convenient if you're running Linux, but with a minor amount of extra hassle, this can be made to work with Windows as well.

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  • zal42 followed HackerBoxes3 years ago