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  • zanod commented on DJJules's instructable True Condenser OPA Mics
    True Condenser OPA Mics

    I don't disagree with you, pgv100, and as long as you already know the abbreviation, the entire article would make immediate sense - but having spent a lifetime in the industry, I didn't know it, and because it was used many times over throughout the article, I lost a lot of meaning from it, although I did get the general gist. As I pointed out above, I looked it up in a list of about 100 abbreviations, and didn't find it. I, also, have written many technical articles, and I have always made a point of explaining abbreviations the first time they are used. If an abbreviation is to be used only once in an article, it is best left out and the expanded form used instead. For example, if I was going to write an article about abbreviations, that would use the term many times, then I might …

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    I don't disagree with you, pgv100, and as long as you already know the abbreviation, the entire article would make immediate sense - but having spent a lifetime in the industry, I didn't know it, and because it was used many times over throughout the article, I lost a lot of meaning from it, although I did get the general gist. As I pointed out above, I looked it up in a list of about 100 abbreviations, and didn't find it. I, also, have written many technical articles, and I have always made a point of explaining abbreviations the first time they are used. If an abbreviation is to be used only once in an article, it is best left out and the expanded form used instead. For example, if I was going to write an article about abbreviations, that would use the term many times, then I might write "The much used TLA (Three Letter Abbreviation) is a very handy means of reducing the verbage of a technical article. TLAs are ....."

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  • [2021] Servo Winch Challenge! Two (x2) Micro:bits & RC Car for Conquering Gravity

    Dexter, I just noticed your query while browsing. Do a YouTube search for using DC motors as servos. There are lots of examples, many of them using windscreen wiper motors. Your application shouldn't need anything as heavy as that, but the articles may give you some ideas.Another way would be to use a servo (a normal, model-type servo) with a couple of pins on the servo arm. The pins would click two switches that are attached to the heavier motor, so that when one of them is pressed, the heavy motor turns clockwise, and if the other is pressed, the heavy motor turns anti-clockwise. So the heavy motor is forced to mimic the movements of the lighter servo, although they are not connected electrically. The heavy motor would probably need a shaft coming out of each side, so the switchin…

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    Dexter, I just noticed your query while browsing. Do a YouTube search for using DC motors as servos. There are lots of examples, many of them using windscreen wiper motors. Your application shouldn't need anything as heavy as that, but the articles may give you some ideas.Another way would be to use a servo (a normal, model-type servo) with a couple of pins on the servo arm. The pins would click two switches that are attached to the heavier motor, so that when one of them is pressed, the heavy motor turns clockwise, and if the other is pressed, the heavy motor turns anti-clockwise. So the heavy motor is forced to mimic the movements of the lighter servo, although they are not connected electrically. The heavy motor would probably need a shaft coming out of each side, so the switching arrangement could be on one end of its shaft, and whatever you want to drive with it would be driven from the other end of its shaft.Just a thought.

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  • The Paint Can "Blumlein Pair" Stereo Microphone

    For a school orchestra, I'd say this is a GOOD one.

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  • zanod commented on DJJules's instructable True Condenser OPA Mics
    True Condenser OPA Mics

    You used the term OPA 16 times, but you never said what it means. I looked up a list of about 100 acronyms at https://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/OPAbut none seemed to fit. I know what OTA means (Operational Transconductance Amp), and I thought that OPA might be a parametric amp, but I only know of them being used in microwave stuff - waveguides, etc. So without knowing that, I was unable to understand a lot of your article.

    Thanks for the reply, DJJules. The amplifier you used is called the OPA1642, but I think that's just its part name, like in "HD74LS08P", the chip circuit is a 7408, the L is Low power, the S shows Shottky clamping diodes on its inputs, and P means it has a plastic packaging, but I don't know if HD means something or not. I suspect it's just part of a part number, and if OPA means something on OPA1642, then I'm equally bamfoozled by it. But I'm easily bamfoozled!However, though the term lost some meaning for me, it was still a good Instructible, and you have clearly spent some time researching the subject, so what can I say? Well done! The world needs more people like you.

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  • Ruler to Caliper (0.1mm Resolution!) - 3D Printed (Left Handed Version Included!)

    You made a nice job of this - and there's always great satisfaction in making things that work - but honestly, I was surprised that you bothered. I bought my first digital caliper about 12 years ago, and I have accumulated another couple since then, and I have never had any trouble with any of them, despite having spent much less than $20 on each one. The original one is in my workshop with a cracked glass - but all of them work. The reason I was attracted to this article was that only yesterday, I watched a YouTube video of an examination of an all-plastic, Chinese caliper for £4.99 (< $6) - and he couldn't find much wrong with it, despite stripping it down and reassembling it.Have a look :

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  • Binocular Frame for Backyard Astronomy

    Not all binoculars have an easily accessible centre-tube like mine do, but there are other ways of mounting a tripod support. Do a Google search of "Tripod support binoculars", then on the results screen, at the top of the screen, just under the search box, click "Images", and you will see lots of designs. You will find a version of the hardwood design above, but in plastic. If you make it out of hardwood, start by setting your binoculars for the distance between your eyes, then carefully measure the distance between the lens barrels. If your support is too wide, you won't be able to close the binoculars to match your eye distance.Make the same search on YouTube. You will find lots of ideas.

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  • Binocular Frame for Backyard Astronomy

    I use a tripod with my binoculars. It means they need an adjustment every couple of minutes because of the earth's rotation, but I can put my eyes very close to the eyepieces without actually touching them, so there is no shake, and it affords as good a view of the heavens as I can get with binoculars. Tripods are inexpensive.My tripod mount was bought about 50 years ago in Johannesburg, so don't go looking for one. I have just looked, and although mounts can be bought, they are pretty pricey. I didn't see one similar to mine, but look at the picture attached. My mount is shown on the top. It is an aluminium extruded vise that grabs the centre-tube of the binoculars. It's not available any more, but the bottom idea would be easy to make from hardwood, and would do just as good a jo…

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    I use a tripod with my binoculars. It means they need an adjustment every couple of minutes because of the earth's rotation, but I can put my eyes very close to the eyepieces without actually touching them, so there is no shake, and it affords as good a view of the heavens as I can get with binoculars. Tripods are inexpensive.My tripod mount was bought about 50 years ago in Johannesburg, so don't go looking for one. I have just looked, and although mounts can be bought, they are pretty pricey. I didn't see one similar to mine, but look at the picture attached. My mount is shown on the top. It is an aluminium extruded vise that grabs the centre-tube of the binoculars. It's not available any more, but the bottom idea would be easy to make from hardwood, and would do just as good a job.

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  • Slide Rule for the Modern Day

    In their heyday, you could get a slide rule for every function you could dream up, from electronics to aircraft design to plumbing. I have had a number, with bamboo slides, and I had a circular one too - but the most novel one I had was cylindrical, with a 2-metre scale wrapped around a cylinder of, from memory, about 1.5" diameter. There's one on YouTube, though it's a bigger diameter than the one I had.Next, you can have a go at an Astrolabe. ;-)

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  • zanod commented on TangoT1's instructable DIY Micro Rc Dlg Glider
    DIY Micro Rc Dlg Glider

    Maybe you could make it a little lighter by doing away with the control rods.See : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efJjC-xlu-Q

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  • zanod commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Clock
    Tuning Fork Clock

    Hi Wilko, if you're interested, there is a series of videos on the dismantlement of that skeleton clock, starting hereI was amazed to see how modular it all is. By the end of part 3, the basic mechanism is reduced to bare bones.I have my Tektronix 2465 in bits at the moment. It has been giving a start-up diagnostic failure for some time. At first, if I hit the "Go away" button, it would go away and the scope would work OK - but now, it has fairly frequent issues with the triggering, If I power it off and on again, I can usually get the triggering working - then channel-A gave up altogether and I had to take the attenuator out - the bit with the BNC connector on it. It turned out to be much more involved than I thought at first, and without any instructions, it took me a who…

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    Hi Wilko, if you're interested, there is a series of videos on the dismantlement of that skeleton clock, starting hereI was amazed to see how modular it all is. By the end of part 3, the basic mechanism is reduced to bare bones.I have my Tektronix 2465 in bits at the moment. It has been giving a start-up diagnostic failure for some time. At first, if I hit the "Go away" button, it would go away and the scope would work OK - but now, it has fairly frequent issues with the triggering, If I power it off and on again, I can usually get the triggering working - then channel-A gave up altogether and I had to take the attenuator out - the bit with the BNC connector on it. It turned out to be much more involved than I thought at first, and without any instructions, it took me a whole day to figure out how to get at it. There's a bit of close-quartrs soldering to do down awkward little holes, too. There are a few electrolytics on the triggering board that I'm going to replace, so I hope that will fix it. I replaced all the PSU electrolytics about 18 months ago because one of them blew up - but the scope dates fom1984, I think, and electrolytics have a life span.I've been picking out some of your low-level "LL_xxxx" drivers and searching for them in the reference manual for my chip (STM32H743), but they're not all there. In fact, quite a lot aren't. I've also been looking for any kind of instruction on it - free is best, but I can't even find a paid course.If you feel that you have more than enough to fill your time without getting involved with other people, I would understand and respect that viewpoint, but if you have a bit of time to put me on the right road, I'd appreciate if you'd write to me directly at mijewen@googlemail.comAre you into any new project?All of the Best

    Hi Wilko, if you're interested, there are three videos on the total dismantling of that skeleton clock, starting here ...I was amazed how modular it all is. Whole sub-mechanisms come out of it very easily.My Tektronix 2465 is in pieces at the moment. It had a diagnostic failure on switch-on, but would generally work OK if I simply cleared the error. Then the triggering started to get iffy - though if I switched it off and on again, I could usually get that working as well - then the channel A dies, and after a whole day of trying to find out how to do it, I eventually got the attenuator out. That's the module with the channel input BNC connector on it. I can see the fault, and it's fixable, but there's some pretty inconvenient soldering to do down little holes. I hope to get it work…

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    Hi Wilko, if you're interested, there are three videos on the total dismantling of that skeleton clock, starting here ...I was amazed how modular it all is. Whole sub-mechanisms come out of it very easily.My Tektronix 2465 is in pieces at the moment. It had a diagnostic failure on switch-on, but would generally work OK if I simply cleared the error. Then the triggering started to get iffy - though if I switched it off and on again, I could usually get that working as well - then the channel A dies, and after a whole day of trying to find out how to do it, I eventually got the attenuator out. That's the module with the channel input BNC connector on it. I can see the fault, and it's fixable, but there's some pretty inconvenient soldering to do down little holes. I hope to get it working again tomorrow.

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  • zanod commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Clock
    Tuning Fork Clock

    Wilko, you said you have a lathe. Perhaps you could knock together one of these over a weekend?I look forward to reading the Instructable ;-)

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  • zanod commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Clock
    Tuning Fork Clock

    Wilko, Don't look at the whole video above - it's embarrassingly too long. I wanted to edit the entry as well, but apparently the forum doesn't allow for editing after it is committed. Zoom the vid to about 11:00.

    It's lovely. I don't think it's immensely difficult to do something like this, but my word, it takes a lot of time and patience - and if you don't have the jigs (like his filing machine) then you have to make those first. You can't do it without machines.I used to enjoy my wood workshop, but I have neighbours now who object to the noise, so I have stopped. My best effort was

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  • zanod commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Clock
    Tuning Fork Clock

    It's beautiful, Wilko. How are your mechanical skills? Have you thought of making a ratchet wheel, so you could drive an analog clock movement, like the Bulova Accutron used? With a 440Hz fork, you would need 440 ratchet teeth per second, and a primary wheel with that many teeth is a non-starter. You would have to have fewer teeth on the primary wheel, and allow it to turn much faster than once per second, then gear it down.One of the endearing things about the Bulova was that the second hand swept the face at constant speed, rather than advancing one second at a time.

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  • zanod commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    My admiration is matched only by my envy. I have been trying to learn STM32, without much success after a lot of study. I'll be poring over your code to see what I can learn.Thanks for sharing it all.

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  • Pizza Cutter From Discarded Saw Blade

    Make a pizza cutter.Step 1 : Order a broadband fiber connection ...Nice job - you must feel very satisfied.

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  • zanod commented on MikeTheMaker's instructable Floating Table Top
    Floating Table Top

    I saw this about a week ago, and made it last night from memory.It took my 5-year-old grandson about 5 seconds to work out how it works.

    So did I. I saw it about a week ago, and made it last night just from remembering what it looked like. It was really simple - but I'd give marks for the idea - quite a novelty. There's a photo of mine in the comments.

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  • Programming the ATTINY85 Chip

    There is a playlist of a 7-video course on programming the ATtiny85 in assembly language at ...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HDLc40Gmac&list=PLuCmHWky5GN4iyRNNchJ4GMcVCSOgdOvc

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  • zanod commented on MahmoudB24's instructable Racing Drone FPV
    Racing Drone FPV

    What is the total cost? I know the goggles are pretty expensive.

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  • Get Started With Python

    Step 7: Your FinishedWoah, you just learnt the basics of python!Step 7: You're FinishedWoah, you just learnt the basics of spelling!

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  • I have put four files on https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AwNbtnRtm9...main.asm is the program file that I wrote.SoftStart.hex is the hex file that is sent to the ATtiny85SoftStart.sch is an Eagle schematicVeroboard.ppt is a power-point file that shows the cuts on the strip-board.I will remove these files in a couple of weeks, so please download them.

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  • Did you notice at 5:01 in the video, the HUGE current when the resistance was reduced to zero? ;-)

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  • If a guy had been demonstrating the soft-start, I'll bet you anything he would not have had a low-cut T-shirt displaying half his chest. It seemed to me this woman was more interested in showing herself than the device in question. If she doesn't want comments, she shouldn't invite them in that way.

    I made a similar soft-start for a table saw. I bought a low-cost saw, and it had gear teeth cut into the end of the motor shaft, which meshed with a gear wheel on the saw arbor, and after a year of hobbyist use, it had stripped all the teeth off the gearwheel due to accelerating the saw blade up to speed almost instantly - like the kick of a mule! I couldn't get parts, so I bought another cheap table saw (from Aldi), but designed a small circuit - much simpler than yours - and wrote code on an ATtiny85 8-pin microprocessor, which drives a triac to power the saw. It is simply designed to bring the blade to speed in about 2 seconds when the saw is switched on, so the soft-start box is located between the power switch on the saw and the motor. It has been built into the saw for a couple …

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    I made a similar soft-start for a table saw. I bought a low-cost saw, and it had gear teeth cut into the end of the motor shaft, which meshed with a gear wheel on the saw arbor, and after a year of hobbyist use, it had stripped all the teeth off the gearwheel due to accelerating the saw blade up to speed almost instantly - like the kick of a mule! I couldn't get parts, so I bought another cheap table saw (from Aldi), but designed a small circuit - much simpler than yours - and wrote code on an ATtiny85 8-pin microprocessor, which drives a triac to power the saw. It is simply designed to bring the blade to speed in about 2 seconds when the saw is switched on, so the soft-start box is located between the power switch on the saw and the motor. It has been built into the saw for a couple of fault-free years.If anybody wants the circuit and code, let me know. It was built on strip-board. Components cost was around £12.

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  • What were you actually trying to achieve? - reduced reflections in the room (reduced reverb), or reduced transmission of noise through the wall (improved neighbour relations)? In either case, what tests did you do to check the effectiveness of these dampers? They seem to cover a relatively small percentage of the wall area, so even if they were 100% effective, I would expect them to reduce reflections/transmission by only that percentage. However, 100% effectiveness is usually pretty hard to achieve, so I don't suppose they would be as effective as that.Can you share your test setup and the results?

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  • I heard a BBC podcast today (More or Less - http://open.live.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/5/redir/version/2.0/mediaset/audio-nondrm-download/proto/http/vpid/p070d39y.mp3 - fast forward to 19:30) in which they claimed that wood burning stoves are a greater source of PM-2.5 (particulate matter <2.5 microns) across London than diesel engines are. They estimate the percentage of PM 2.5 pollution in London, emanating from road traffic to be 12%. The amount from wood burner stoves (even though they're not in every house by any means) is 38%. PM-2.5 pollution is associated, they say, with the premature deaths of 29,500 people per year in the UK.

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  • zanod commented on KRP-01's instructable Micro RC Car

    A lovely little model, but an unusually poorly described instructable. For example, I just went looking for the micro Rx, but after 20 minutes on the web, I didn't find one. The one and only source I found said "Sold out". Your description of the steering mechanism is also wanting.

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  • Nice project - and very pretty. Here's an idea that you may like.I have had an ambition for a long time to make a wooden clock (with wooden gears) with two chimes, and the chimes would be easy to port to your project - if you're interested, of course. Each quarter hour, the clock would completely specify what time it is. With the traditional Westminster chimes, you may know that it's quarter past something, but the chime itself doesn't tell you what. My two chimes would be a ding and a dong, and would represent binary 1 and 0. and there would be six chimes on the quarter hour. The chimes would be...chime .. chime .. chime .. chime .. [space] .. chime .. chime (4 chimes for the hour and two chimes for the quarter-hour.Each chime would be a ding or a dong (a 1 or a 0)The hour chime…

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    Nice project - and very pretty. Here's an idea that you may like.I have had an ambition for a long time to make a wooden clock (with wooden gears) with two chimes, and the chimes would be easy to port to your project - if you're interested, of course. Each quarter hour, the clock would completely specify what time it is. With the traditional Westminster chimes, you may know that it's quarter past something, but the chime itself doesn't tell you what. My two chimes would be a ding and a dong, and would represent binary 1 and 0. and there would be six chimes on the quarter hour. The chimes would be...chime .. chime .. chime .. chime .. [space] .. chime .. chime (4 chimes for the hour and two chimes for the quarter-hour.Each chime would be a ding or a dong (a 1 or a 0)The hour chime would go from 0 0 0 1 for 1:xx (where xx is the quarter) to 1 1 0 0 for 12:xxThe quarter chime would be 0 0 on the hour, 0 1 for quarter past, 1 0 for half past, and 1 1 for quarter to.Every hour chime has at least one ding and at least one dong, so the difference can be discerned. This means that even if the quatrer-hour chime is 0 0 , you already have a 0 and a 1 in mind from the hour chime, so the quarter hour is easy to distinguish also.So if the clock goes...ding .. dong .. ding .. dong ....... ding .. dong... then it's half past ten.If it goes...dong .. ding .. dong .. ding ....... dong .. ding... then it's 5:15

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  • If you wanted to make something more serious of this, it shouldn't be too hard to incorporate some sort of encryption, such as used in remote opening of car doors. You could use a microcontroller, or it might be possible with the radio control. I fly RC planes, and the Tx/Rx uses all sorts of encryption and channel hopping so as not to interfere with another person's plane - and there can be lots of them in the air at once. I also have a cheap Motorola walkie-talkie that has 128 channels using encryption so that what you say can't be understood by somebody on another channel. That person can hear that you're talking, and he can't use his channel at the same time - but he can't understand what you're saying.I once worked on a hotel door locking system, and the mechanism was better than…

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    If you wanted to make something more serious of this, it shouldn't be too hard to incorporate some sort of encryption, such as used in remote opening of car doors. You could use a microcontroller, or it might be possible with the radio control. I fly RC planes, and the Tx/Rx uses all sorts of encryption and channel hopping so as not to interfere with another person's plane - and there can be lots of them in the air at once. I also have a cheap Motorola walkie-talkie that has 128 channels using encryption so that what you say can't be understood by somebody on another channel. That person can hear that you're talking, and he can't use his channel at the same time - but he can't understand what you're saying.I once worked on a hotel door locking system, and the mechanism was better than simply driving a bolt. If a door sags a small amount on its hinges, the bolt doesn't align any more, and it takes more force that you'd get from a servo. In the hotel mechanism, the servo moved an interposer in the lock, and the lock was opened by manual force. If the interposer wasn't in place, then turning the handle didn't do anything. If it was in place, then turning the handle pushed the interposer, which pushed the latch.

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  • zanod commented on Ryan110's instructable Cycle Tyre Belt

    When you're wearing it, do you find that ladies are queuing up for a date?

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  • Wow! 10 marks out of 10 for the article. Fantastic.There's a lot to be said for DIY - the satisfaction of producing something from your own efforts, and the chutzpah of taking it to the flying club and flying what everybody knows is 'yours'. And then, there's all the experience you get, and the things you learn along the way - which is probably priceless.However, talking of price, I find that it is only worth making something if it is unique, and cannot be found on the market. If a product is available, it is usually cheaper to simply buy it. Compared with commercially available drones with a similar spec to yours, how did you find the cost of making it?

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  • AzureOzma - I hope you didn't think my comment about machines was a put-down, intended to trivialise your work. It was more in regret that machines are replacing so many things in life. My passion is for woodwork, and like you, I have made many unique things to my own design, and spent hundreds of hours over getting it right, and like you, I don't use automated tools (though many others do). The work, as you say, is cathartic, and if done as a present for somebody else, is the more valuable for the time and patience you have put into it.

    Beautiful, but like so many other things, this could be easily accomplished by a machine. A CNC router could be used with paint bottles instead of woodworking bits.

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  • It looks great, and clefrly provides a much better light. I recently converted an anglepoise lamp to take an LED downlighter in my workshop because filament bulbs were always blowing. So far, so good.I hope I'm wrong, but the bulbs you used look like the Chinese style of LED bulb, with lots of little square LED elements in them. If so, good luck with them. I used that style for kitchen downlighters, because the advert said they were good for 100,000 hours. In reality, 8 out of the 12 I bought had failed in under two years. (I calculate less than 1,500 hours)

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  • zanod commented on ariellehein's instructable Mycelial Forms

    I saw a TV programme a while back that showed mycelium being used as an ecological replacement for polystyrene in packaging, and I wondered about its application for model aircraft. Can you say anything about its strength to weight ratio? How does its tensile and compression strength compare with polystyrene?You said something rather concerning in the instructions - "Mold can be dangerous, and is difficult to get rid of once it starts". Could you expand on that? I know dry rot is a real problem in houses, and if anybody unwittingly introduced something like that, he might regret ever experimenting with it. Then you say "if this happens to you it is usually a sign that you should start over" I would have thought it might be more appropriate to say "if this ha…

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    I saw a TV programme a while back that showed mycelium being used as an ecological replacement for polystyrene in packaging, and I wondered about its application for model aircraft. Can you say anything about its strength to weight ratio? How does its tensile and compression strength compare with polystyrene?You said something rather concerning in the instructions - "Mold can be dangerous, and is difficult to get rid of once it starts". Could you expand on that? I know dry rot is a real problem in houses, and if anybody unwittingly introduced something like that, he might regret ever experimenting with it. Then you say "if this happens to you it is usually a sign that you should start over" I would have thought it might be more appropriate to say "if this happens to you it is usually a sign that you should get your house on the market as quickly as possible",

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  • zanod commented on ludektalian's instructable Speed HeadUp Display

    How distracting is this at night? I realise that LEDs can be dimmed, but how does it work out?

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  • My brother did one about 50 years ago. He sprayed the tank white, then stretched lace over it from an old lace curtain, and sprayed it black, so the black went through all the holes in the lace. He then clear-lacquered it all and polished it.It gave the appearance of white lace on a black tank - and the result was stunning.

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  • felipemundy - In the end result, the -F wasn't a problem for me either - it turned out to be something different, but when I went to AVRfreaks for help, one of the guys noticed it in about 50mS, and flagged it, then they all started discussing it. They have seen it pretty often as a cause of problems.AVRdude takes a bunch of parameters from the command line, among which is the chip type. When AVRdude looks at the target chip, it reads its signature, which is a 3-byte number, and compares it with what it should be according to the chip type in the parameters. That way, it avoids destroying chips if you have accidentally put in the wrong type. If, however, you have put a -F among your parameters, it ignores the result of the test - though I think it still logs something to the screen. I…

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    felipemundy - In the end result, the -F wasn't a problem for me either - it turned out to be something different, but when I went to AVRfreaks for help, one of the guys noticed it in about 50mS, and flagged it, then they all started discussing it. They have seen it pretty often as a cause of problems.AVRdude takes a bunch of parameters from the command line, among which is the chip type. When AVRdude looks at the target chip, it reads its signature, which is a 3-byte number, and compares it with what it should be according to the chip type in the parameters. That way, it avoids destroying chips if you have accidentally put in the wrong type. If, however, you have put a -F among your parameters, it ignores the result of the test - though I think it still logs something to the screen. I believe that in rare cases, you can get a processor that has a corrupted signature, in which case, you can still program it by using the -F - but it should only ever be used in a one-off situation.

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  • When I started in AVR processing, this article was very helpful - but also costly, as I have just lost 4 ATtiny85's as a result of it. I went to the guys at AVRFreaks to ask if they were recoverable, and they immediately picked out the "-F" in the parameter string to AVRDude, which is a frequent cause of questions to their forum.See the thread at http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/my-at85-bricked-can-it-be-recovered#comment-2309006I was asked to update this thread with the following (from them)..."WARNING! Never, NEVER, use the -F switch unless you know exactly what you're doing and understand the possible consequences. The -F switch incapacitates checks that you've selected the correct AVR model, and results in AVRDUDE "blindly" programming your chip as if it was th…

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    When I started in AVR processing, this article was very helpful - but also costly, as I have just lost 4 ATtiny85's as a result of it. I went to the guys at AVRFreaks to ask if they were recoverable, and they immediately picked out the "-F" in the parameter string to AVRDude, which is a frequent cause of questions to their forum.See the thread at http://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/my-at85-bricked-can-it-be-recovered#comment-2309006I was asked to update this thread with the following (from them)..."WARNING! Never, NEVER, use the -F switch unless you know exactly what you're doing and understand the possible consequences. The -F switch incapacitates checks that you've selected the correct AVR model, and results in AVRDUDE "blindly" programming your chip as if it was the one you've selected on the AVRDUDE command line. If it actually isn't (e.g. you've made a typo on the command line) then it might render your AVR "bricked" (impossible to program) and hard to resurrect from that state, possibly requiring a "parallel programmer" (a quite rare type of programmer these days - your programmer most likely isn't one of those).REPEAT: Never, NEVER, use the -F switch on the avrdude command line. If you're having trouble programming your AVR then there is a fault somewhere and -F is not the solution!Also, see http://www.nongnu.org/avrdude/user-manual/avrdude_...for the command line parameters.

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  • I have seen many negative comments on the web about low cost Chinese LED lights, and my own experience has not been good. I bought eight 240V LED light bulbs (replacements for bayonet incandescent down-lights) in the fond belief that they would last a very long time. Within a couple of months, two of the bulbs failed, so for the sake of getting matching bulbs, I ordered four more. Now, a year after initial installation, a total of five have failed, so I have seven of the Chinese ones and one local replacement from the hardware store. The Chinese ones are cold white, but I was unable to get a colour-matched one in the UK.The bulbs are completely glass-encapsulated, so I can't get into them. They contain a matrix of 60 LEDs, and each time one has failed, it has been a single LED, but t…

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    I have seen many negative comments on the web about low cost Chinese LED lights, and my own experience has not been good. I bought eight 240V LED light bulbs (replacements for bayonet incandescent down-lights) in the fond belief that they would last a very long time. Within a couple of months, two of the bulbs failed, so for the sake of getting matching bulbs, I ordered four more. Now, a year after initial installation, a total of five have failed, so I have seven of the Chinese ones and one local replacement from the hardware store. The Chinese ones are cold white, but I was unable to get a colour-matched one in the UK.The bulbs are completely glass-encapsulated, so I can't get into them. They contain a matrix of 60 LEDs, and each time one has failed, it has been a single LED, but they must all be in series because when it happens, the bulb goes dim. I hope you have better luck - though you can.at least, replace short sections.

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  • zanod commented on ThomasVDD's instructable Hard Drive Sander

    When you're running up the motor on a RC model, you always start from zero throttle then increase it. As you increase the throttle, the frequency sent to each winding increases, and the motor ramps up its speed. Maybe the motor just follows the frequency. Is there any feedback from the motor to the ESC to tell it the speed of the motor? There are only three wires. So if you tried to spin the motor initially with a frequency equivalent to running speed, it's quite possible the motor wouldn't turn.

    Anybody got an old IBM 3330?

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  • "the cost will never provide a benefit over buying electrical power off the grid"... so all these huge solar farms covering hectares of land, are running at a loss?I don't think so.

    When speaking about sealing the panels in plastic, you say "compared with the trade off of weatherproofing, which enables one to take the panel into real sunlight, I thought it was worthy". Does this indicate that sealing them in plastic precludes taking them into direct sunlight? It's confusing, because you later speak about using mirrors to focus more sunlight onto them.How hot can they get in direct sunlight? It should be noted that items assembled with hot-melt glue will come apart if left locked in a car in Summer.

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  • It's not working for me. My project is called "Reg2Scope", and the hex file is called "Reg2Scope.hex"When I try to send the file to my target (ATtiny85), everything seems to work ok - the fuses are written etc, but it fails when trying to write "main.hex" - which doesn't exist. It appears that $(ProjectDir)Debug\$(ItemFileName).hexdoes not substitute the right name.BTW, I'm using the currently-available Studio-7. Your instructions were written for Studio-6.

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