A Suitcase From Jerry Can

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Introduction: A Suitcase From Jerry Can

It is no matter your profession or your age, this suitcase from a jerrycan will ensure that you travel in style.

How I did it - you can check by looking DIY video or you can follow up instructions below.

For this project you will need:

Materials:

Jerry Can;

Butterfly latch: https://bit.ly/3drZPc1

Rubber Edge Seal 3m: https://goo.gl/ryXLwD

Pair of hinges;

Pop rivets for hinges and latch;

An old suitcase to reclaim a Trolley Folding Handle Mechanism;

M4 bolts and nuts;

5min epoxy (or another fast curing epoxy);

The spray can paint to change internal Jerry Can color (if wanted);

A similar shade of green paint to paint visible edges where metal will be exposed;

Masking tape and few pieces of cardboard;

Tools:

The angle grinder;

File, power file, or another tool to clean burs after the cut.

Drill and bits;

Pop rivets tool;

Screwdriver;

Utility knife;

Clamps and some other usual bits and bobs which is laying around the workshop.

Step 1: Preparation

Back in a few years I used a Jerrycan in another project and transformed it into a minibar (How I did that DIY video CLICK HERE). Since that day I kept another idea in my mind which today will see the daylight.

First I covered both jerrycan sides with a piece of the cardboard to protect the surface from scratches along the fabrication process.

Step 2: First Cut

Next split the can in half. In the place where the angle grinder wasn’t able to reach - I finished the cut with a rotary tool.

Step 3: More Cutting

When the cut was done one part still has this pressed metal edge which must be removed.

Step 4: Cleaning All Sharp Edges

To clean all sharp edges I used my homemade power file. This is a very useful attachment to the angle grinder which I build recently. Here is the link to full DIY build video CLICK HERE.

Step 5: Rubber Edge Seal

To cover all edges I used this rubber edge seal. It is flexible and nicely bends over the corners. I bought it locally, but CLICK HERE to get the equivalent product. Just in case if you want to get it online.

Installation is very simple - just pressed it on the metal edge.

Step 6: The Hinges

I’m planning to use those small hinges, so marked and drilled holes for rivets. A bit of trimming was needed to get a nice and tight fit.

I fixed the hinges temporarily with bolts and nuts because I will need to disassemble it again. I want to paint it inside when all metalwork will be done.

Step 7: The Butterfly Latch

To keep the suitcase closed and secured I’ll use this butterfly latch. This type of latch is commonly used in heavy-duty music equipment transportation boxes. I’m my case I don’t need much holding power, but it looks cooler than standard latches.

To make marking easier I made a simple template from a piece of cardboard. And the rest part of the job was made by an angle grinder, rotary tool, and a drill.

Step 8: A Bit of Painting

Since all metal works were completed - it was a perfect time to change the internal suitcase color.

The rest of the open metal edges were covered with a similar shade of green paint. A small detail, but it makes a big difference in the finished item.

Step 9: Installing Hinges

Hinges were installed permanently with the pop rivets painted in green. The color wasn't exactly the same tone, but it was quite close.

Step 10: Installing ​the Butterfly Latch

The butterfly latch was fixed in the same technique. The only difference was that this time I added a washer on the opposite side to achieve more strength.

When all rivets were fixed I reinstalled the rubber edge seal.

Step 11: Reusing Parts From Old Suitcase

I borrowed a Trolley Folding Handle Mechanism from this suitcase.

Step 12: Fixing Bottom Part

Removed cardboard protection from the back of a Jerry Can, found the right place for it, marked, drilled, and attached it with few pop rivets.

Step 13: Fixing Upper Part

With the upper part, I needed to disassemble the handle a bit to get access to install the third pop rivet.

Step 14: Fixing the Second Bottom Part

Lastly installed the second bottom stand part. Since it has to act as support only a bit of modification was needed.

Step 15: Removing Cardboard Protection

This cardboard did its job very well, not a single scratch was left.

Step 16: Finished Product

Ye ye, I’m guessing you all are saying that: “There no way you’ll be able to get in the plain with this suitcase”.And you will probably be right. However, I could use it everywhere else. And what is most important - It definitely pops out from the mass of others.

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    12 Comments

    0
    Alex in NZ
    Alex in NZ

    11 months ago

    Hilarious and practical! Well done and thank you for sharing your work :-)

    0
    Meglymoo87
    Meglymoo87

    12 months ago

    That's really cool

    0
    Veets
    Veets

    12 months ago

    It's beautiful and well done. One question: is it loud? I made a custom flight case before (the core was fiberglass and epoxy over plywood, the whole thing covered with ballistic nylon luggage fabric), and the walls echoed with every bump I rolled over. I wonder if your metal can has the same effect.
    Also, I had no trouble flying with it, but the airline clerk in Germany gave it a funny look when I checked in and asked if I was sure it would survive the trip. I had no doubts about it, but it was a little like someone calling your child ugly. :-)

    0
    mikemce
    mikemce

    12 months ago on Introduction

    Imagine the looks on the faces of TSA personnel when you wheel what appears to be a fuel container onto an aircraft - Big Fun! Seriously, I would not advise using this for air travel.

    0
    jrial
    jrial

    12 months ago

    Hahah, love the irony of posting this in the midst of a pandemic that prevents most of us from traveling. But dang, that thing is so cool!

    0
    Aaaecm
    Aaaecm

    12 months ago

    I don't know where to start. Beautiful craftsmanship and a wonderful result. Really. I SO want one. I'm sure this will rise to the top of my "to-do" list quickly. So many uses and it does stand out. The video was terrific. Your Instructable is well thought out and easy to understand. Thank you for posting! I will be following you. This is why I love Instructables.com!

    0
    nic.bryan.73
    nic.bryan.73

    Reply 12 months ago

    This would probably look pretty sharp as a roadside kit for a 4x4. Leave off the suitcase parts and drop it in next to the actual fuel. Keep jumper cables, chains, cargo straps, all organized inside it, where they won't track mud into your vehicle.

    0
    rlagill
    rlagill

    12 months ago

    To facilitate your actually getting through airport security in a timely manner with this great hack, I would suggest that you create (or repurpose) an internal (perhaps mesh?) bag which would hold your contents, that you can easily and quickly remove to display the inside surfaces of your roll-on jerry can suitcase. BRAVO ZULU!

    0
    mstasiak
    mstasiak

    12 months ago

    That looks so awesome!

    0
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    12 months ago

    That looks slick - great job :D