Giant Sidewalk Chalk

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Introduction: Giant Sidewalk Chalk

Super-sized sidewalk chalk!

Have you eaten way too many Pringles in quarantine and have a giant bag of plaster laying around? Make some giant sidewalk chalk!

Supplies

Materials:

2+ Pringles cans

Plaster of Paris

Duct tape

Tempura paint (optional, make sure it's washable and non toxic)

Water

Empty milk jug (not pictured)

Tools:

Bucket

Stir stick

Plastic cups (for scooping/measuring)

Cutting device

Can Opener

Step 1: Prep the Pringles Cans

Eat all the Pringles!

Once the cans are empty, use a can opener to remove the bottom of one Pringles can so that it is now a Pringles tube!

Step 2: Make a Mega Can

Attach the two cans together top to top with duct tape so you have one very long can. Connecting them top to top will make it easier to get off at the end. Make sure its sealed really well so plaster won't leak out of the seam. It's easier with a second person to help line up the cans.

Step 3: Make a Wide Mouth Funnel

Cut the top off of a milk jug to create a wide mouth funnel for pouring the plaster into the cans.

Step 4: Mix the Plaster

We mixed roughly 6 plastic cups of plaster powder with about 4-5 cups of water for a good pourable plaster mixture. The exact proportions aren't super important, just make sure that it isn't too dry or too thin, err on the side of it being too dry so you don't have to worry as much about leaks. If you want to make colored chalk add in about a half a plastic cup of tempura paint into the mix before adding the water. Make sure the paint you use is non toxic and washable, so you don't stain the concrete or harm the environment. Paint marketed towards kids usually meets these standards.

Step 5: Fill the Molds

Use the milk jug funnel from earlier to help fill the cans. This is definitely easier with a second set of hands to steady the cans and funnel. Be sure to work fairly quickly as plaster only has a 5-10 minute work period before it starts to cure. Fill it all the way to the top!

Find somewhere to leave them upright for about 20-24 hours to fully cure.

We tried lining the cans with wax paper, but it ended up giving a worse finish and made it harder to demold at the end than just the plain can.

Step 6: Demold Your Giant Chalk!

Start by removing the duct tape from the middle and then tear away the Pringles tubes from the plaster! The cardboard was still a bit damp and made it easy to tear off along the seam of the mega can. The chalk will also still be slightly damp and need another 24 hours or so to fully dry.

Step 7: Draw Something!

Make a giant sidewalk drawing with your new homemade giant chalk!

Super-Size Speed Challenge

First Prize in the
Super-Size Speed Challenge

2 People Made This Project!

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19 Comments

0
rburr2
rburr2

11 months ago

Are they likely to break in half easier? Is it possible to add a dowel rod in the middle to make it stronger?

0
Mackramer
Mackramer

11 months ago

Really great idea! Thanks for sharing

3
lclaiborne
lclaiborne

1 year ago

Nice! I wanted to do a mural all the way down the driveway one weekend, but the chalk is pricey and badly colored. This fixes my problem! 😁 Thanks, excellent!

0
friedpotatoes
friedpotatoes

Reply 1 year ago

Do It! You could probably up the paint content a bit to get more vibrant chalk, but do a small scale test and see if it has issues with staining the concrete or something though first! We didn't have any issues getting it off the sidewalk though with a hose, so it would probably be fine.

0
DianaHM
DianaHM

1 year ago

This is really great!!

3
zakbobdop
zakbobdop

1 year ago

For all your highway coloring needs!

1
lclaiborne
lclaiborne

Reply 1 year ago

🤣🤣🤣

1
MTKapp27
MTKapp27

1 year ago

Instead of pringles cans, you can 3D print out molds and make different shapes/objects.
Pretty neat!

0
friedpotatoes
friedpotatoes

Reply 1 year ago

Oh totally! I would wonder if it would have any issues coming out of the mold with the layer lines? The plaster picked up all the tiny details in the cans. You might have to do a two part mold or use tpu? Try it and see!

4
RichardBronosky
RichardBronosky

1 year ago

This is great. I clicked it hoping there was an aspect of reusing chalk butts that get left over when my kids get almost finished with sidewalk chalk. But, as an added feature, I could place the chalk butts in the bottom of the can. So, I'm going to try that. I'm also going to try making rainbow/tie-dye chalk. Great idea with the plaster-of-paris! I had no idea. This opens up so many project options.

0
friedpotatoes
friedpotatoes

Reply 1 year ago

The consistency is really close to store bought chalk, I would bet you could either crush up the old ends, or just toss them in the mold and it would work great! There was still some white plaster left when I mixed the blue and it made a nice marbled effect on the sides of the bucket, I bet if you mixed colors separately and then poured them in together it would make some nice effects.

2
jeanniel1
jeanniel1

1 year ago

Brilliant! I love sidewalk chalk and the bigger the better and longer lasting!

0
friedpotatoes
friedpotatoes

Reply 1 year ago

Honestly! We made some big drawing all down the sidewalk and still have most of it left for another day!

1
seamster
seamster

1 year ago

Fantastic, I love this idea! :D