Heisseliebe - "Hot-Love" From the Dolomite Mountains

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Introduction: Heisseliebe - "Hot-Love" From the Dolomite Mountains

About: I love cooking, finding out about everything, and craft-work. You can read about read enthralling adventures and discover enticing recipes on a blog I nurture to keep my writing alive.

If you go to the Dolomite Mountains in the North-East of Italy, one of the desserts that you have to try is called Heisseliebe, which is German for “hot-love”. It’s a mixture of hot raspberries and cold cream, with vanilla ice-cream. As you probably noticed, the dessert’s name is in German, although it is made just near the border in Italy. As it is close to the border with Austria, there is a really interesting bilingual/bi-cultural phenomenon going on there.

I’m sure than the creators of Hot-love called it that just to make people titter and giggle nervously when they order it in restaurants and cafés, so that the waiters have something to laugh about.

It’s very simple to make: just vanilla ice-cream, cooked raspberries and whipped cream. As with all recipes with very few ingredients, the quality of each thing is very important. Heisseliebe will taste tremendously different if you make it with freshly whipped cream, homemade vanilla ice-cream, and in-season raspberries rather than cream from a can, commercial ice-cream and canned raspberries.

Though, I have to say that both of the resulting desserts will taste wonderful.

Step 1: Ingredients

For 4 people

  • Vanilla ice-cream
  • 500 g Raspberries (4 cups, 17.6 oz)
  • 1 Tbsp White Sugar
  • Double Cream

Note on the raspberries: You can either use all fresh, or a mixture of fresh and frozen, as I did this time that I made the recipe. I used 100 g of fresh and 400 g of frozen. I did this because fresh raspberries are really expensive right now! If you do the same thing, cook the frozen ones and leave the fresh ones whole to scatter over the dessert.

I have not given exact measurements for the ice-cream or the cream, as that really depends on how much of each thing you would like to have.

Step 2: ​Raspberry Preparation

Put the raspberries in a small saucepan with the sugar, saving a few for decoration.

Heat them until they start to boil.

Take them off the heat and gently mash them with the back of a spoon or fork.

Step 3: ​Ice-cream Preparation

Either use a good commercial vanilla ice-cream, or make it yourself if you own an ice-cream maker.

I sometimes make an easy vanilla ice-cream with 3/4 cup white sugar, 2 cups cream, 1 cup milk and 1/2 tsp vanilla essence. Mix these ingredients together and churn them in the ice-cream maker. This time around, I used the ice-cream you see in the photo above as I was too lazy to get my ice-cream maker going. :D

Step 4: Cream Preparation

Whip the cream with a whisk or handheld beaters until it becomes thick.

Step 5: ​Dessert Assembly

  • Put one or two scoops of ice-cream in individual bowls.
  • Spoon hot raspberry sauce around the scoops.
  • Add a spoonful or two of whipped cream.
  • Scatter fresh raspberries over the dessert.
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    4 Discussions

    0
    OutofPatience
    OutofPatience

    1 year ago

    My Mama used to do a similar dish in my childhood using strawberries (or plums...or peaches...whatever was in season.) I used to think we were simply being ridiculously "decadent", but perhaps it was the influence of the years we spent in Austria when I was a toddler! Who knew?!! At any rate, I still love vanilla ice cream, whipped cream, and fruit fixed like this. Thanks for the reminder!

    0
    Italiankiwiblog
    Italiankiwiblog

    Reply 1 year ago

    I'm glad I could bring back a good memory. I grew up in NZ and for us it was also very "decadent" when we got to have vanilla ice-cream with freshly stewed fruit as dessert! :D

    0
    Italiankiwiblog
    Italiankiwiblog

    1 year ago

    Thanks! I'm sure it is wide-spread in those areas. It's so simple, yet tasty, it's bound to be all over that area! I find the border areas of Europe incredibly interesting for their mix of languages and culture. I didn't know about Ladin. I'll have to look it up!

    0
    t.rohner
    t.rohner

    1 year ago on Step 5

    Very nice Instructable and a "hot" desert.
    I like it very much. I actually have seen it in Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Italy.
    By the way, there is a 3rd language spoken in the Dolomites called Ladin.