How to Grow Broccoli Sprouts in a Jar

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Introduction: How to Grow Broccoli Sprouts in a Jar

About: Army Vet. I love learning & being creative. I am back!

Growing broccoli sprouts at home in a jar is an easy process that can have major health benefits due to the high sulforaphane content. In this Instructable, I will take you through the entire process from start to finish.


Supplies

  • Wide-mouth jars, preferably the 1 quart size
  • Broccoli Seeds - 3 Tablespoons (the Brand I am using is "Food to Live")
  • Sprouting Lids, I like the stainless steel ones
  • Light Source or Sunny window sill
  • Tupperware containers or bowls

Holly Mann is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Step 1: Full Video on How to Grow Broccoli Sprouts at Home in a Jar

For those who prefer things in a video format, the full video on sprouting broccoli seeds is here.

Step 2: First Evening of Soaking

For those who prefer a video tutorial instead of reading the instructions, you can go to Step 6 for the full video.

I recommend that when you are going to start your first batch, that you do so in the evening, right before bed. Measure out 3 tablespoons of sprouts and pour that into your clean one-quart jar. Put the sprouting lid onto the jar. Then, rinse the seeds by filling the jar up with water, swirling it around and pouring it out. I do this two times.

Then fill up the jar about half-way with water and leave the water in it. Then, place the jar either into a cabinet, or you can set it on a dark counter or you can place it in the refrigerator overnight. I'm sharing several options for placement, but to be honest I haven't noticed a change in the germination rate with any of the options. Some people think that certain methods create faster germination. If you've had any experiences with that, please share in the comments. I haven't noticed a major change but lately, I've been placing it in the refrigerator overnight. It should be soaking for anywhere form 8-12 hours.

Step 3: First Day & Rinsing the Broccoli Seeds

When you wake up the next morning, go and pour out the water that was in the jar. Then, fill up the jar again to rinse the seeds. After rinsing, be sure to really shake the water out of the jar. Shake it and shake it and shake it again to get out excess water. After you do that, try to turn the jar in your hand to allow for the seeds to coat the sides of the jar. Then, set it at an angle in a small tupperware container or bowl so that any other excess water can drain into that container. Leave it like that until later on in the evening, close to the time you are about to go to bed. At that time, fill the jar up again, swirl it around and rinse it out. Then, repeat the process to shake all the water out and set it into the tupperware or bowl. If you want to rinse it more than two times a day, that is just fine too.

Step 4: Day-By-Day Growth & Rinsing

After a few days of this, you will begin to see the sprouting process as growth occurs. Continue to rinse and follow the same step as the last one. The most important thing to be aware of is to be careful to really get rid of excess water, to prevent mold or other issues. Personally, I have never had that happen but I have heard of it happening to others. That is why I recommend the excessive shaking of the jar to get rid of excess water.

Step 5: Around Day 5-6 of Sprouting Broccoli Seeds

Sometime around day five of sprouting, you will see that there is a lot of growth. If you see the image of me holding the jar, that is around day five (sometimes six) of sprouting for me. Please note that the amount of growth you have may be different as there are so many variables that can impact how long it takes. But, once my jar is as full as you see it in that photo, I then move onto this step.

In this step, the sprouts are really beginning to fill up a lot of the jar. I will then fill up the jar with water and remove the sprouting lid. As the water fills the jar, many of the little brown round seeds which were broken open will float to the top. I then take my spoon and remove a lot of the seeds. I do not remove all of them and it's no big deal to me that they are in there. But, I do like to get rid of some of the excess. I always do this approximately two days before I finish growing them when the jar is about as full as you see it in the photo in this step.

After that, I put the lid back and and do a thorough rinse. This step, honestly, is tricky. I recommend watching my full video because I share more details about it. But, I have noticed that many people try to stop the growth process when it's about as full as my jar is in the photo. Most people do that out of fear it might go bad, rancid or get moldy. I try to wait about two days after it's at this growth stage, to conclude the process. If I wait and continue with the daily rinses, then the growth is massive and fills up the jar fully.

Step 6: Final Days of Growth - Finishing Up the Broccoli Sprouting Process

Once the growth is where it was in the last step, the next day as it grows I will then place the jar in front of a light to help with growth. I would put it in front of a window but we have very little sun where I'm at and it would be colder by the window. I try to turn the jar a couple of times while it is in front of the light.

Usually about two days after the last step, I will then wake up and plan to have my final day of growth for the broccoli sprouts. I will do a really good final rinse. I will then shake the jar out excessively. Then, I use a pair of tongs to pull the sprouts out of the jar and place them into a larger rectangular tupperware or pyrex dish. I sometimes use two tupperwares for one jar. But, it depends on how much I made. I will then fold up a piece of paper town and place it into the bottom portion of the tupperware (which you can see in the photo). I then lean the tupperware up against something so it's on an angle and any excess water can drain into the paper towel. I try to change that paper towel at least once. In addition, I will place my little light nearby to help with its final day of growth and to help dry it out.

After this is all done, you can store it in the refrigerator to use it up within a week or put it in the freezer. I personally freeze it in a large ziplock bag and then use it in smoothies. I tend to use about 1/2 cup per smoothie when I make them.

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    14 Comments

    0
    cece01
    cece01

    Question 5 months ago

    Hi, I was wondering if I can use the excess seeds that I strain off in step 5?

    0
    DrGramPam
    DrGramPam

    5 months ago on Introduction

    Holly, I love your instructions, and I'm going right along with them. I have a different lid that I found before your site, from Amazon, and I really like it. I use tons of Mason jars, and had already switched to re-usable white plastic lids to avoid rusting. I loved the design of this lid, and six of them came in the pack, 3 green and 3 yellow.

    IMG_1574.JPGIMG_1573.JPG
    0
    HollyMann
    HollyMann

    Reply 5 months ago

    DrGramPam, thank you for the nice comment and for sharing these photos and info about the lids. They look amazing! I too love the white plastic lids as well!

    0
    SamanthaE21
    SamanthaE21

    Question 1 year ago

    So, to grow sprouts do I specifically need sprout seeds or can I get sprouts from "sprouting" my broccoli seeds?...oh ya....and can I just make a screen lid or is that just not a very wise thing to do? Thanks

    0
    GardenGranny
    GardenGranny

    1 year ago

    I have been making sprouts since the 1970's using mason jars and screen tops. In all these years, I have NEVER had an issue with bacteria or mold. I run the mason jar and lid through my dishwasher before starting a new batch and made a wood frame that holds the jar at the perfect angle for draining. Sometimes I think the internet introduces us to people who worry about "everything" so we start being concerned about the "dangers" of sprouting. Relax folks...this is NOT rocket science. If it starts to smell "off" then toss your batch out, and buy your seeds from a reputable source. Great tutorial...now let's all get busy creating some healthy greens! Good luck!

    0
    j.desgagnes
    j.desgagnes

    Reply 1 year ago

    What constitutes an "off" smell anyway? When I tried making them the first time I found them to be stinky but I can be sensitive to smells and could have been somewhat paranoid but wanting to play it safe lol. Are they supposed to have any kind of smell or if you smell anything at all toss them and get new seeds? Thank you :)

    2
    nickfank
    nickfank

    1 year ago

    Nice instructable! I've been working on perfecting broccoli sprouts for some time and have several ideas to add-

    - It's really hard to avoid growing bacteria too, and broccoli seeds in particular have a surface that is hard to clean by just rinsing. I prep my seeds by soaking for a couple of hours in a solution of 1 Tbsp Hydrogen Peroxide in 3/4 C water. It won't harm the seeds.

    -To avoid contamination, I flip the curved screens around so they are concave (curve upward into the jar.) That provides the same air surface area, but makes it less likely that bacteria will come into contact with the wet seeds when the jar is resting screen-down.

    -We're on well water, so I boil a big pot of water to use for rinsing. Probably not necessary if you're on city water with chlorine.

    0
    chefspenser
    chefspenser

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi Nick...use your H2O2 for sterilization of the jars too...I keep a spray bottle handy in hte kitchen for counters and suck. Good luck!

    0
    HollyMann
    HollyMann

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi Nick! I love that suggestion of soaking them for a couple of hours first. I wonder if vinegar would be a good option too - though it might be a bit harsh. That is also a great tip about flipping the screens. Interesting about the water. I have been using water from my reverse osmosis system which really cleans it out. I almost wonder if it would better if it had more minerals, but it seems to work just fine. I too have well water but it's not the safest. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences - I will definitely pre-soak it next time.

    1
    carlozousa
    carlozousa

    1 year ago

    hi, very nice tutorial. I was wondering, from the photos, that you put water directly from the tap. doesn't the chlorine in the water too agressive for applying directly on the seeds?
    thanks!

    0
    HollyMann
    HollyMann

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thank you. :) I should have mentioned this in the instructable, but I actually used filtered water from my reverse osmosis system at home. I agree that normal tap water might have too much chlorine in it.

    0
    carlozousa
    carlozousa

    Reply 1 year ago

    thanks! i have one of those too. i'm trying this with romanesc cowliflower ...

    1
    hermanted111
    hermanted111

    1 year ago on Step 1

    I like this. Can this be used for Bean Sprouts or Alfalfa Spouts? I'm making this this weekend.

    0
    HollyMann
    HollyMann

    Reply 1 year ago

    Sorry for the late reply. I have read about others sprouting all sorts of things in jars in a similar manner. It might be just a little bit different of a process, or take a different amount of time, depending on what you are sprouting.