Indestructible Rubber Bands

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Introduction: Indestructible Rubber Bands

About: Oh Canada!

Indestructible Rubber Bands

Some times called Ranger Bands, these bands can be made from waste that you may have laying around the garage. If you are a biker or have kids who bike, then there is a good chance you have an old bicycle inner tube laying around. Maybe you were going to patch it someday, but you can use it to make many very useful items.

These bands are virtually indestructible and can be used to help store, pack and even protect your gear.

Unlike ordinary rubber bands like you find on broccoli or lobster claws, these bands are made for the elements and can last indefinitely.

They are very simple. Just cut strips any width and voila, Ranger Bands. On-line you can purchase official ranger bands 20 for $10.00. Or you can make you own out of trash. You can even buy a new inter-tube for around $7.00 and cut many more then 20 bands.

Below you will find some of the simple uses I came up with and use, but the options are unlimited. Once you see this you will see that it is a very simple Instructable but very useful.

This is one gear hack that I wish I would have learned sooner. I hope you enjoy.

CHADOVISION

Supplies

  • Old bicycle inner tube
  • Scissors

Step 1: Old Inner Tube

Re-purposing an old inner tube can keep them out of land fill virtually forever. I could have simply patched this tube but making these bands was much more useful.

You can use any diameter tube for this project. The tubes do stretch quite a bit .

If you don't have a bike tube around you can most likely ask one of your local bike shops. They will most likely just have some in the trash. They may even give them to you for free.

Step 2: Simply Cut With Scissors

Bike inner tubes cut very easily.

Step 3: Cut Your Bands to Any Size

You can cut your bands any width you desire depending on the intended use.

Step 4: Example Use #1: EDC Tins

These indestructible bands are frequently used to secure your everyday carry tins. The smaller diameter bands are perfect for single tin. While the larger diameter bands can secure multiple tins or secure extra gear.

You can see my every day carry tins here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Apocalypse-Survival-Prep-Bug-out-Bag-EDC/

Step 5: Example Use #2: Secure Your Ratchet Straps

Do you ever just throw your ratchet straps in the back of your truck or in a bag and then when you need them you spend 1/2 hour untangling them?

With these types of bands you can secure your straps nice and neat over and over.

Step 6: Example Use #3: Secure Walking Poles

Keep your gear neat and tidy.

Step 7: Example Use #4: Tidy Equipment

Use these bands to secure cables, wires and plugs with their hardware.

Step 8: Example Use #5: Protect Batteries

Wrapping your batteries with the rubber bands can protect then while in storage and in you pack while traveling. Wrapping batteries can also protect them from discharging. This system obviously helps you keep them together.

Step 9: Example Use #6: Secure Your Ropes

These bands can be used over and over to aid in keeping your ropes, cables and even hoses neat and tidy.

Step 10: Example Use #7: Secure Utensils

Packing for camping and travel can be messy. Using these bands you can keep your utensils all in one place.

Step 11: Example Use #8: Secure Tent Pegs

While camping I always seem to find extra tent pegs in the ground. Plus it is always handy to have a couple extra in your pack. Using these bands you can store your pegs altogether and in one place. BONUS because these bands do stretch you can keep adding pegs to the same stack indefinitely.

Step 12: So Many Uses...

These indestructible bands will be a key piece of your bug out bag, survival kit, tool box, garage and basement.

I hope you enjoyed this simple Instructable and feel free to check out my other similar gear hacks @ https://www.instructables.com/member/chadovision/

Thank you!

CHADOVISION

Rubber Band Speed Challenge

Participated in the
Rubber Band Speed Challenge

2 People Made This Project!

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7 Comments

0
Azze01
Azze01

1 year ago

Well described and a really neat idea. I use them in many situations wherever applicable. I just have to contradict you in terms ofdurablity:

"Unlike ordinary rubber bands like you find on broccoli or lobster claws,
these bands are made for the elements and can last indefinably"

They *are* durable and can last a pretty long time. The truth is though that these inner tubes are not made to withstand UV exposure. From my experience I can tell that under daylight these tubes tend to become brittle and start to crack. Some new tube I had hung on a nail in the garage one year ago broke along the folding lines that the tube had when it was packed in its sales box

0
chadovision
chadovision

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for adding your experience. I have not actually used these for long term outside projects. They do last on indoor projects as I have never to date had one fail.

CHADOVISION

0
Epimethius
Epimethius

1 year ago on Step 11

Good use for old inner tubes. Sources: Bicycle shops have more bad inner tubes than they manage, I request 4 blown tubes every time I visit. Probably the same for motorcycle shops. Addendum: I make bungie strapping cords by slitting the tubes long ways, and twisting them into ropes. Holds down everything on my rear bike pannier.

0
carl5blum
carl5blum

Tip 1 year ago

I've cut large strips from Truck tire intertubes to seal the hinge area on doors. They last for years, (but not forever).

0
chadovision
chadovision

Reply 1 year ago

Neat idea.

Chadovision

0
gingerbaker
gingerbaker

1 year ago on Step 12

These would be just the ticket for protecting wooden-handled axes and mauls from splintering damage up next to the head. Glue several layers on with rubber cement.

0
carl5blum
carl5blum

Reply 1 year ago

You could wrap the handle with a strip of rubber and then cover it with bands to avoid the glue. I believe the glue would fail sooner than you think. Good luck, Carl.