Recycled Flowers From DVDs, CDs, and Floppy Disks

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Introduction: Recycled Flowers From DVDs, CDs, and Floppy Disks

About: Technology Should Be Chic. Tech-Crafter, Maker, Educator, Designer of TechnoChic DIY Tech-Craft Kits

I made these flowers out of recycled CDs, DVDs, and Floppy Disks.

I don't keep flowering plants around due to my allergies, so this is a great project to make my planters colorful, upcycle outdated materials, and save me from sneezing!

I hope you enjoy this tutorial! If you want to see more of my work, you can follow me here on Instructables and on Instagram and YouTube - Please Subscribe! You can also buy tech-craft kits designed by me at TechnoChic.net.

Supplies

Step 1: Gather Materials

I've been a maker of up-cycled electronics for over 10 years. The most popular things that I make are sets of Floppy Disk Coasters that I sell on Etsy. So, I never throw away old media - I turn it into art or something useful!

For this project, I looked for some of the "odd ball" disks that were scratched or floppies that had old stickers on them that would be hard to remove. Since it's unlikely that AOL still offers me internet via floppy, I was ready to begin!

I bet you have some in your house too! If not, you *surprisingly* can still purchase them on Amazon or eBay.

Step 2: Cut the Petal Shapes

I started with the DVDs. I used scissors to cut into the disk and realized that I could separate some of the disks into two halves. This created a shiny rainbow layer and a purple iridescent layer - pretty!

I drew a petal shape on a piece of scrap paper and used it as a template to cut out the petal shapes with scissors. I rotated the shape radially while I was cutting so that all of the petals started at the inner ring of the disk and radiated outwards.

Step 3: Etch the Petals

While cutting, I realized that the scratches in the surface picked up and refracted the light being emitted from the rainbow coating. I decided to lean into this and use a dental tool (or you could use an Xacto knife or other pointy object) to etch textures into the petals.

How fun is it to SCRATCH CDs ON PURPOSE! :-D

Step 4: Glue Them Together

With all the petals made, I cut the center plastic "o" piece from another disk and used hot glue to attach all of the petals to it. I used a bead of hot glue around the center and let it dry first, then attached the matching petals from the dual-layer disk on top to give it a 3-dimensional feel.

Step 5: Add a Stem

I bent the end of a piece of floral wire and hot glued it in place in the center of the flowers.

Step 6: Make the Center Piece

To make the center of the flowers, I disassembled the floppy disk and harvested the circular metal piece and the metal "door".

  • I trimmed away the black disk with scissors to get the circular metal piece.
  • I cut strips into the door piece with scissors and rolled it into a circular log shape.
  • Then, I used hot glue to adhere the pieces in place at the center of the flower.

I was ready to decorate!

Step 7: Display Your Flowers!

Add your flowers to your favorite vase, a planter, or somewhere where there is no natural light - these flowers will live forever!

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!

For more, please follow me here on Instructables and on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - Please Subscribe! You can also buy tech-craft kits designed by me at TechnoChic.net.

Happy Making!

<3

Natasha

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    14 Comments

    2
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    10 months ago on Step 5

    I've piddled with something like this. I put the disks out near my laundry line so the birds wouldn't sit on the line and then shit on the newly-cleaned clothes. The problem, I found, was that the iridescence that I thought was a part of the DVD/CDs wasn't. It was a layer that was attached to the plastic disk so that after sitting in the sun for a while, the iridescent layer flaked off. :( I'm wondering if spray painting the plastic disks might stop that? I'd like to do something that this tutorial does because I was putting a child's whirly gig near my grape vines and espaliered fruit trees to keep birds away but the wind blew them to bits! I'm thinking that if I can modify what you're doing, then I could recycle a bunch of old disks into something useful.

    0
    Frozengeckolover
    Frozengeckolover

    Reply 2 months ago

    Most paints, and glues, will keep the label side of a CD from peeling off. I hung cds from fishing line around my garden to keep the deer away. I covered the label side with metalic paints (some I just coated with glue and glitter), so that both sides would be reflective when they twisted around in the breeze. None of the labels chipped off. Admittedly, having CDs hanging from the trees is ugly. I think I will make some of these flowers instead.

    0
    TechnoChic
    TechnoChic

    Reply 2 months ago

    Good Idea! The flowers would look good hanging like chimes too. :)

    0
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    Reply 10 months ago

    Oh, I just went to your instructable. Those are gorgeous!

    0
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    Reply 10 months ago

    Thanks! I'll try that in the future.

    0
    TechnoChic
    TechnoChic

    Reply 10 months ago

    That's a great idea. Yeah, I bet some waterproofing spray would do the trick to keep them from flaking. I would also use some sort of epoxy instead of hot glue for outdoor use - the hot glue isn't great at holding up to the wind/heat either! If you make a set please share it with me! :)

    0
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    Reply 10 months ago

    Instead of epoxy (epoxy and I don't get along.) maybe superglue? What do you think?

    0
    TechnoChic
    TechnoChic

    Reply 10 months ago

    Haha me too - I hate smelly adhesives. I did try superglue but it didn't work. It's not great at attaching plastic - it may stick for a second but then snap right off. Do you know about "Thistothat.com" ? It's always a good resource.

    Other than that, you could use holes in the plastic and metal to wrap some wire around to hold everything together. It could add an artsy wire sculpture flair and double as a secure structural connection that the wind can't break!

    0
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    Reply 10 months ago

    That's a good idea!

    1
    Cat-q-at
    Cat-q-at

    9 months ago on Step 5

    Perfect for mixed media crafting xx thank you so much for the idea xx

    0
    TechnoChic
    TechnoChic

    Reply 9 months ago

    Yes! Thank you. :)

    0
    TechnoChic
    TechnoChic

    Reply 10 months ago

    Those are pretty too! :)