STRAIGHT CUT JIG FOR CIRCULAR SAW

About: 1945 was a very good year. No, not for wine ... for me. I was born. Yes, I'm old, Father William, but brillig, and my slithy toves still gyre and gimble in the wabe. So let me welcome you to the Little Sho...

Intro: STRAIGHT CUT JIG FOR CIRCULAR SAW

While working on a project I needed to make a long straight cut. There are several ways I could've accomplished this, but in case this need came up in the future why not build a jig to make my life easier. This jig can be adapted for any length cut. It does the work of a track saw, a tapering guide, a fine, precise trimmer. Yes, you can buy things to do these jobs, but heck, I made this from scraps from my lumber cart.

This jig will be used with my circular saw. Since saws are different, I will label this jig with the name of this circular saw so I don't confuse it with the other circular saw I own. Yep, two! I own two. Couldn't you just plotz?

Step 1: TWO PIECES OF LAMINATE FLOORING

I found two pieces of laminate flooring in the lumber cart.

Step 2: TRIMMING

I trimmed off the tongues, groves and ends.

Step 3: GLUED AND SCREWED

I ripped a piece off the longest and widest board and glued and screwed it to the board and assured straightness by holding it against a straight edge--yeah, that's a level. But a very straight level. This will act as a fence--a guide--a stop for the base of the circular saw.

Step 4: IT'S ALL ABOUT THE BASE, 'BOUT THE BASE, 'BOUT THE BASE

I squared the blade to the circular saw base. I measured the base of the circular saw from the blade to the edge. I made sure the wide board from the strip I glued and screwed to its edge was wider than the base measurement. See what I mean by it being all about the base. No trouble.

Step 5: SQUARING THE JIG

I glued and screwed a perpendicular piece to the bottom of the jig protruding and extending to the left (because I'm right handed. In fact, I'm so right handed that I honestly believe my left hand belongs to someone else.). I used a speed square to square up the inside angle.

TIP: The last image shows how you get your 'good the the last drop' of glue. Yeah, I'm frugal with my glue.

Step 6: THE FIRST CUT IS THE DEEPEST

To set and establish a functioning jig, take your table saw, place the base tight up against the thin strip of wood glued and screwed to act as a fence or guide or stop, and cut. Now you have an accurate guide for cutting straight lines. Always use this to cut on the waste side of the line. Just line your jig along any two points and cut. The saw will do the rest, always cutting on this line. Lots cheaper than going out and buying a track saw. It can also be used for tapered cuts as long as you don't use the bottom squaring guide.

Step 7: SQUARING THE OUTSIDE EDGE

Using my table saw jig as seen in another Instructable, I trimmed the outside edge to eliminate that small gap shown in the first picture. Nice to know how accurate the table saw jig is, huh? See the last picture.

As I've mentioned before, I have a small one and the jig I built for my small table saw will only cut boards less than a foot wide. Thus the need for a jig that would cut longer than a foot.

Step 8: FINALLY

Then I used the jig to trim off the board I was working on and needed the jig for.

And now I'm happy. I have a jig I can use numerous times and it really didn't cost me anything to build. Hope you enjoyed

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