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Charlie Chumrats

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10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Home and Garden Contest
Contest Winner First Prize in the Home and Garden Contest
Barbecue Speed Challenge
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Barbecue Speed Challenge
Furniture Contest
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Furniture Contest
Slow Cooker Challenge
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Slow Cooker Challenge
Trash to Treasure
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Trash to Treasure
Outdoor Cooking Contest 2017
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Outdoor Cooking Contest 2017
Lights Contest 2017
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Lights Contest 2017
Untouchable Challenge
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Untouchable Challenge
Breakfast Challenge 2017
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Breakfast Challenge 2017
Vegan Food Challenge
Contest Winner Grand Prize in the Vegan Food Challenge
Halloween Food Contest 2016
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Halloween Food Contest 2016
    • HIVE.1 an Experimental Low-cost High-efficiency Greenhouse
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      22 comments
  • HIVE.1 an Experimental Low-cost High-efficiency Greenhouse

    Thank you! I already want to build another- That's probably further down the road though after I have tracked how it performs thermally over the course of a summer and winter into spring.

    Here is southwestern Pennsylvania, we are no stranger to oppressive summer heat. The fan is small, but it is surprising how much air it really can evacuate, and the lower vents on the intake side are placed on the cool side of the greenhouse to draw that cooler air in. I will be posting more on the peripherals after the contest is out of judging; one of them is the addition of an oscillating wall fan that we keep plugged in during the day. This doesn't so much cool the greenhouse as it does circulate the air so that there aren't massive hot spots or a heat blanket up high. Another addition to this post will be the misting system- I ran a 1/4" irrigation line around the interior perimeter at the top of the walls and branched mist nozzles off of it, as well as a few mist nozzles on the…

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    Here is southwestern Pennsylvania, we are no stranger to oppressive summer heat. The fan is small, but it is surprising how much air it really can evacuate, and the lower vents on the intake side are placed on the cool side of the greenhouse to draw that cooler air in. I will be posting more on the peripherals after the contest is out of judging; one of them is the addition of an oscillating wall fan that we keep plugged in during the day. This doesn't so much cool the greenhouse as it does circulate the air so that there aren't massive hot spots or a heat blanket up high. Another addition to this post will be the misting system- I ran a 1/4" irrigation line around the interior perimeter at the top of the walls and branched mist nozzles off of it, as well as a few mist nozzles on the same line run to the grate of the fan. When the mist kicks on it waters everything without soaking, brings the humidity up and drops the temperature- I've watched it drop 15 degrees F in about 10mins. The goal is to connect a temperature and humidity meter to an electrically actuated valve in line with the mist system to trigger at set values. I had thought too about fastening a few panels to the frame using screw-on heavy duty snaps, but worried about the air gap it would leave open when it gets cold and the stress on the panels it would cause over time. As oppressively hot as it can get where we live in Pennsylvania, the weather can (and usually does) turn bitterly cold in the winter albeit for short periods of time. The more vents and opening I create, the more that will have to be sealed well to avoid heat loss and drafts in the cool and cold seasons. It is easier overall to mitigate the heat of a greenhouse than it is to correct a rapid loss of heat. I would LOVE to know more about your swamp cooler setup though, do you have any more information it? Was it DIY or built from plans, what powers it, is the air drawn across water or a wicking system?

    As for mushroom spawn, it is (depending on what a certain species of mushroom grows on naturally) a pasteurized or sterilized moistened substrate inoculated with spores from a specific mushroom. For wood borne mushrooms such as shiitake or lion's mane, the substrate is often sold as short wooden dowels or plugs in a sealed bag. The bags look like they are moldy but thats actually a healthy mycelial colony. A log, or stump, if drilled full of holes and the plugs are pounded in and sealed over with wax. The mycelium will continue to propagate and spread throughout the wood, consuming it as food and in turn fruiting mushrooms when the conditions are ideal. It will continue to consume and fruit off of the substrate until the nutrient level is no longer viable enough to support the mycelial co…

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    As for mushroom spawn, it is (depending on what a certain species of mushroom grows on naturally) a pasteurized or sterilized moistened substrate inoculated with spores from a specific mushroom. For wood borne mushrooms such as shiitake or lion's mane, the substrate is often sold as short wooden dowels or plugs in a sealed bag. The bags look like they are moldy but thats actually a healthy mycelial colony. A log, or stump, if drilled full of holes and the plugs are pounded in and sealed over with wax. The mycelium will continue to propagate and spread throughout the wood, consuming it as food and in turn fruiting mushrooms when the conditions are ideal. It will continue to consume and fruit off of the substrate until the nutrient level is no longer viable enough to support the mycelial colony. By that time, the wood has been broken down enough that removing or cutting down the remaining stump is much easier. It could take a long time, but it is also very hands off and produces an edible byproduct. Here is an example of Lion's mane plugs; do a quick internet search and you will find all manner of information and suppliers on the process.

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  • Wooden Two-Cockpit Runabout

    This is amazing, thank you so much for documenting and detailing all the wonderful work you did. I have been searching for exactly this for so long, a classic runabout is one of my life bucket list projects. Kudos!

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  • Crispy Smoked Wings + Golden Buffalo Sauce

    Thanks! I'm working on another set of recipes now. If I can get them done and finished over the week I'll be entering them into the "on a stick" challenge, so keep an eye out for more outdoor cooking recipes using a very unique method coming soon!

    Thank you. I promise, they're awesome and other people will think so too. You can also make these un-smoked in an oven or air fryer too but they won't have that smoky barbecue flavor. Even better, once off the smoker they can be grilled over an open flame (wood, charcoal or gas) and the sugars that were sprayed on will char really nicely into crispy grill marks. If you preheat the grill while the wings are finishing this takes no time- you'll be flipping or pulling the first wings off the grill as soon as you are getting the last ones on.

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    • Slow Smoked Barbecue Beans
      94 views
      4 favorites
      2 comments
    • Crispy Smoked Wings + Golden Buffalo Sauce
      772 views
      7 favorites
      4 comments
    • Barstool in Cherry and Steel
      1,427 views
      28 favorites
      15 comments
  • Barstool in Cherry and Steel

    Thanks. If I had known when I was young(er) how detrimental all the fumes and dust, and noise could really be... learn from my mistakes I suppose. I'm still not perfect, but at least now I what common sense I have!

    Thank you. I tried to keep the detailing as simple and understated as possible. In doing so I feel it really emphasized them.

    I appreciate that. I wanted to enter this in the furniture contest, but weather and work held the project back for far too long and I rushed it at the end when it comes to writing and editing. I have the other photos ready to upload, a lot of notes, and some slight modifications I have made (threaded inserts in the bottom of the seat to hold set screws for the back rest bracket, and some polished stainless machine screws flush mounted in the backrest to hold the vertical brackets. not that it needs these- the reason for angling the brackets is that they cant loosen on their own without a lot of effort.) but the instructable is in judging so the way it was entered is how it will remain until the contest is over. When the contest ends, check back for better editing/proofreading/ additional …

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    I appreciate that. I wanted to enter this in the furniture contest, but weather and work held the project back for far too long and I rushed it at the end when it comes to writing and editing. I have the other photos ready to upload, a lot of notes, and some slight modifications I have made (threaded inserts in the bottom of the seat to hold set screws for the back rest bracket, and some polished stainless machine screws flush mounted in the backrest to hold the vertical brackets. not that it needs these- the reason for angling the brackets is that they cant loosen on their own without a lot of effort.) but the instructable is in judging so the way it was entered is how it will remain until the contest is over. When the contest ends, check back for better editing/proofreading/ additional photographs and notes.

    I like the design, it feels great to finally have it out of my head and standing in physical form in front of me after nearly a decade. The chair i had been envisioning all along was never a barstool though, so now I will have to make an instructable on the same basic form but with low legs. Think a single continuous bent steel strap, inlayed into the surface from above the seat, suspending the wood underneath...

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  • Barstool in Cherry and Steel

    Thank you! There are a few things I would like to change, like making single piece brackets from bent steel instead of welding two pieces together- but at the moment I do not have the tools to do this. The overall aesthetic will remain the same and unchanged though. I will continually update this post as I do make altercations, both in the steps but also in a notes and conclusion at the bottom of the project. There are a few photos that didn't transfer over from Lightroom for some reason or another, and when I get them to upload they will be added and annotated as well. The hardest part of the entire project was lining up and perfectly drilling the holes for the backrest brackets, and I have the edited photos of this process to explain in a lot more detail for those interested. It is a lo…

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    Thank you! There are a few things I would like to change, like making single piece brackets from bent steel instead of welding two pieces together- but at the moment I do not have the tools to do this. The overall aesthetic will remain the same and unchanged though. I will continually update this post as I do make altercations, both in the steps but also in a notes and conclusion at the bottom of the project. There are a few photos that didn't transfer over from Lightroom for some reason or another, and when I get them to upload they will be added and annotated as well. The hardest part of the entire project was lining up and perfectly drilling the holes for the backrest brackets, and I have the edited photos of this process to explain in a lot more detail for those interested. It is a lot of precise measuring and marking (and I do not have precise measuring tools) and making sure the drilling setup is perfectly level. Once you drill the first hole, all others are easy. I would like to use this template to build a few standard height chairs and I have a plan in my mind for a lower-seated lounge chair with formed and riveted aluminum legs. I will likely link those projects to this one and vice versa.

    I appreciate that! The mark makes you just want to reach through the screen and run your hand over it, doesn't it? At least thats the objective. As much work went into the seat, it is still furniture, and and I want it to be treated as such. I built these to withstand a lot of abuse and not become static works in my house. By tapping braille into it, there is a compulsion to touch it, making it less intimidating to climb on and sit in. If you were to close your eyes and run your hand over the surface, the mark would be the first thing you notice, but there are the angles and soft curves, the rounded edges, and satin smooth finish. Sometimes you don't need your eyes to really appreciate the craftsmanship of a finished piece, and thats what this mark is really all about. With all of that sa…

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    I appreciate that! The mark makes you just want to reach through the screen and run your hand over it, doesn't it? At least thats the objective. As much work went into the seat, it is still furniture, and and I want it to be treated as such. I built these to withstand a lot of abuse and not become static works in my house. By tapping braille into it, there is a compulsion to touch it, making it less intimidating to climb on and sit in. If you were to close your eyes and run your hand over the surface, the mark would be the first thing you notice, but there are the angles and soft curves, the rounded edges, and satin smooth finish. Sometimes you don't need your eyes to really appreciate the craftsmanship of a finished piece, and thats what this mark is really all about. With all of that said, it would be a very short I'ble! You can download a braille font, or use graph paper depending on the size of the mark you want. Then, tape the piece of paper over the area where your mark is going to go and using an awl or center punch (both should have a fresh or freshly ground sharp point) imprint every dot through the paper. I used brass escutcheon pins, and held them with a pair of hemostats, tapping the pins down until they were almost in. Once they're driven almost to the surface, use a large nailset that almost covers the head of the pin and tap it down flush. The pins I was using are #18x3/4", however thats a bit long to tap them all in so close to one another without bending out of place. To rectify this I cut each individual pin at a steep angle with a pair of very heavy duty wire snips to about 3/8" long. Thats all there is to it!

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  • Dumpster Fire Pit (easy Welding Project)

    Ahhh, somebody beat me to it! I had the idea to do this but let laziness have the better of me. Excellent instructable, I will definitely be using this to build one of my own. Glad to see there are other genius minds who think alike!

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  • Turn an Old Artificial Christmas Tree Into a Giant Wreath

    Thanks! The welds for the branches are very quick- large tack welds, they only take a second each, maybe two.

    I am considering using a second tree and building an inner circle to "fill it out" some more, make a bushier wreath. With several trees you could easily make a wreath that rivals this one, or make an even larger one than this. I stopped at this outer diameter because storage is an issue for something this large, and it is perfectly sized to fit against the inside walls of the container during the off seasons.

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  • Thanks! It's as good all plated up like that as it is sliced, fried and eaten as a sandwich with mayo and an egg.

    Thank you, very much!

    Thank you so much! The plates (well actually just one plate, I kept cleaning it off and using it again for different shots) were a Target purchase. They should still have them in stock as it was a recent purchase. I saw the plate on the shelf and knew the colors of what I wanted to make would work well with it. I also look for a lot of matte or satin finish plates at thrift stores where I don't have to buy full sets, just what I need for photographing.

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  • Thanks! Shooting in a kitchen can be challenging, especially in ours which has a myriad of wall colors and textures, 4 different light color temperatures (daylight from a window, LED, halogen stove hood lights, and incandescent) all in a pretty small space. The panel light is nice because I can adjust both the blue and the yellow light spectrum independently and I use a white balance card to figure out my target color temperature. Even then, it's hard to keep uniformity in all the photos. I'm working on building a smaller second kitchen in our basement for using as a stage kitchen when doing instructables. I'd like to match or gel all lights in that room/ kitchen to match ambient daylight and paint an area of the backsplash or wall certified neutral grew, and an area flat white so that I …

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    Thanks! Shooting in a kitchen can be challenging, especially in ours which has a myriad of wall colors and textures, 4 different light color temperatures (daylight from a window, LED, halogen stove hood lights, and incandescent) all in a pretty small space. The panel light is nice because I can adjust both the blue and the yellow light spectrum independently and I use a white balance card to figure out my target color temperature. Even then, it's hard to keep uniformity in all the photos. I'm working on building a smaller second kitchen in our basement for using as a stage kitchen when doing instructables. I'd like to match or gel all lights in that room/ kitchen to match ambient daylight and paint an area of the backsplash or wall certified neutral grew, and an area flat white so that I always have a permanent white balance card hiding in plain sight.

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  • Rabbit is very similar to chicken, which will also work fine for this recipe and an upcoming recipe for using the bones. Rabbit isn't hard to find- most butcher shops can oder it if they dont already carry it.

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  • Charlie Chumrats's instructable Spring Rabbit Terrine's weekly stats:
    • Spring Rabbit Terrine
      216 views
      4 favorites
      1 comments
    • Turn an Old Artificial Christmas Tree Into a Giant Wreath
      434 views
      7 favorites
      1 comments
  • I've long wondered how accessible enameling metal is for the casual DIYer and now I know! Thanks for sharing this! How long do you normally get out of a metal screen before it becomes too burnt through to use?

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  • Thanks!

    Thank you! I have always loved the concept, I wish it were more widely used. I will be doing this again soon with a trussed chicken, will try to update and post photos of that as well.

    Thanks! Half the fun of creating an instructable is in the photography.

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    • STRING TURNED ROAST LEG OF LAMB
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      20 favorites
      4 comments
  • I actually bought that chiminea a couple years ago on discount at target after the summer/outdoor collection switched over to the back to school collection. It wouldn't be too hard to make if you have access to a welder, angle grinder, and large sheet of Corten or mild steel. Look around, I have seen this same style chiminea in a few companies outdoor collections. I will say, the steel chimineas output heat pretty well but the terra cotta ones have a lot better thermal mass and slightly smaller opening, which projects the heat very well. The tradeoff is that the steel is a LOT lighter and can be moved around.

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