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  • How to Make an Amethyst Geode Plaster Planter

    Try vibrating the form after you've poured in the plaster - not shaking! - next time you make anything with concrete or plaster. It will eliminate the tiny bubbles that are visible on the surface of your planter. For example, you can place the form together with a jigsaw without a blade on a cutting board, clamp the jigsaw down or use a little hot glue so it doesn't move around, place the cutting board on a kitchen towel folded in two or four, or on some kitchen sponges, then start the jigsaw for half a minute or so.

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  • How to Easily Ebonize Wood

    I did it on pine. You can get a very dark, coal-like black on pine too. This procedure does not rely on the tannin already in the wood. You just have to make the tea extremely concentrated (like 20 teabags in half a liter of water, boiled for a few minutes, then left to cool without taking the teabags out), and apply it repeatedly, until there's a visible change in color of the wood. You whould also let the wood dry thoroughly between applications, so each kayer is soaked somewhat into the wood, instead of drying on the surface alone. And you should also let the wood dry thoroughly before applying the vinegar, so that too is soaked a bit into the wood. The black color develops gradually, from one day to the next.

    You can use lathe or drill press chips, or in fact any kind of scrap iron, like old and crooked nails, screws, leftovers from all kinds of iron working instead of the steel wool. What I do: put all of these iron scraps into a bottle with a large opening, or a jar, until it's half full, then fill up with vinegar, then close it - at least two weeks prior to usage. Then just tumble the bottle a few times each day.

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  • Mid-Century Executive Desk

    The chair looks great too.

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  • FlorinJ commented on JGJMatt's instructable DIY Tinfoil Ribbon Speaker
    DIY Tinfoil Ribbon Speaker

    About transformers: to my knowledge, they transfer power differently at different frequencies. Won't a transformer introduce distortions?

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  • Chess Pieces Made of CONCRETE!

    You could try adding PP or glass fiber shreds to the concrete mix - something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Glass-Fiber-Glasfasern-s%C3%A4urebest%C3%A4ndiges/dp/B00LUL9PEU - to avoid pieces breaking off. Just make sure to get the length appropriate for the small dimensions of the pieces.

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  • Corn Tortillas

    Not ash. You put the ash into a sack made of multiple layers of dense cloth, so the solid particles can't get through. You put the sack opened at the top into a sieve, put the sieve on top of a big pot or bucket, and pour water through the ash, let it seep through the ash, and, reusing the same water, repeat the process a few dozen times. In the end, the water will have dissolved all (or at least most) soluble metallic oxides - many of them of highly reactive metals, such as Ca, but mainly K and Na. That's lye, and it can be used for nixtamalization. (Or soap making, for that matter, but that's a bit tricky - you have to prepare a few small batches to experimentally determine the ratio of fat to lye to use, since you don't know exactly what concentration of hydroxides you have in the lye.)

    Your video just mentioned corn flour in a slightly equivocal way - so that somebody not aware of the difference might have tried this with plain corn flour. I just thought it's useful to make sure nobody tries it that way.

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  • Corn Tortillas

    Just a note: masa harina/maseca is not regular corn flour. Masa harina is made by first boiling and soaking the whole corn grains in strongly a alcalinic solution. That introduces chemical changes to the grain which make it possible for the flour ground from it (after drying) to bind and form a dough. Plain corn flour will never make a dough.

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  • FlorinJ commented on RobBest's instructable Cat Repellent
    Cat Repellent

    My Morse practicing device was about 35-40 years ago. I built it on a breadboard, by experimenting with a transistor and various passive components, then transferred it to a piece of pine with nails in it, where I soldered pieces of wire from one nail to another to build the circuit - at the age of 10 I wasn't allowed to work with strong acids to etch a circuit board. So obviously I don't remember the details. But it was something very simple. By far not a sine, though, that I can remember - sounded much like a duck's quack.

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  • 120v Metal Foundry With Lid Switch

    Obviously I'd need to adapt the choice of parts for a higher temperature. My question was more about the possibility to have a high enough energy output compared to the energy loss through the insulation. My understanding of your answer is that with the right parts it should be. Thanks.

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  • Candied Orange Peel

    You're right, it takes a few weeks. But once coated in chocolate, they keep for months. (They never get that old, but that's another story.)

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  • Candied Orange Peel

    Make sure you pick untreated oranges. Most oranges have their rind treated with chemicals to inhibit mold and rot, which can't be cleaned off completely by washing them. (You can eliminate some of the chemicals by soaking the oranges for 5 minutes in a solution of sodium bicarbonate, but not all of them, since those chemicals get dissolved in the waxy substance that covers the orange skin, and this substance doesn't come off easily.)What I do with honey instead of sugar: mix them thoroughly after slicing with enough money to cover every bit of their surface, and then some, in a wide bowl. I then place the bowl in a well ventilated place for a few weeks, covered with a sieve or with some gauze, to keep insects away. I mix maybe once or twice a day - honey will run off in the beginning, unt…

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    Make sure you pick untreated oranges. Most oranges have their rind treated with chemicals to inhibit mold and rot, which can't be cleaned off completely by washing them. (You can eliminate some of the chemicals by soaking the oranges for 5 minutes in a solution of sodium bicarbonate, but not all of them, since those chemicals get dissolved in the waxy substance that covers the orange skin, and this substance doesn't come off easily.)What I do with honey instead of sugar: mix them thoroughly after slicing with enough money to cover every bit of their surface, and then some, in a wide bowl. I then place the bowl in a well ventilated place for a few weeks, covered with a sieve or with some gauze, to keep insects away. I mix maybe once or twice a day - honey will run off in the beginning, until the orange peel dries some and starts to absorb the honey. If the slices start to look dry, I add some more honey.Provided the orange peel is constantly re-covered in honey, it won't mold - honey is extremely sweet and prevents the formation of mold. During the few weeks they stay in honey the orange peel slices loose water and absorb honey. This way, they keep their tarty, acidic taste better than if cooked, in my opinion - they also stay chewier than if boiled. After they're well soaked in honey, and a tiny little bit dried out, I dip them in molten dark chocolate - quality high cocoa content chocolate, that is. To my taste, honey, cocoa and orange zest combined make a wonderful desert. Being a tiny bit chewier than boiled ones also helps with not gulping up all that you make in one go.

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    • Quickest Possible Desert: Avocado Cream
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  • 120v Metal Foundry With Lid Switch

    How hard do you think it would be to build something like this able to reach 1400 C, maybe slightly more? My thinking: you should be able to get quite close to this to fire high fire stoneware, and if you do, with controlled temperature this would yield a highly versatile kiln, able to both melt a wide variety of metals and fire a wide variety of ceramics.

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  • Chignon-style Pumpkin Croissant

    Thanks. I feared that filling them incompletely cooled might do something to the dough (like soaking it until it becomes mush, for example).

    About how cool should the baked croissants be before you start filling them?

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  • How to Make an Oil Candle From a Tile or Rock

    You can build a tiny dam/wall from putty around the place where you need to drill the hole in the tile, and fill its inside with water. IME it provides better cooling than spraying. Since it only has to last for a minute or so, sawdust with glue or wheat dough are good enough for putty. If you have kids and they let you have it, take a piece of silly putty from them.

    Hammering on slate risks shattering it.

    You can leave it out without much loss. Ceramic won't burn anyway. It just looks nicer with that thing on.

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  • How to Build the Easiest Dining Room Chair Ever

    I'm not so sure. Chairs need to be very sturdy to last. People lean on two legs, jump up and let themselves fall on chairs, climb onto the seat with their feet, and all this puts significant stress on the joints.Pocket holes are notoriously weak, when not used for joints where they just need to pull the material together, rather than for withstanding bending, twisting or shearing. Wood expands differently along the grain (almost not at all) than across the grain (some wood - especially softwood - even 10%, depending on the variation of humidity). The seat being rigidly attached to the frame, without any wiggle place across the grain, is likely to get it moving after a few humid summers and dry winters.The traditional joining method for chair frames is mortise and tenon. That kind of joint…

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    I'm not so sure. Chairs need to be very sturdy to last. People lean on two legs, jump up and let themselves fall on chairs, climb onto the seat with their feet, and all this puts significant stress on the joints.Pocket holes are notoriously weak, when not used for joints where they just need to pull the material together, rather than for withstanding bending, twisting or shearing. Wood expands differently along the grain (almost not at all) than across the grain (some wood - especially softwood - even 10%, depending on the variation of humidity). The seat being rigidly attached to the frame, without any wiggle place across the grain, is likely to get it moving after a few humid summers and dry winters.The traditional joining method for chair frames is mortise and tenon. That kind of joint is more difficult to make, but a lot more rigid. To avoid the joints between the legs and the seat frame to become loose after many people will have tilted the chair backwards and leaned on the two back legs only for a long while, you can attach some steel cable connecting the the joints between the front legs and the stretchers and the joints between the back legs and the seat frame and tension them well. This should take care of the most stringent source of failure.

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  • Jet Propelled Radio Controlled Duck

    From the looks of it, it shouldn't be very complicated to replicate it in wood. If you then coat it in fiber glass cloth and epoxy, the way wooden boats are coated, it should do the job quite well. Since the load it has to carry is very low, the wood can be the thinnest marine plywood you can find.

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  • DIY Grill Hack: Build a Platform for Your Grill

    You can mix and pour concrete using a trowel and a bucket, without even boards to build a frame, if you really need to. I use both wood and concrete, and can tell from experience that for this particular application both are equally easy to do. Wood is faster and lighter, but not more durable, for this particular application, IMO.

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  • DIY Concrete Stepping Stones That Look Natural

    Without some reinforcement, there's a high risk of cracks. You don't need mesh or rebar, there are small pieces of bent steel wire available which you simply mix into the concrete before pouring.A masonry trowel, additional to the smoothing trowel you used, would have been useful - it works better than hands for spreading and moving concrete when pouring.But visually I like the result.

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  • FlorinJ commented on RobBest's instructable Cat Repellent
    Cat Repellent

    I'd just let the dog roam the yard.

    You don't need any kind of IC, not even a microcontroller, to build a variable frequency and amplitude oscillator. Two transistors are all that's needed, one for the actual oscillator and one for the amplification. (That's how I built a device to train myself in Morse, some 40 years ago.)Plus, generating a square signal is bound to generate harmonics, most of them of frequencies that cats can no longer hear. That's wasted energy. Transistor-based oscillators generate something much closer to a sinus - hence less energy spent outside the cat-audible spectrum.Combine that with a cheap photo cell and accumulator scavenged from a garden light and you have a device that will last as long as the charger and battery do and will be completely autonomous.

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  • Kiridashi Inspired Marking Knife

    A while back, I did something similar -quite similar, and for the same purpose - marking on wood (and, as it has turned out since then, also useful for leather).Mine is made of an old file, which I didn't soften at the beginning, since I don't have where to re-harden it. It took many hours of drudgery to get rid of the file texture on a belt sander :-)I sharpened it at both ends in different directions, so I can cut/scratch/mark both left and right-handed.

    I thought of a diamond-shaped tip too. But the more I thought about it, the more I felt that it's not the same thing - it'd be a completely changed geometry, when marking - you can no longer see that precisely where the tip is and you need to tilt the knife a lot if you want one edge to be perpendicular to the material. Hence the two sharpened ends. Plus, the different geometry also would make sharpening more difficult, IMO. This way, there's also higher certainty of the result if you drop it on your foot ... :-D

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  • FlorinJ commented on Woodbrew's instructable Homemade Drum Sander
    Homemade Drum Sander

    Did you verify the parallelism between the table and the drum? Doesn't the table tilt sideways, with the support used for changing the material thickness only placed in the center and different sandpapers placed on each half of the drum, i.e. pieces being pushed through sideways too?

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  • FlorinJ commented on Jadem52's instructable Pocket Sized Pottery Wheel
    Pocket Sized Pottery Wheel

    Where do you fire it? With DIY pottery, this is what I find to be the biggest problems. It's not easy to reach the temperatures required for firing clay.

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  • Super Easy Clear Adhesive Lamp Shade

    Provided you use LED bulbs - which most people in Europe do anyway, simply because it's cheaper in the long run - temperatures don't get high enough to ignite anything.

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  • Levitating Side Table Made From Old Cardboard Boxes

    Good quality fishing line does not stretch.

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  • You Can Use a Drill Bit for More Than Drilling Holes!

    Possibly the wire you find where you live is a different allow from what I can get where I live. I found that no matter how I treat it, it still stays soft. Possibly too little carbon and other alloy elements in it.

    Fasten an old drill bit into an electric drill, give it a sharp tip on a belt sander or a stationary grinder, while the electric drill is running - this will make it easy to keep its shape round and the tip centered. Turn a handle from some scrap wood, cut off a small piece of copper tube to use as a ferrule, dig a few deeper scratches into the base of the drill bit, with an angle grinder, fixate the drill into the handle with a few drops of epoxy, and you have a very sturdy, very cheap, very long lasting awl.Sharpen the tip of a thicker drill bit to a wider angle/a more blunt shape, also fastened into an electric drill, and you get a decent center punch.Only, while grinding a drill, take care to dip it into water frequently, to keep it cool. You risk softening it otherwise.

    Where do you get your wire? Regular wire is too soft/not springy, IME.

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  • PiNAS - the Raspberry Pi NAS

    You may want to get a small cheap third disc into the rack. I use a raspi for media center, and a SD card gets damaged after a couple of months of usage (last one I used lasted half a year or so). I don't think you can get it anymore, but there was a funny little PI disk from WD available for a while. (It was featured on the raspi blog: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/meet-314gb-pidrive/) Something like that disk is what I mean. Put the OS on such a disk, and the SD card will last much longer.

    I haven't looked into the particulars of the Pi 2 or 3 or 4. The problem with the first generation was that the same controller handled all IO, for both USB and ethernet. If that design was kept (which, again, I have no idea if it was or wasn't), an upgrade go a more recent generation probably won't help much.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Matlek's instructable Unclog Senseo Pod Holders
    Unclog Senseo Pod Holders

    I suppose it works even better if you add a few drops of vinegar to the water.

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  • How to Make a Realistic Faux Neon Sign - Super Bright!

    Didn't try this particular ible myself , and chances that I will are slim - not that much of a fan of neon signs. But I had somewhat of a similar problem recently - getting aquarium tube to stick to a surface of soft smooth plastic.What I did was to create holes/indentations in the surface into which the hot glue, once solidified, has a mechanical grip, and make a bridge over the tube. Event if the glue does not adhere to the surface itself, it creates sort of an anchor/brace that holds the tube in place.Given the nature of this project, I think it would be simpler to use particle board that has a melamine coating on the show side. Hot glue sticks to the rough surface of particle board extremely well.

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  • Simple Sheet Metal Brake: No Welding

    Put a drop of oil on the hacksaw blade, and repeatedly put a drop of oil onto drill bits, when drilling metal. It will make things a lot easier for you and save you some money on drill bits and hacksaw blades which wear too quickly.

    If you build it wider, use angle iron with wider sides. Otherwise the brake itself will bend.

    If you add a hinge in the middle, you break the width - can't stick wide stock into the brake anymore. Which defeats the purpose for making it wider.

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  • Drill Press Conversion to Brushless Setup

    Use lubricant/coolant when drilling metal. Without, you just burn through drill bits unnecessarily. Use low speed when drilling metal - the larger the hole, the lower the speed needs to be. Otherwise, most energy is spent on heating by friction, instead of cutting through the metal.

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  • How to Make  Pretzels in Four Easy Steps

    Call me any way you like, I don't mind. But I think the term you actually wanted to use was "pedantic". Snob means something else.I'm a programmer by trade, and in my line of business a misplaced dot or semicolon in code can mean days of searching for the source of a problem. That's probably why I'm more bent on precision of expression than most people.But I don't think it's any different with natural language either. Use "traditional" repeatedly for something that's not, and the term will loose its value. Use language in general without precision, and people will start no longer taking what you say seriously, because experience will have taught them you don't always mean what you say - not as an ill-intentioned lie, just out of lack of precision.

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  • Indonesian Bakso (Beef Surimi Meatballs)

    Lamb and mutton, at least, get their specific flavor/smell from the unsaturated fat that quickly starts to oxidize, after the animal is slaughtered, I was taught by a friend who's deeper into cooking than I am. The same friend told me you can in effect almost completely stop this process using rosemary - put the meat and some marinade rich in rosemary leafs in a sealed plastic bag for a few hours into the fridge, and the specific smell that many people don't like will have vanished. I usually harvest some leaves from my rosemary bush, let them become bone dry, then grind them with a coffee grinder and store them in an airtight jar.The jar keeps the flavor, the grind ensures a large contact surface between the spice and the meat, to transfer the substances which inhibit oxidation.

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  • How to Make Bavarian Pretzels in Four Easy Steps

    You'd need to switch to fresh yeast for that title to be right.Lye isn't that dangerous, if used at the low concentration required for Brezn (5%, iirc). Even if you get it all over your hands, you only get a rash, worst case, not a real burn.

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  • World's Simplest and Newest Trebuchet (Walking Arm Trebuchet)

    Don't fill the racquetball with water. The water will flow in all kinds of crazy patterns and consume from the ball's energy. Fill it with something solid, and make sure that either the ball is full or the solid is evenly spread inside the ball, so the center of mass and the center of pressure are approximately in the same spot. This should add several yards to how far the ball travels.Heated grease would be an option, I think. Lighter than water, so you can fill more of the empty volume, and if you fill it while it's hot, you can still use a syringe, but if you roll the ball on a cold surface for a while after filling, it should solidify as a layer of approximately uniform thickness inside the ball.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Natalina's instructable Build a Soundproof Wall
    Build a Soundproof Wall

    Foam is light. It will not properly keep noise out.Fiberglass is somewhat heavier, but still pretty light.Heavy rubber mat, or dry sand would work greatly.

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  • Spicy Chicken Wings, Baked and Gluten Free

    :-DThere's probably a reason why I rarely eat out, since several years ago. When I do, I pick a place with excellent service and food, and usually not at all that cheap.I absolutely love garlic. To the extent that friends call me an addict. And hoppy beer - the kind where hops is added towards the end of the boiling, giving less bitterness and more flavor.Here's something you can whip up in no time, which garlic addicts will appreciate: steam a head of cauliflower until it's still a tiny little bit crunchy, mash it, mix it with a pinch of salt, 1-2-3-4 crushed garlic cloves (depending on the garlic tolerance of the eaters - for whatever reason, garlic's heat is heavily amplified by the mixture), and olive oil just enough to make it creamy. Someone (who was also half of a garlic addict) on…

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    :-DThere's probably a reason why I rarely eat out, since several years ago. When I do, I pick a place with excellent service and food, and usually not at all that cheap.I absolutely love garlic. To the extent that friends call me an addict. And hoppy beer - the kind where hops is added towards the end of the boiling, giving less bitterness and more flavor.Here's something you can whip up in no time, which garlic addicts will appreciate: steam a head of cauliflower until it's still a tiny little bit crunchy, mash it, mix it with a pinch of salt, 1-2-3-4 crushed garlic cloves (depending on the garlic tolerance of the eaters - for whatever reason, garlic's heat is heavily amplified by the mixture), and olive oil just enough to make it creamy. Someone (who was also half of a garlic addict) once said it's like chocolate: once you start eating it you can't stop.

    Makes no sense flavor-wise. Why would you use dried garlic and onion, from which mostly everything flavored is gone, instead of using them fresh? And why would you use a store-bought sauce when it's so easy to make your own, without added preservatives, color, flavor enhancers, thickeners and whatnot? Except for hot, all you can taste in most store-bought sauces is salt. Even the heat is nasty, odorless and tasteless, unlike that of fresh hot chili, which can have a wide range of flavors and go in all kinds of taste directions, from buttery to spicy to fruity.I usually don't either bake or deep fry chicken wings. I grill them on an open grill, on rather low heat - the smoke adds to the flavor. Before grilling, I don't coat them with anything starchy, I just rub them with a mix of sweet pa…

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    Makes no sense flavor-wise. Why would you use dried garlic and onion, from which mostly everything flavored is gone, instead of using them fresh? And why would you use a store-bought sauce when it's so easy to make your own, without added preservatives, color, flavor enhancers, thickeners and whatnot? Except for hot, all you can taste in most store-bought sauces is salt. Even the heat is nasty, odorless and tasteless, unlike that of fresh hot chili, which can have a wide range of flavors and go in all kinds of taste directions, from buttery to spicy to fruity.I usually don't either bake or deep fry chicken wings. I grill them on an open grill, on rather low heat - the smoke adds to the flavor. Before grilling, I don't coat them with anything starchy, I just rub them with a mix of sweet paprika, ground white pepper, some crushed garlic and thyme, and let them sit for at least a few hours in the fridge, in an airtight container. The sauce I make using a mix of dried hot chili flakes and sweet paprika, depending on how hot I want it/I can afford to serve to others, a tiny amount of crushed garlic, again, only if the other people at the table won't complain, a lot of chopped parsley, and olive oil just enough to make it bind. Most people will probably want some salt added to the sauce - I use very little salt when cooking. When I grill, I always add salt to the meat only at the end - a little salt, when not grilling the meat excessively, dehydrates it, enhancing flavor, but you can achieve a similar effect by grilling just a tiny little bit longer (a minute or so, not more, or the meat will loose its tenderness). Plus, on an open, lid-less grill, meat looses water much more efficiently than in a smoker or a closed grill. With salt on the meat from the beginning, there's a higher risk of over-grilling and making the meat chewy, IMO.

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  • FlorinJ followed attosa
      • Double Rainbow Lollipops
      • Popcorn Kernel Jar Diversion Safe
      • French Macaron Ornaments
  • Either wider sided angle iron or two or three pieces of angle iron of different width of the sides placed one into the other and screwed together. With three pieces screwed together with 1/4" screws every 2", placed at an offset of 1" on the sides, I think you'd get excellent rigidity. But it would be a lot of drilling and filing and screwing.

    You need a foldable workbench and an angle grinder. The more so if you like to work with metal.Not that difficult to build either. Two collapsible sawhorses that can be locked into working position with screws, so they have good rigidity, with a working surface that also gets screwed in. When folded, you can store everything under the bed.

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  • It lays flat on the ground and doesn't have anything on top that should make it act like a 3D structure. It will behave like a foil - very tough foil, but still a foil, that will be eventually torn apart by the ground moving underneath with seasonal temperature changes.

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  • Personally, I would have gone for a system with several cameras and a battery of tear gas sprays.

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  • The bar gauge reminded me of another simple jig you could print: a tool to draw a center line on a slat of arbitrary width. Simply a piece with two protruding pins at the ends, which you can slide on the sides of the slat, one on each edge, and a hole to put a pencil in in the middle.If you place the tool on a slat, then rotate it so that the pins touch the edges, then move the it along the slat so that the pins stay in contact with the edges at all times, the trace left by the pencil will be right in the middle of the slat.

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  • FlorinJ commented on katel73's instructable DIY Concrete Necklace

    If you place something vibrating (like an orbital sander or, even better, a jigsaw) on the table next to the form into which you poured the concrete, and leave it on for maybe ten minutes or so after pouring, the vibrations will get the air bubbles out of the concrete, resulting in a smoother looking and also harder concrete. Also, you shouldn't add water until the concrete becomes runny. The chemical reactions inside the concrete won't consume all the water, if you add too much of it. The unconsumed water will dry out eventually, leaving microscopic holes behind, which make the concrete softer than it should be.The lower toughness, caused by either trapped air bubbles or too much water, is not so much of a problem for a necklace. But the resulting microscopic surface pores will accumulat…

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    If you place something vibrating (like an orbital sander or, even better, a jigsaw) on the table next to the form into which you poured the concrete, and leave it on for maybe ten minutes or so after pouring, the vibrations will get the air bubbles out of the concrete, resulting in a smoother looking and also harder concrete. Also, you shouldn't add water until the concrete becomes runny. The chemical reactions inside the concrete won't consume all the water, if you add too much of it. The unconsumed water will dry out eventually, leaving microscopic holes behind, which make the concrete softer than it should be.The lower toughness, caused by either trapped air bubbles or too much water, is not so much of a problem for a necklace. But the resulting microscopic surface pores will accumulate stain and grease, over time. Not nice, IMO.You can also mix pigment into the concrete, before pouring, if you want more colors than just grey. If you're after one particular color, it's best to search for and use white cement, instead of the regular grey one.If you have the patience, you can also polish and then buff concrete to a glass-like smoothness. You can also embed pieces of colored glass, when pouring, then polish and buff. This can create quite interesting patterns. Or you can try out acid staining, after polishing, followed by buffing and waxing, to give it a look much like jade or colored marble. Concrete is a much more versatile material than you'd believe by looking at the many dull, grey surfaces that you usually see.

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  • I apologize in advance. I don't want to put you down. I'm sure the mallet as it was built will last for years, and do its job perfectly. But others might read this ible too, and it might be useful to them to avoid a few things which I think were less than ideal in how you built this mallet.Usually, you cut the hole for the handle tapered, so that the head cannot slide off the handle at the end opposite to where you're holding the mallet, and don't glue the handle in. In time, both the handle contracts and the hole in the head expands, as the wood dries out and settles, and you can hammer the handle in some more. Which is also why you don't cut off the tip right away, but let at least half an inch or so stick out for at least a few months, maybe a year. Only then do you cut off the tip of …

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    I apologize in advance. I don't want to put you down. I'm sure the mallet as it was built will last for years, and do its job perfectly. But others might read this ible too, and it might be useful to them to avoid a few things which I think were less than ideal in how you built this mallet.Usually, you cut the hole for the handle tapered, so that the head cannot slide off the handle at the end opposite to where you're holding the mallet, and don't glue the handle in. In time, both the handle contracts and the hole in the head expands, as the wood dries out and settles, and you can hammer the handle in some more. Which is also why you don't cut off the tip right away, but let at least half an inch or so stick out for at least a few months, maybe a year. Only then do you cut off the tip of the handle.Glue is indeed stronger than wood, especially wood across the grain vs glue applied along the grain. Which means that once glued in, the handle will stay fixed to the head, even when the hole becomes bigger than the handle, potentially causing it to crack. Don't be scared if this happens - just drive a wedge in. This will fasten the handle into the head for good, glue or no glue. The settling and compressing that happens for a while after building the mallet is also why driving dowels through is not a very good idea. For the aspect alone, you could have used short plugs instead of dowels driven through the whole head.

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  • I watched that one too :-) You are right, there is a tiny bit more detail on painting there. I meant more of a generic painting tutorial. But I'll see what I can do starting from there.What kind of paint did you use? Any advice on brushes?

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  • Can you maybe write a tutorial about painting? I'm pretty sure I can do the cutting and gluing, but I was never good at drawing, and it's not just plain painting what you do - plain painting, like walls or furniture, that I can do.

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