author2
6Instructables115,150Views13CommentsJoined July 30th, 2014

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Concrete and Casting Contest
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Concrete and Casting Contest
Show 1 More »
  • Improvised Anvils

    The answer depends a lot on a few details. I’ve run coal forges more than propane, but I have actually warmed up to them recently. They’re what most professional blacksmiths use, for good reason. If this is somthing you’re planning on continuing long term, I’d recommend getting comfortable with a gas forge. There are some downsides though: you’re limited by whatever the size of your chamber is, and building them well takes some know how, and can be expensive. And if not built well, they aren’t going to heat your metal very efficiently, and can potentially be quite dangerous. Another thing to consider is fule availability. Propane is fairly ubiquitous, but it can get very expensive if you’re exchanging grill-size cylinders for $25 a pop. Coal on the other hand, is cheap, if you can buy i...

    see more »

    The answer depends a lot on a few details. I’ve run coal forges more than propane, but I have actually warmed up to them recently. They’re what most professional blacksmiths use, for good reason. If this is somthing you’re planning on continuing long term, I’d recommend getting comfortable with a gas forge. There are some downsides though: you’re limited by whatever the size of your chamber is, and building them well takes some know how, and can be expensive. And if not built well, they aren’t going to heat your metal very efficiently, and can potentially be quite dangerous. Another thing to consider is fule availability. Propane is fairly ubiquitous, but it can get very expensive if you’re exchanging grill-size cylinders for $25 a pop. Coal on the other hand, is cheap, if you can buy it in person, but it can be hard to find a good supply. Building a coal forge is cheap and easy, and no more dangerous than a bonfire. All that taken together, my advice would be to start with a coal forge, provided you can find fule for it, and use that until you get a feel for the kind of work you tend to do. Then eventually, after doing plenty of research, and ideally trying out and examining other people’s gas forges, make one that will work well for your typical project. I hope that helps, a good for you for starting young! What are you using for an anvil?

    View Instructable »
  • How to Make a Huge Fabulous Mega Anvil

    It's held up quite nicely, especially on the front half, where i faced it with spring steel. The mild steel portion has gotten a bit beaten up, but that was to be expected. The bigger problem has been the rebound, which has deteriorated somewhat. I suspect the anchoring legs have started to work themselves loose from the surrounding concrete. I've actually restored a nice old 120 pounder since then, that I now use as my main anvil. nowadays, I use the big one more as a swage block, or when I'm working with strikers.

    View Instructable »
  • Blacksmiths Vice

    Well, i know it seems like a good idea, but that "do as I say, not as I do" disclaimer near the beginning was partially because i did just that, and it broke. The spring steel arm snapped clean off; took some pretty beefy welding to stick it back together.For something that is going to take as intense a beating as a vice, chunky and ductile is the way to go.

    View Instructable »