author
3Instructables7,627Views12CommentsVancouver, WaJoined January 30th, 2015
I love scrapping and dissecting electronics and taking out the guts to see all the goodies inside. I think everyone should take something apart with no idea on how or intention to put it back together!
  • NickB6 commented on NickB6's instructable DIY 4S Lithium Battery Pack With BMS7 months ago
    DIY 4S Lithium Battery Pack With BMS

    Hi! You could use an external power supply to charge the battery through the BMS, but that's not ideal if you want your batteries to live a long life. The BMS is limited by the tolerances built into the protection IC, and it doesn't do a great job monitoring individual cells, which may result in overcharging the series cells before it reaches the cutoff voltage (16.8 volts for 4S). Some cells charge to 4.2, and others to 4.25 to even 4.3 volts before the cutoff is reached. That's not good and reduces lifespan and capacity. This is what the balance plug is for. The balancr charger limits and monitors current and voltage and is calibrated to closer tolerances than the actual BMS. I tested my BMS during charging and after with my multimeter and under load, and it indeed does pull the plug ...

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    Hi! You could use an external power supply to charge the battery through the BMS, but that's not ideal if you want your batteries to live a long life. The BMS is limited by the tolerances built into the protection IC, and it doesn't do a great job monitoring individual cells, which may result in overcharging the series cells before it reaches the cutoff voltage (16.8 volts for 4S). Some cells charge to 4.2, and others to 4.25 to even 4.3 volts before the cutoff is reached. That's not good and reduces lifespan and capacity. This is what the balance plug is for. The balancr charger limits and monitors current and voltage and is calibrated to closer tolerances than the actual BMS. I tested my BMS during charging and after with my multimeter and under load, and it indeed does pull the plug when anything is exceeded, but you need a charger to get the most out of it. Thanks hope that helps!

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  • NickB6 commented on NickB6's instructable Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries7 months ago
    Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Banesync, thanks for the suggestions! I added it to the write-up. I had forgotten that you can short out on the metal can of the battery if touching the positive or negative terminals.

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  • NickB6's instructable Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries's weekly stats: 7 months ago
    • Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries
      412 views
      18 favorites
      2 comments
  • NickB6 commented on NickB6's instructable Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries7 months ago
    Recovering Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Glad you liked it. Great suggestion. I had planned on it, but never got around to it until today so thanks for reminding me!

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  • NickB6's instructable DIY 4S Lithium Battery Pack With BMS's weekly stats: 9 months ago
    • DIY 4S Lithium Battery Pack With BMS
      154 views
      2 favorites
      1 comments
  • NickB6 made the instructable How to Build an LED Planetarium10 months ago
    How to Build an LED Planetarium

    Thanks for replying. I have some pictures to show you what happened! The light is square, and has 4 distinct 'hot spots' in the light projection. I believe these are the individual 1 watt LED's in the matrix, even though looking at it, you wouldn't see them. I first tried this with a 10 watt high power LED, and it was a disaster because the light on the ceiling was not only square, but square and full of 9 bright dots. I switched to the 5 watt button LED and still have the issue. I think I will go with a single 1 watt button LED or a 3 watt Did you have this problem with the 3 watt LED? Were there 3 hot spots in the projection? I like to get the light as bright as I can without killing the LED. I drove this 5W one at 7 volts and almost 1000 mA and it gets crazy hot in seconds if not coo...

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    Thanks for replying. I have some pictures to show you what happened! The light is square, and has 4 distinct 'hot spots' in the light projection. I believe these are the individual 1 watt LED's in the matrix, even though looking at it, you wouldn't see them. I first tried this with a 10 watt high power LED, and it was a disaster because the light on the ceiling was not only square, but square and full of 9 bright dots. I switched to the 5 watt button LED and still have the issue. I think I will go with a single 1 watt button LED or a 3 watt Did you have this problem with the 3 watt LED? Were there 3 hot spots in the projection? I like to get the light as bright as I can without killing the LED. I drove this 5W one at 7 volts and almost 1000 mA and it gets crazy hot in seconds if not cooled. I stuck it on an old PC heatsink with fan to keep it cool and it works awesome. I'm really happy with this project. Great idea! I hope to fix the LED issue soon! Thanks for sharing this with us and I appreciate your feedback!

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  • NickB6 commented on mattthegamer463's instructable How to Build an LED Planetarium10 months ago
    How to Build an LED Planetarium

    I followed your example and built this. I used an 8 quart stainless bowl from Ikea, a cookie tin for the base, and got some tiny drill bits and drilled hundreds of holes for stars and constellations. I used .5mm bits, and only broke 3 drilling the holes. I used my Dremel tool and cooling oil to keep the bits alive. I enlarged some of the holes with .8mm and 1mm bits as well. I ended up using a switch mode power supply/brick from a PC monitor and a DC-DC constant current, constant voltage driver. I tried a 5W LED, ran it at 11 volts and 1100 mA attached to a fan-cooled heatsink to keep the LED alive. It came out nice, except the LED emitter was square even though it seems the LED has segments of individual LED's on the emitter that I only saw when the light projected through the holes. D...

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    I followed your example and built this. I used an 8 quart stainless bowl from Ikea, a cookie tin for the base, and got some tiny drill bits and drilled hundreds of holes for stars and constellations. I used .5mm bits, and only broke 3 drilling the holes. I used my Dremel tool and cooling oil to keep the bits alive. I enlarged some of the holes with .8mm and 1mm bits as well. I ended up using a switch mode power supply/brick from a PC monitor and a DC-DC constant current, constant voltage driver. I tried a 5W LED, ran it at 11 volts and 1100 mA attached to a fan-cooled heatsink to keep the LED alive. It came out nice, except the LED emitter was square even though it seems the LED has segments of individual LED's on the emitter that I only saw when the light projected through the holes. Did you have issues like that with the 3W LED? I'm thinking of downgrading to a lower-power LED like 1W or 3W to see if it gets rid of the strange light shape. I will post pictures when I can. Thanks for the great idea!

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  • NickB6 commented on Barry_L's instructable Simple 10w Bluetooth Portable Speaker 11 months ago
    Simple 10w Bluetooth Portable Speaker

    I was using the wrong capacitor. You need a large size one rated for at minimum 1000uf. Bigger is better. It was too small even though rated at 1000uf and 16v. I salvaged a larger (about 3 times larger) 10v 1000uf from an old power supply and it works fine, but I'm going to swap it out for a 1600uf or maybe a 2500uf I took off an old motherboard. If yours isn't turning on, you may have it wired wrong. The switch goes between the battery and step up board. I broke the circuit connection at the board, not battery. Follow his wiring diagram. It worked for me.

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  • NickB6 commented on Barry_L's instructable Simple 10w Bluetooth Portable Speaker 1 year ago
    Simple 10w Bluetooth Portable Speaker

    Very nice! I got all the parts together from China after a month and put the circuit together. I'm having some issues though. I was using a 10v 1000mf capacitor. It works fine without the capacitor (just can't turn up the volume without it shutting off) but as soon as I connect the cap to the step up board the voltage output goes from 6.5 to 1.2 and keeps falling until it's down to .5v the battery is still outputting 4.1v but at the output of the charging board it's the same as the output at the step up board. What's going on here? I'm lost. Any help is appreciated!

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  • NickB6 commented on bwayne64's instructable 27 Led Light Mod2 years ago
    27 Led Light Mod

    To get them free, you need to buy something at HC. It can be anything. I have several of these and the little black flashlights lying around that I got free. They work great. I buy small cheap stuff like a $1 set of utility knives or 50 cent box cutter and they give you the light free with the coupon.

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  • NickB6 commented on Mrballeng's instructable Make a ring by melting pennies. 2 years ago
    Make a ring by melting pennies.

    Galvanized steel is coated with mostly zinc and tin, and every welder knows that welding galvanized metal releases zinc oxide fumes and other nasty stuff that makes you sick and can kill you you in short order without proper safety gear or a fume extractor/ventilation. "Welders fever" is real. I have heard of that milk trick before but don't know if it works. Wear a respirator made for metal fumes!

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