author
365Instructables16,466,398Views5,253CommentsKnoxville, TennesseeJoined July 17th, 2008
I miss the days when magazines like Popular Mechanics had all sorts of DIY projects for making and repairing just about everything. I am enjoying posting things I have learned and done since I got my first tools. I enjoy studying the Bible and retired after 40 years as a Lutheran pastor. I like to dabble with some electronics projects. I have a wood lathe and a metal lathe, a radial arm saw, a router, and both a 220 volt stick welder and a gas shielded wire feed welder. I appreciate In... Read More »

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Make It Move Contest 2017
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Make It Move Contest 2017
Fix & Repair Contest
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MacGyver Challenge
Contest Winner Runner Up in the MacGyver Challenge
Metal Contest 2016
Contest Winner First Prize in the Metal Contest 2016
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  • Phil B commented on gasperi's instructable Make a Simple Paper Slide Rule12 days ago
    Make a Simple Paper Slide Rule

    A widow gave me her husband’s K & E engineering slide rule. It has some discolorations because it was kept in the case for many years, and the metal frame around the cursor glasses had corroded away. Discussions on good slide rules say the case is not friendly to a good slide rule over time.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's forum topic Finding a very special screw13 days ago

    I can remember a time before our hardware stores had screws in metric. Of course, there were very few items using metric screws at that time, too. There have been faint attempts to shift to metric standards, but a man who taught machine tool usage said it will never happen because there is not enough tool steel to make the switch. About 1980 US produced automobiles began including metric thread fasteners on the car. But, it is also not unusual to find some fasteners are metric and some are English on the same machine. We simply proceed with caution and do not force anything. About ten years ago a friend brought an old shotgun to me. He had just bought it, but the screw retaining the fore stock under the barrel was badly damaged and would not seat fully. A gunsmith had looked at it and t...

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    I can remember a time before our hardware stores had screws in metric. Of course, there were very few items using metric screws at that time, too. There have been faint attempts to shift to metric standards, but a man who taught machine tool usage said it will never happen because there is not enough tool steel to make the switch. About 1980 US produced automobiles began including metric thread fasteners on the car. But, it is also not unusual to find some fasteners are metric and some are English on the same machine. We simply proceed with caution and do not force anything. About ten years ago a friend brought an old shotgun to me. He had just bought it, but the screw retaining the fore stock under the barrel was badly damaged and would not seat fully. A gunsmith had looked at it and told him the thread size was nothing he had ever seen. Finally, I gently turned it inward as far as it would go and tapped the head toward the center of the hole with a hammer. Then it turned inward freely another quarter of a turn. I kept doing that until it appeared undamaged and seated fully. I did do an Instructable about it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Refill Your Fountain Pen Cartridges and Save13 days ago
    Refill Your Fountain Pen Cartridges and Save

    The hard part is continual vigilance against spatters. I usually squeeze ink from the syringe or eye dropper until a bubble of ink appears over the cartridge opening. Then I retract air until the bubble disappears. I inject more ink into the cartridge until another bubble forms. The cartridge does fill with ink. Hold a tissue loosely around the cartridge to catch spatter droplets, too. Do your cartridge filling in or over a laundry sink. Do not wear your best clothing whioe filing cartridges.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's forum topic Finding a very special screw13 days ago

    I am in the United States of America. We do have one large electronics seller with stores across the nation and it accepts old electronic items of all kinds for recycling, regardless of who originally sold the device. I stopped at one of their stores today and asked about screws. They were very helpful, but did not have any M3 x 0.5 screws stripped from anything. We do have the added problem that most screws we see are English sizes, even though many items for sale in our stores are imports from countries where metric sizes are the standard. Thank you for your comment.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's forum topic Finding a very special screw15 days ago

    I have saved screws and such over the years, but mine are English sizes. I have not stripped screws from anything metric. Thank you.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's forum topic Finding a very special screw16 days ago

    You are a wise man. I do not have old items to strip of their screws and other useful parts. I did consider contacting places that do computer servicing, but it was easier to borrow a screw for the next couole of weeks.

    Thank you. 50 years goes more quickly than one expects. Thank you for looking and commenting. We have a store in town that specializes in only fasteners. When they had nothing in 3mm, I was not sure what I would do. A number 4-40 screw turned in 1.5 turns. That might have worked if no one even breathed on the cross and its base.

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  • Phil B's instructable Make a Safety Razor's weekly stats: 18 days ago
    • Make a Safety Razor
      296 views
      1 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter19 days ago
    EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter

    Correction: the Harbor Freight meter does not have capacitance.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter19 days ago
    EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter

    I suppose much depends on your requirements. Do you need something with the quality of a FLUKE? My needs are rather simple and lately. I have been using the little $15 meters from Harbor Freight. Often there has been a coupon in the Sunday paper that gives you one free with a purchase, although those coupons are more infrequent lately. (I am assuming you are in the USA.) Those little Harbor Freight meters have AC and DC voltage, Ohms, current up to 10 Amps., diode check, capacitance, 1.5 and 9 volt battery check, and a transistor tester. Often all I need is to know if voltage in an approximate range is present, if a diode conducts in one direction but not in the other, and the value of a resistor within a normal percentage range of error. I have sometimes gotten a more accurate reading ...

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    I suppose much depends on your requirements. Do you need something with the quality of a FLUKE? My needs are rather simple and lately. I have been using the little $15 meters from Harbor Freight. Often there has been a coupon in the Sunday paper that gives you one free with a purchase, although those coupons are more infrequent lately. (I am assuming you are in the USA.) Those little Harbor Freight meters have AC and DC voltage, Ohms, current up to 10 Amps., diode check, capacitance, 1.5 and 9 volt battery check, and a transistor tester. Often all I need is to know if voltage in an approximate range is present, if a diode conducts in one direction but not in the other, and the value of a resistor within a normal percentage range of error. I have sometimes gotten a more accurate reading from one of these little meters than from my more expensive Radio Shack meter. But, there is no continuity chime. I do not know what the input impedance is, which becomes important for some checks so the readings are not skewed by the meter circuitry, itself, becoming part of the test.There were more options before Radio Shack went out of business. Still, thee should be some good choices on-line. Like the little Harbor Freight meter, I expect most of what you find will have been made in the Pacific Rim.

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  • Phil B's instructable Weed Trimmer Handlebar's weekly stats: 20 days ago
    • Weed Trimmer Handlebar
      301 views
      2 favorites
      2 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Crazy Good Sleep22 days ago
    Crazy Good Sleep

    I wrote to the people at earthinginstitute (dot) net and asked about surplus electrons on the outer skin and metal parts of a commercial airplane. They indicated data they have to this point is not conclusive. In some videos on grounding Clint Ober speaks about using a meter to detect a voltage difference between his body and the earth. His meter may be a lot better than mine, but I have never been able to notice more than a very quick blip on the digital readout. At the same time, Ober’s book “Earthing” mentions an experiment with truckers. Random truckers at a truck stop were given a grounding pad on which to sit while driving. The pad was connected to metal in the truck cab. Those grounded this way reported some of the same benefits as someone connected to a grounded wire while sleep...

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    I wrote to the people at earthinginstitute (dot) net and asked about surplus electrons on the outer skin and metal parts of a commercial airplane. They indicated data they have to this point is not conclusive. In some videos on grounding Clint Ober speaks about using a meter to detect a voltage difference between his body and the earth. His meter may be a lot better than mine, but I have never been able to notice more than a very quick blip on the digital readout. At the same time, Ober’s book “Earthing” mentions an experiment with truckers. Random truckers at a truck stop were given a grounding pad on which to sit while driving. The pad was connected to metal in the truck cab. Those grounded this way reported some of the same benefits as someone connected to a grounded wire while sleeping, etc. My meager experience with electricity can understand that the large metal truck is a larger storage device for electrons than a human body and there could be an exchange to equalize electrical potential. But, it hardly seems like a true on going ground because of the rubber tires. Also, I have a hard time understanding how electrons can transfer between a mat and human skin when both are separated by a couple of layers of non-conductive cloth, unless someone is very sweaty.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Weed Trimmer Handlebar23 days ago
    Weed Trimmer Handlebar

    I apologize for the large photo file, but this iPad does not allow me to reduce it. If I were to make this handlebar again, I might make it a little wider, although it works well enough as it is. You may notice a wheel on the head. That is an edger attachment I made. I turn the boom a quarter of a turn to use it. I found it easier to leave it in place when not in use. Without the shoulder strap and handlebar I was always bending over just a little and my back felt strained after half of an hour of that. Our ground is too rough to let the head float on a wheel. The house in the background belongs to the neighbor.

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  • Phil B commented on dlewisa's instructable DIY Wood Molding on a Table Saw24 days ago
    DIY Wood Molding on a Table Saw

    I coveted a cutter head and a few basic cutters back in the early 1970s. I got a radial arm saw in 1972 and used these to make Roman Ogee molding for tops on our first bedroom furniture pieces. Antiquing was popular then, so I could use soft woods because the antiquing meant they got a coat of paint and the grain pattern did not matter. Before the radial arm saw I had a solid blade mount arbor for a wood lathe I had bought a dozen years before while in junior high. I made a plywood table to fit on the lathe so I could use the cutters to make molding. These cutters naturally were not carbide tipped, but ground. The peripheral speed was pretty good, but they still did not cut quite as well as a router. A router seemed like a luxury item not affordable. I had to be very careful to feed wor...

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    I coveted a cutter head and a few basic cutters back in the early 1970s. I got a radial arm saw in 1972 and used these to make Roman Ogee molding for tops on our first bedroom furniture pieces. Antiquing was popular then, so I could use soft woods because the antiquing meant they got a coat of paint and the grain pattern did not matter. Before the radial arm saw I had a solid blade mount arbor for a wood lathe I had bought a dozen years before while in junior high. I made a plywood table to fit on the lathe so I could use the cutters to make molding. These cutters naturally were not carbide tipped, but ground. The peripheral speed was pretty good, but they still did not cut quite as well as a router. A router seemed like a luxury item not affordable. I had to be very careful to feed work slowly at an even speed or there could be a scallop from uneven cutting. Chatter was also something to be avoided, if at all possible. Chatter was more of a problem on a radial arm saw than I think it would be on a table saw. That is because the cutter is likely above on the radial arm saw and the work can jump up into the cutters if not held down very well. Any warp or twist in the wood meant an uneven cut was likely. Although you could buy a guard, great care was needed to be certain fingers did not get into the path of the virtually invisible spinning blades. And, guards sometimes got in the way more than they protected. Whenever you bought a sawblade at Sears you got a small booklet with a complete list and drawings to show the profile of all cutters offered by Craftsman. Several examples of cut profiles were made with a combination of cuts from two or more cutters set very orecisely. The booklet was partly educational and partly a sales brochure to make you want to buy more cutters. It always seemed to me that those complex cuts could require some hand sanding to smooth faint lines where the cutters did not align exactly as intended.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Adding an Audiobook to an IPhone24 days ago
    Adding an Audiobook to an IPhone

    I confess I initially believed an audio book, like a Bible, would need to go through iTunes. That does get complicated. An audio book player app. is easier and works very well. Does your suggested software require the PC to be on in order for the audio book to be heard over the phone? That would not work for me.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems26 days ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Your list of engines should be very helpful to others in the future, as well as your link to parts. A few years ago we owned and used the 1989 vintage Ryan weed trimmer in my photos for this Instructable. After ten years I had air leak problems and replaced the gaskets. I did not even try to find a gasket set for that relatively unknown brand, but purchased a roll of gasket material at an auto parts store. Then I made my own gaskets. I did not use a ball peen hammer to cut them against the original parts as I once saw my father do with cast iron parts many years ago, but used an X-Acto knife and a small scissors. We used that machine for a dozen more years before we passed it on to someone else because we were moving and believed we would never again need a weed trimmer. (Last year I ha...

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    Your list of engines should be very helpful to others in the future, as well as your link to parts. A few years ago we owned and used the 1989 vintage Ryan weed trimmer in my photos for this Instructable. After ten years I had air leak problems and replaced the gaskets. I did not even try to find a gasket set for that relatively unknown brand, but purchased a roll of gasket material at an auto parts store. Then I made my own gaskets. I did not use a ball peen hammer to cut them against the original parts as I once saw my father do with cast iron parts many years ago, but used an X-Acto knife and a small scissors. We used that machine for a dozen more years before we passed it on to someone else because we were moving and believed we would never again need a weed trimmer. (Last year I had to go out and buy a new weed trimmer because we moved again and now need a weed trimmer again.) Thank you for the report. I think you will be pleased at the difference new gaskets make.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems27 days ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Your cultivator looks like a weed trimmer engine mounted on a cultivator frame. I have a weed trimmer about the same size, and it can be started with an electric drill motor, but the electric motor must be a specified minimum speed and horsepower or the cultivator engine does not turn fast enough to start. I do not think your carburetor has a float, but is a diaphragm type. Still, it would be good to know fuel is flowing freely through the fuel line up to the carburetor. You also want to be certain there are no air leaks in the gaskets between the engine halves or between the carburetor and the engine. Are the high and low idle jets properly set and free of dirt in the seats of the jets?Does the engine start briefly when you spray ether starting fluid into the air intake?

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems4 weeks ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    It sounds like a fuel system problem. I found an owner’s manual for a 900 Watt Pulsar generator at the Lowe’s web page. Did you open the air vent switch on the fuel cap before starting? Air must be able to get back into the gas tank to replace the gasoline running out of the tank through the fuel line as the engine runs. If air cannot get back into the gas tank, fuel will stop flowing out and the engine will die after running for a short time. The troubleshooting guide in the Pulsar manual also suggests a dirty fuel filter or air filter as causes of your problem. I assume you are using fresh fuel (less than six weeks old). That sounds obvious, but a friend brought his Husqvarna chain saw and wanted me to determine why it would not start. His fuel had been mixed and stored on a shelf for...

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    It sounds like a fuel system problem. I found an owner’s manual for a 900 Watt Pulsar generator at the Lowe’s web page. Did you open the air vent switch on the fuel cap before starting? Air must be able to get back into the gas tank to replace the gasoline running out of the tank through the fuel line as the engine runs. If air cannot get back into the gas tank, fuel will stop flowing out and the engine will die after running for a short time. The troubleshooting guide in the Pulsar manual also suggests a dirty fuel filter or air filter as causes of your problem. I assume you are using fresh fuel (less than six weeks old). That sounds obvious, but a friend brought his Husqvarna chain saw and wanted me to determine why it would not start. His fuel had been mixed and stored on a shelf for over a year! The saw ran great with fresh fuel. If you had old fuel in the tank, a new fuel filter might be a good idea.

    I am glad you are making progress. The illustration I saw in the electronic manual showed a two position “switch” on top of the fill cap for the fuel tank. An easy test for fuel tank venting is to run the engine for a few minutes, stop it, and unscrew the fill cap. If you sense a rush of sir into the tank when you crack the cap open, it is not venting properly. My son-in-law has a small generator and it is not Pulsar, but it also has a vent open/close switch on the fuel fill cap. I suppose those sre to keep vapors from getting into the atmosphere.

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  • Phil B's instructable Top Cap for a Razor's weekly stats: 5 weeks ago
    • Top Cap for a Razor
      126 views
      3 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Wood Bed Plane5 weeks ago
    Wood Bed Plane

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. Articles I had seen on making a wood bed plane seemed to require exotic woods and special tools plus very good skills. It was nice to find a way to use common wood, tools and skills to do a credible job. A key thing is scribbling a wavy pencil line across the bottom and then moving the bed back and forth on sandpaper against a flat surface to remove hollows and other irregularities. It takes some time, but the results are very, very good. A weak aspect of this is that the blade can too easily be knocked loose. A mechanical screw system could help a lot. You have the ability to modify any and all features on a plane like this to suit your exact needs. I wish you much success.

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  • I have long felt editors’ choices for what Instructsbles are featured and what Instructables are not often have very little to do with the quality of the Instructable or how beneficial the key idea in the Instructable is for viewers, but instead pertains to some factor of “cool” that can be just silly. The new changes do not help that situation. Previously someone with a need could still find a helpful Instructable, even if it did not get featured.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Sharpen Your Drill Bits6 weeks ago
    Sharpen Your Drill Bits

    I am glad to know you have been able to use this. It seems one option would be to remount the sharpening guide so the bit touches the side of the grinding wheel. I know that is not recommended practice, but you can probably get a way with it for sharpening a few drills now and then. Another option would be to get a new abrasive wheel and use you old wheel for rough work. A couple of years ago I saw a video that made sharpening drills by hand easy and have been doing that ever since. Sometimes I need to sharpen one a couple of times to get it close enough to right. In summary, hold the drill at the right angle. Touch the cutting edge to the wheel. Rotate the drill 180 degrees without changing the angle. Touch the other cutting edge to the wheel. Make the angle a little steeper and touch ...

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    I am glad to know you have been able to use this. It seems one option would be to remount the sharpening guide so the bit touches the side of the grinding wheel. I know that is not recommended practice, but you can probably get a way with it for sharpening a few drills now and then. Another option would be to get a new abrasive wheel and use you old wheel for rough work. A couple of years ago I saw a video that made sharpening drills by hand easy and have been doing that ever since. Sometimes I need to sharpen one a couple of times to get it close enough to right. In summary, hold the drill at the right angle. Touch the cutting edge to the wheel. Rotate the drill 180 degrees without changing the angle. Touch the other cutting edge to the wheel. Make the angle a little steeper and touch the area behind the cutting edge to the wheel on both sides to reduce the shoulder on both sides. Finally, touch the cutting edge on both sides to the wheel and roll the drill to smooth the top of the drill from the cutting edge over the shoulder and off the back end. Check the web to see that it is centered and not too wide.

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  • Phil B's instructable Funnel Support for Gas Fill's weekly stats: 6 weeks ago
    • Funnel Support for Gas Fill
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      0 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Crazy Good Sleep2 months ago
    Crazy Good Sleep

    I have read Clint Ober’s book, “Earthing.” An anti-static strap for working on computers has a 1M resistor in-line. The book says do not use an anti-static strap because the resistance is too high to allow electron flow from the earth to your body. If you are worried about some some adverse electrical event, the book advised an in-line 2 milliamp fuse. If you read carefully what I wrote about inflammation and positively charged free radicals, it makes very good sense. You will sleep better, although you may also be awake during the night, if you have been exoeriencing that.

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  • Kathryn,Thank you so much for your comment. I am glad you have been able to keep your various ski machines working well over the years, in part, by floating metallic dust out of the one-way needle bearings in the rollers. It is amazing what some basic mechanical knowledge coupled with a little intuition and intelligent guessing can accomplish. The thanks goes to the folks at Instructables for keeping things like this available. Of course, they are involved in a commercial endeavor and need people to submit things others will want to view so the site owners can entice advertising dollars. What you found here is part of Community topics and discussions. Most of the things I post are in the section where you can view steps with photos or video showing how the author did or accomplished som...

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    Kathryn,Thank you so much for your comment. I am glad you have been able to keep your various ski machines working well over the years, in part, by floating metallic dust out of the one-way needle bearings in the rollers. It is amazing what some basic mechanical knowledge coupled with a little intuition and intelligent guessing can accomplish. The thanks goes to the folks at Instructables for keeping things like this available. Of course, they are involved in a commercial endeavor and need people to submit things others will want to view so the site owners can entice advertising dollars. What you found here is part of Community topics and discussions. Most of the things I post are in the section where you can view steps with photos or video showing how the author did or accomplished something. The subject areas are quite varied. Many of my submissions involve building or fixing something useful inexpensively. There is always the challenge of showing how to do a repair without the need for expensive tools the average person will not have.

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  • Fix a Cruise Control Switch--Olds Alero (and Others)

    Thank you for the report. I am glad it worked for you and saved you a bunch of money, no doubt.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue2 months ago
    Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue

    Thank you for looking. I am glad you may be able to use this. I do like the side slide switch, but a faster fix would have been to mount a small twist switch near where the piwer cord comes into the tool.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make a Garmin Vehicle Power Cable Work Again2 months ago
    Make a Garmin Vehicle Power Cable Work Again

    If you need traffic updates, there is the app. WAZE for a smart phone. Users report traffic problems in real time and WAZE reroutes you, if necessary. Of course, that does not help your Nuvi funtion better.

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  • Radial Arm Saw Table Alignment -- an Easier Way

    EBay does have some. They call them table clamps. https://www.ebay.com/itm/CRAFTSMAN-RADIAL-ARM-SAW-PARTS-2-TABLE-TOP-CLAMPS-113-xxx/143192754897?hash=item2156f40ad1:g:hdUAAOSwGEJcnnDu

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  • Radial Arm Saw Table Alignment -- an Easier Way

    I would have to open the manual for my saw to gove you the name. I digitized it some time ago. You might find them at eBay. Or, I did an Instructable on using wooden wedges. Those worked wuite well. https://www.instructables.com/id/Sears-Radial-Arm-Saw-Homemade-Table-Clamp/

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack2 months ago
    Rebuilding a Hydraulic Floor Jack

    It is your choice. But, I worked carefully and found my jack completely safe when finished. As with any jack the user wants a failsafe of sturdy blocks in case even a new jack fails or leaks down in use so the user is not pinned under a vehicle.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make a Garmin Vehicle Power Cable Work Again2 months ago
    Make a Garmin Vehicle Power Cable Work Again

    You are probably correct about the green light. My guess is the cable has flexed enough over the years that a wire inside has frayed and broken. That usually happens near one of the ends, either where the cable comes out of the power converter or near the plug that attaches to the GPS. Sometimes you can plug the power converter into a cigarette lighter on the car and flex the cable to see if the GPS will come on intermittently. If it does, cut out about two in hes of the cable and solder the new end back in place. Or, you might be sble to find another power converter with the same end to fit the GPS to use.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Crazy Good Sleep2 months ago
    Crazy Good Sleep

    Thank you for looking at this. Today I talked to a man probably about 80. I had made a wire for his daughter (chrinic back pain from a fall 20 years ago) and he finally decided to try it before giving it to her in another state. He was surprised to discover he did not need to get up during the night either night to use the bathroom. But, it is different for different people. I did not experience that until after three weeks. I mentioned Clint Ober. His first try with this was with a strip of metallic duck tape stuck the length of his bed on the sheet. He ran a wire out of the window and pushed a rod into the ground. He slept very well without his usual Advil for falling asleep and his back pain was better in the morning. I gave a wire to my son and his back pain was better after the fir...

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    Thank you for looking at this. Today I talked to a man probably about 80. I had made a wire for his daughter (chrinic back pain from a fall 20 years ago) and he finally decided to try it before giving it to her in another state. He was surprised to discover he did not need to get up during the night either night to use the bathroom. But, it is different for different people. I did not experience that until after three weeks. I mentioned Clint Ober. His first try with this was with a strip of metallic duck tape stuck the length of his bed on the sheet. He ran a wire out of the window and pushed a rod into the ground. He slept very well without his usual Advil for falling asleep and his back pain was better in the morning. I gave a wire to my son and his back pain was better after the first night. I am not an electronics engineer, but did some thinking about electron current flow (- to +) rather than conventional current flow (+ to -) in a diode and decided I want the silver band on the wall outlet side of the diode rather than on the side of my body. That appears to be the proper decision.Thank you for commenting. Please let me know what happens. Some results you experience may not appear for a few weeks or a few months. Others may appear right away. Deeper sleep with a greater feeling of being rested in the morning is very common. It is good to hear from you again.

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  • Phil B's instructable Crazy Good Sleep's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • Crazy Good Sleep
      140 views
      0 favorites
      2 comments
  • Your post is identical to one below from a couple of weeks before yours. Are you two the same person?

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  • Phil B commented on seamster's instructable How to Make a Custom Sewing Machine Case3 months ago
    How to Make a Custom Sewing Machine Case

    Very nice work. Things I do never look quite so neat. A few months ago I worked on a similar machine fot someone, but much newer, probably from the early 2000s. I think it was a Pfaff. The motor did not run at all. The shop the owner she trusts was steering her to a new machine for $700 and telling her how expensive it would be to install a new motor. I looked at the old motor and held some very fine sandpaper against the darkened copper commutator sections while I turned the armature by hand. It took a while, but as soon as the commutator was clean and bright the machine ran like new. This could easily be a problem on a machine from the 1930s or 1940s, too.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Bicycle Torque Wrench From a Fisherman's Scale3 months ago
    Bicycle Torque Wrench From a Fisherman's Scale

    Merv,Thank you for the comment and for the video. I like your video. Your video mentioned paying attention in school. I tried to, al least for things related to mathematics and physics. English literature, not so much. It is amazing how often those things have been useful for solving a real world problem.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Crazy Good Sleep3 months ago
    Crazy Good Sleep

    I hope you carefully read steps 2 and 3. Most of your concerns are addressed there. Clint Ober’s book “Earthing” discusses grounding in a lightning storm. He lays out reasons why it is probably not a problem, but then finishes by saying it might be good to err on the side of caution and not ground in a storm. A static protective wrist band has a high resistance like you suggest, but folks are told not to have an inline resistance high in Ohms because it stops the electron flow that is beneficial.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Ramps for a Low Car3 months ago
    Ramps for a Low Car

    The wireless doorbell should work well for you. A nice extra feature would hsve been to make the position of the switch adjustable. I got used to where I located my switch, but being able to shift it for a little earlier warning would hsve been nice, too. Let us know how it works out for you. Thank you for looking.

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  • Setup of $89 Harbor Freight Flux Core Welder

    I used a Hobart Handler 125EZ flux core welder for about seven years. It was an affordable wire feed welder for smaller things. Flux core wire really works better with DC welding current, but the Harbor Freight welder is AC output. Some buy an inexpensive Chinese bridge rectifier to convert the output current to DC, and it improves the performance. Still, the welder will not have all of the refinements a more expensive welder has to make a good stable arc.Try different flux core wire. I like Hobart wire. It just performs better than others I tried. A common fan like you use in your home to stay cool is an asset when welding with flux core so you can blow away all of the smoke it makes. That smoke makes it really difficult to see where you are welding. Place the fan as near to the weld s...

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    I used a Hobart Handler 125EZ flux core welder for about seven years. It was an affordable wire feed welder for smaller things. Flux core wire really works better with DC welding current, but the Harbor Freight welder is AC output. Some buy an inexpensive Chinese bridge rectifier to convert the output current to DC, and it improves the performance. Still, the welder will not have all of the refinements a more expensive welder has to make a good stable arc.Try different flux core wire. I like Hobart wire. It just performs better than others I tried. A common fan like you use in your home to stay cool is an asset when welding with flux core so you can blow away all of the smoke it makes. That smoke makes it really difficult to see where you are welding. Place the fan as near to the weld seam as is practical. Flux core is to be drug, not pushed, when welding. I now have a real MIG welder and I can pull or push the bead. Pushing puts more light on the open seam so I can see more easily and stay on the seam. Prepare the joint well for good root penetration. Weld 1/8" stock from both sides. Anything larger than 1/8" should be ground to make a "V" where the joint will be. Remove slag before welding over a previous weld.I like to tack the weld different places. Then weld toward a tack, dragging the gun rather than pushing it because it is flux core. "If there is slag, you drag." Light from the arc will reflect off of the nearby tack and make it much easier to see where you are welding.Always pick up metal while wearing gloves or use a pliers or tong. You always forget metal may be hot, and you get burned. It is no fun.

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  • Radial Arm Saw Table Alignment -- an Easier Way

    Mine has no slots, but the holes for the screws are somewhat oversized to allow adjustment.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work3 months ago
    Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work

    I looked at a Lutron 3-wqy dimmer switch on the Home Depot page. In the FAQs someone asked your question. Several answered in agreement that only one of the switches can be a dimmer switch. All others in the circuit must be a conventional switch, not a dimmer.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Safety Razor Handle4 months ago
    Safety Razor Handle

    Thank you. My wife bought a cylinder of alum for me and it is quite effective. From what I read, the alum is a salt that causes fine blood vessels to constrict. I very seldom get a cut, unless there is a bump or two in the skin.

    It is good to hear from you. I had come to think the $6 razor shown would not give a decent shave, but as I learned better technique I found it does better than I expected. The heavier handle shown in this Instructsble helps a lot, too. Someone said when you are beginning you think you need a different razor. After you become more practiced you find you can get a good shave from any razor. I had turned a wooden bowl for whipping up lather, but should have made the diameter a little larger. Foam tends to flow over the sides. Very recently I was in a Wal-mart and saw a plastic salsa bowl about four inches in diameter for less that two dollars. It works perfectly and is a lot less costly than some of the branded ceramic bowls available at shaving supplies sites.I could have mentioned using...

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    It is good to hear from you. I had come to think the $6 razor shown would not give a decent shave, but as I learned better technique I found it does better than I expected. The heavier handle shown in this Instructsble helps a lot, too. Someone said when you are beginning you think you need a different razor. After you become more practiced you find you can get a good shave from any razor. I had turned a wooden bowl for whipping up lather, but should have made the diameter a little larger. Foam tends to flow over the sides. Very recently I was in a Wal-mart and saw a plastic salsa bowl about four inches in diameter for less that two dollars. It works perfectly and is a lot less costly than some of the branded ceramic bowls available at shaving supplies sites.I could have mentioned using shims to make a mild razor more aggressive. The adjustable razors came about decades after guys first began to shim their razors to suit individual needs. Whiskers on an older guy need a little more aggressive cut than a younger guy needs. The first shims were old razor blades trimmed to remove the sharp edges. Now people use plastic from various food containers. Still, some razors are better than others. The Merkur 23C I bought is easier and nicer to use than my $6 razor. Did you see the Instructsble I did on a razor travel case from a PVC Tee and a threaded piece of 1/2 inch PVC? That is also a way to go cheap. I use that case when I travel and it works very well.

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  • Phil B commented on t3chflicks's instructable Wireless Charging Sofa4 months ago
    Wireless Charging Sofa

    About three weeks ago I saw some material about earthing. It suggests we are surrounded by electrical static energy that upsets the balance of electrons in our bodies. Things like wireless chargers would be part of the problem, especially if they are where you spend time. Earthing sounds like a pseudo-science or medical quackery, especially when some of its advocates speak in New Age terminology. But, I took an old watch with a metallic wrist band and slipped a thin copper wire around it to keep the wire in place. Then I connected the wire to a short piece of 3/16 inch rod and stuck it into the third prong on an electrical wall outlet like the kind used in the USA. Since I began sleeping with that, I believe I am sleeping more soundly based on how easily I go back to sleep when awake an...

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    About three weeks ago I saw some material about earthing. It suggests we are surrounded by electrical static energy that upsets the balance of electrons in our bodies. Things like wireless chargers would be part of the problem, especially if they are where you spend time. Earthing sounds like a pseudo-science or medical quackery, especially when some of its advocates speak in New Age terminology. But, I took an old watch with a metallic wrist band and slipped a thin copper wire around it to keep the wire in place. Then I connected the wire to a short piece of 3/16 inch rod and stuck it into the third prong on an electrical wall outlet like the kind used in the USA. Since I began sleeping with that, I believe I am sleeping more soundly based on how easily I go back to sleep when awake and how I feel in the morning. It is not costing me anything and I will give it a test for ten weeks. But, if earthing is beneficial, a wireless charger where you sit is not what you want.

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  • Paul,Thank you so much for sharing what you found. If someone asks and has not read these comments, I will find yours and mention it. Regards,Phil

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Safety Razor Handle4 months ago
    Safety Razor Handle

    Thank you. It is good to share something someone with only a few tools could do, and it can be part of something that saves the user quite a bit of money.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Making Your Own Slide Rule4 months ago
    Making Your Own Slide Rule

    Thank you for sharing your story. There have been several revolutionary changes in recent decades. For one, I think about the change from points and condenser automobile engine ignition to electronic ignition. Timing lights and dwell tachometers are obsolete.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer4 months ago
    Brush Blade for a Weed Trimmer

    Thank you. I have had interesting problems to solve.

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  • The checks you suggest are all good, but, you can see from the comments of others below many have had difficulty when the one-way needle bearing inside a drive roller began to slip. The professional fix is to replace both rollers or press new bearings inside the rollers. You can also see commenters solved their problem at home when they flushed, dried, and lightly lubricated the bearings inside the drive rollers using a drop or two of ATF. I myself have improved the performance of two machines this way and used both with no problems for several years afterward.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue4 months ago
    Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue

    You also want to avoid making the linkage weaker so that it might bend in the stress of use. I have decided no shorting can happen if the linkage is narrow enoigh that it cannot bridge both terminals simulataneously. After several months of use, the linkage has not worn away insulation on either terminal, so narrowing it was effective and still did not weaken the linkage too much. Adding heat shrink material also adds something that causes drag and impedes the free movement of the linkage, even if the linkage was thinned for it.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Easy Monitor for NordicTrack Skier4 months ago
    Easy Monitor for NordicTrack Skier

    Thank you for your comment and information. As I mentioned to BridgetJ10, a friend who repairs and rebuilds NordicTrack skiers told me NordicTrack used two calibrations on its monitors over the years. I do not know which monitors used which calibration, nor how much one calibration differed from the other. My attempt at calibrating the bicycle spedometer was relatively non-scientific. I adjusted it until it felt as close as possible to the factory monitor we had been using. I find my best use of a monitor is to compare today’s effort to yesterday’s so I know if I am doing sbout the same work.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Making Your Own Slide Rule4 months ago
    Making Your Own Slide Rule

    The slide rule you made is very impressive. When I post something like my slide rule, I check to see what others have done that is similar and try to acknowledge those offerings. I want readers to know I did not shoot from the hip, but did some research before posting. I also want them to know about other offerings that may be more suitable to their purposes, and to know how what I am posting is different, in case that is what they want and need. Thank you for your comment.

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  • Spanner Wrench for Whirlpool or Kenmore Washer Tub Nut

    I no longer have it, but 2 1/2 in h is probably corrrect.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts4 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    The model number should be on an aluminum plate on the side under the table. These were made from the late 1940s through the late 1960s. Somewhere on mine there is a month/year code that is pretty obvious.

    Is the saw designed with no knob at the end of the arm, or is the knob simply missing? Some saws had an “L”-shaped lever on the side of the column to index the arm and another lever with a screw theead to lock the arm in place. There are people selling parts of these saws. You may be able to pick up an entire arm for your saw. eBay is one source. I also found a guy who apparently has bought up quite a few parts for these saws. I will need to check with him about giving out his name.

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  • Here is an image from a skier manual I found on-line. It may not be as helpful as I hoped. But, typical of what I have seen, the small axles for the rollers st the ends of the skiis have two flats at one end and threads at the other. I believe you will need to remove the side bosrds. My friend NordicDanny has quite a collection of old skiers and can probably supply parts, maybe even new parts, as well as suggestions on removal and installation. He has a web page at nordicfitnessskimachines (dot) com.

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  • Paul,I am also using a Pro, but it is mid-90s. My friend, NordicDanny, repairs ski machines professionally and knows all about all of the changes from year to year. You could send him a private message. Sometimes you can find a manual on-line with an exploded diagram to help you. Your photo is a little different than my machine. Could you try spraying those rollers with a solvent (WD-40?) and riding the machine several times to break up and flush out any gumming, then lubricate it with oil? You might do that repeatedly until all is good. The manual with mine suggests a few drops of motor oil once a month for regular lubrication, but how much you use the machine would make a difference, too.I am not a very consistent user of my ski machine. I had a Challenger and have a Pro now. I did th...

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    Paul,I am also using a Pro, but it is mid-90s. My friend, NordicDanny, repairs ski machines professionally and knows all about all of the changes from year to year. You could send him a private message. Sometimes you can find a manual on-line with an exploded diagram to help you. Your photo is a little different than my machine. Could you try spraying those rollers with a solvent (WD-40?) and riding the machine several times to break up and flush out any gumming, then lubricate it with oil? You might do that repeatedly until all is good. The manual with mine suggests a few drops of motor oil once a month for regular lubrication, but how much you use the machine would make a difference, too.I am not a very consistent user of my ski machine. I had a Challenger and have a Pro now. I did the procedure I described for restoring the drive rollers on both machines and there were no problems later, only renewed good performance.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts5 months ago
    The Radial Arm Saw -- a Guide of Sorts

    Ron,I have been thinking sbout your problem. I assume you mean you have locked down the knob on the arm, but it is still able to move a little left and right. Does the indexing pin fall into place? Can you tighten the knob? I have never taken apart the mechanism that keeps the arm from moving on the column. Those who have complain about great difficulty getting all of the pieces back together in working order. I am wondering if a previous owner took the locking mechanism apart and did not get it back together again properly.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter5 months ago
    EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter

    I am confused. Did I mention an LED meter? I know I have seen LED voltmeters, but they give you a voltage range, like greater than 120 VAC, greater than 240 VAC, and greater than 440 VAC. They do not give a precise reading like 117 volts. But, those meters are only for voltages. I have not seen any that give readings for current, resistance, and the other functions on a multimeter. I did a couple of quick searches and found hits for VU meters, but no DIY electrical circuit meters.

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  • Transmission fluid is interesting stuff. It is designed to provide a little lubrication, but without slippage. If your initial application of WD-40 could have dried in the air it would probsbly have worked, but you had not taken the roller assembly apart and the bearings could not dry. Liquid Wrench has always been my favorite penetrating oil, but, it is also the only one I have known since I was a child and saw my father using it around sixty years sgo. I was surprised to learn WD-40 will flush the one-way roller besrings and dry, too. I think you will be surprised how much use you can get from your rollers before you need to flush and lubricate them again. Perhaps if there is some rust in them, more of it will break loose and you will need to flush them again in the nearer future. Oth...

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    Transmission fluid is interesting stuff. It is designed to provide a little lubrication, but without slippage. If your initial application of WD-40 could have dried in the air it would probsbly have worked, but you had not taken the roller assembly apart and the bearings could not dry. Liquid Wrench has always been my favorite penetrating oil, but, it is also the only one I have known since I was a child and saw my father using it around sixty years sgo. I was surprised to learn WD-40 will flush the one-way roller besrings and dry, too. I think you will be surprised how much use you can get from your rollers before you need to flush and lubricate them again. Perhaps if there is some rust in them, more of it will break loose and you will need to flush them again in the nearer future. Otherwise, I think you will be pleased. They will go a long time before you need to do anything to them. Thank you for the report.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Easy Monitor for NordicTrack Skier5 months ago
    Easy Monitor for NordicTrack Skier

    Thank you for your comment. You are to be commended for your clever solution to your need. A good friend repairs NordicTrack skier equipment and knows a lot sbout all of their skier items. He told me the calibration is not the same on all NordicTrack monitor models, but some were calibrated a bit differently. He did not give me any additional details. That might account for the discrepancy between readings you got and the calibration I suggested. I do not know for certain.

    We would need model numbers before I could ask my friend. I did pass on to hum the first of these Schwinn monitors I calibrated for a skier. He wanted to pair it with an official monitor, but they interferred with one another when connected directly as part of the same circuit. I do not know if he pursued it any further. And, welcome to Instructsbles. Unless you just “lurk” you will make friends from all over, some from overseas. Although it is not linked here, I did post in the Community section about refurbishing NordicTrack rollers. Often they begin to “hiccup” and you can restore them by removing the rollers, flushing them a bit with even WD-40, sopping up fluid from your flushing with a tissue until there is no more gray stain from fine metallic dust, and letting them air dry. If y...

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    We would need model numbers before I could ask my friend. I did pass on to hum the first of these Schwinn monitors I calibrated for a skier. He wanted to pair it with an official monitor, but they interferred with one another when connected directly as part of the same circuit. I do not know if he pursued it any further. And, welcome to Instructsbles. Unless you just “lurk” you will make friends from all over, some from overseas. Although it is not linked here, I did post in the Community section about refurbishing NordicTrack rollers. Often they begin to “hiccup” and you can restore them by removing the rollers, flushing them a bit with even WD-40, sopping up fluid from your flushing with a tissue until there is no more gray stain from fine metallic dust, and letting them air dry. If you wish, you can lubricate them with a couple of drops of ATF transmission fluid. It is a terribly cheap alternstive to replacing the rollers and it most often works.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Great Projects From Old How-to Magazines5 months ago
    Great Projects From Old How-to Magazines

    Tom,Welcome to Instructsbles! Enjoy exploring.

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  • Phil B commented on dkeating2's instructable Low Cost Adjustable Rail 4x5 View Camera5 months ago
    Low Cost Adjustable Rail 4x5 View Camera

    There was a time when I so would have loved to do this. You did a great job. Thank you.

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  • Phil B commented on Prototyp 81's forum topic Your instructable failed to publish!5 months ago

    Lately I have gotten this error message, too. It happens when I try to publish from my Windows 7 laptop. A few minutes later I can go to my iPad, access the Instructable from my Drafts, and successfully publish it with no problems. I wrote to Instructables and was advised this is most often a problem with something in the computer's cache.

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  • Phil B's instructable File an Internal Keyway by Hand's weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • File an Internal Keyway by Hand
      157 views
      1 favorites
      0 comments
  • Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue's weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue
      4,611 views
      7 favorites
      8 comments
  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue5 months ago
    Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue

    Thank you. A Merry Christmas also to you.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue5 months ago
    Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue

    Thank you. Heat shrink tubing would be worth a try. Whatever makes the linkage wider also makes it thicker, and added thickness in some areas also restricts the ability of the linkage to slide and release. I think the linkage is supposed to release fairly easily so the grinder shuts off if anything jars it, especially anything dangerous to the user.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Improving a Hand Truck6 months ago
    Improving a Hand Truck

    Yours is an interesting idea. Remember that st the time I did this we were days from loading a truck and moving across the country. All but a very few hand tools were already packed and not so easy to find.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Homemade Jack Stands6 months ago
    Homemade Jack Stands

    Thank you. Mine did work well for the time I needed them. I have always like things with three legs because they are always stable, even on rough or uneven surfaces.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue6 months ago
    Harbor Freight Grinder Rescue

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. I expect these Chinese grinders are available in New Zealand, too, although likely with a different brand name. Several of their electric tools use the same motor with a different head. I expect they all have the same failure prone plastic linkage or one very similar to it. I am also very much aware of what it was like before I had a welder and try to provide an option for people in that situation when possible. A Merry Christmas to you.

    Thank you for looking and commenting. Five years of service for ten dollars sounds like you have already gotten your money out of it. Mine was only a few months old when the linkage broke. If you have gotten five years of service your switch arrangement must be more dursble. My son-in-law buys very good name brand grinders and runs them continuously. He overheats them and burns them up. When the metal head gets the least bit warm I make certain I give it a rest so it can cool.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work6 months ago
    Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work

    I cannot conceive of any way wires to and from a 4-way switch could supply power for the lightning circuit.

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  • There are LED calculators on-line, also LED calculator apps. Just enter 12 volts as your source voltage and indicate the current should be in the 20 to 25 milliamp range. Then indicate 2 volts is the load or LED voltage. The calculator will give you the value of the resistor. I did this when I wanted to illuminate the smoked gray plastic water reservoir on a Keurig coffeemaker. I had an LED pencil flashlight and wanted to power it with a 9 volt battery after that battery was replaced with a new battery for a smoke detector. The flashlight may have had its own internal resisance. It was designed to run on two very expensive 3 volt batteries, so I indicated 6 volts as the load voltsge. The calculator told me to use a 150 Ohm resistor, and it worked like a charm. (I just ran your numbers i...

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    There are LED calculators on-line, also LED calculator apps. Just enter 12 volts as your source voltage and indicate the current should be in the 20 to 25 milliamp range. Then indicate 2 volts is the load or LED voltage. The calculator will give you the value of the resistor. I did this when I wanted to illuminate the smoked gray plastic water reservoir on a Keurig coffeemaker. I had an LED pencil flashlight and wanted to power it with a 9 volt battery after that battery was replaced with a new battery for a smoke detector. The flashlight may have had its own internal resisance. It was designed to run on two very expensive 3 volt batteries, so I indicated 6 volts as the load voltsge. The calculator told me to use a 150 Ohm resistor, and it worked like a charm. (I just ran your numbers in my LED app. On my phone and the answer is 500 Ohms.)

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter6 months ago
    EVERYONE Needs a Multi-Meter

    Thank you for looking and for commenting. Since posting this, I have watched coupons in Harbor Freight Tool advertisements and often found thise meters free with a purchase. I have gotten a few, mostly to give to friends who did not have a meter. I showed them how to test batteries. I showed them how to check for power in an outlet, but told them not to do it if they do not feel safe.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Copy Kindle Text6 months ago
    Copy Kindle Text

    In part, I post things like this so I can remember what I did months or years later when I need it again. I am glad it is useful to you. Thank you for your comment and for looking.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again6 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    By definition three phase power is AC only, not DC. It is about 208 volts. There are ways, albeit not very efficietnt, to run a three phase motor on single phase 220 volt current, but, if your wall outlet is 115 volts, it is an unworkable situation. I am not an expert, but this is what I remember reading. Perhaps someone can correct me.

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  • Phil B commented on Bootluck's instructable E-Cargo-Bike_DIY6 months ago
    E-Cargo-Bike_DIY

    Nett! Eine gute Arbeit!

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Cuptisserie With Four Spindles7 months ago
    Cuptisserie With Four Spindles

    Thank you for your comment and for looking. I encounter the lady who asked for this a couple of times a month, sometimes more. She is trying to be a wife, mom, nurse in a hospital, and a college student all at the same time. She says she loves her cuptisserie, but I am not sure how much she has been sble to use it. She has never shown me anything she has done on it. I am technically retired, but find myself making a lot of thIngs for other people at their request. Since I was a pastor for 40 years, I also get asked to fill in two or more times a month for other pastors who need to be away. This cuptisserie is fairly rugged. Much of that is due to scrap steel I happened to have available at the time.

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  • Phil B commented on djpolymath's instructable Shaving Brush7 months ago
    Shaving Brush

    The bristles are called a knot. They come pre-assembled with the bristles bundled together. Search the Internet using that term. Knots come in vsrying widths. Wider knots usually make more lather more quickly. Knots can be synthetic, boar, horse hair, and badger. Each has a different price.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Airline Travel Tips7 months ago
    Airline Travel Tips

    Thank you. Those are good observations.

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  • Phil B commented on Kryptonite's forum topic "Most Popular" ... ?7 months ago

    Featured status seems to be a subjective evaluation by an editor. Like you, some I thought might be featured were not and some were featured to my grest surprise. I have noticed some editors are more likely to festure an Instructable than are others. I gave up worrying sbout it and publish to please myself.

    Now and then one of my Instructsbles has been on the Popular page. Usually they were from years ago when they suddenly showed up as popular. For me the curious thIng was the number of views or favorites did not seem to rise significantly. It is all a mystery to me.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems7 months ago
    Curing 2-cycle Engine Problems

    Thank you, Louis, for the good news. I love it when small things make a big difference. I hope you find whatever makes it rough when it runs.

    Nick,I was not getting e-mail notificstions of comments, but Instructables has fixed the problem. So, I did not see your questions earlier. Could your air cleaner be blocked? The engine would be as if the choke is fully engaged and would flood easily. Try starting the engine with the air cleaner removed and see if that makes a difference. A couple of moves ago we gsve away the weed trimmer in the photos, but discovered we need one again and bought a Troy-bilt TB35EC a few months ago. Any problems with it have been due to a lean condition. I have not yet seen it flood. Customer reviews on it complain about hard starting after a season, maybe sooner. I have found screws loosen on it easily, including two on the back for the Quick Start power starter feature.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Make an Electric Motor Run Again7 months ago
    Make an Electric Motor Run Again

    Thank you. Until recently Amazon was my default site for much of my on-line shopping, but there have been recent developments to change that, and I discovered many things have a better price elsewhere.

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  • Phil B commented on Phil B's instructable Forged Split Steel Cross Simply Done7 months ago
    Forged Split Steel Cross Simply Done

    Thank you for looking and for your comment. The firebrick absorbs some heat initially, but once it has, it serves to concentrate the heat and bounce it back to the steel. There is quite a difference with the brick. Without it, the steel never would get hot enough to bend.

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