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  • DIY Mini Lab Power Supply

    Very well done! Particularly like the simple yet very informative explanations of why and how to calculate what you need to know! Thank you!

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  • Magnetic Helping Hands Set for PCB and Electronics

    Well done! Looks just as sturdy, and definitely much cheaper, than the commercially available tool! I found the angled drilling into the domed nut a bit excessive just to thread the wire into... I would likely have opted for a straight hole and epoxied the wire from the inside. Although, I can see how the part where the wire twists might be strengthening/ stiffening the wire a bit... Oh, ok, ...nevermind. ;-]

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  • The Valuable Coffee Jar

    Only a true Canadian would use a Tim Horton's jar as a secret safe to hide his Canadian Tire money! Cheers! ;-]

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  • Vintage Radio Turned Into a Phone Speaker

    There are no pictures of the side where the second speaker was installed. In order to maintain the antique radio look, it wouldn't do to just leave the speaker visible... What was used to cover it up? Perhaps a piece from the grill of the computer speaker?When you mention that the unit is now "stereo", I might point out that half of your audio image is being directed away from the listener -- which is not how stereo works. In fact, I would think that it is less desirable than if you'd simply converted the output to mono, and kept the enclosure intact. But, of course, hindsight is 20/20... Cheers from Canada! ;-)

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  • Steampunk Lamp "The MERKER Light"

    Excellent photography! I very much like the idea of reusing old designs with the new tech. Sick of generic black boxes! ;-)

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  • Vintage Flash Clock

    Now I know what to do for Christmas gifts next year... I have a bunch of those old flash units!

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  • RobertC2 commented on MarPok's instructable Retro-Futuristic USB Drive
    Retro-Futuristic USB Drive

    That last bit was brilliant!

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  • Cool Ways to Repurpose Old Computer Parts

    I reuse the wide flat cables in the much older machines, the IDE cables. Those are basically 40 little wires you can use individually, or strip away more than one and make your own flat cable with as many conductors as you need! Very useful!============Nice ideas!

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  • RUST!!! Removal. Using Electrolysis.

    I find myself wondering why the charger would do better than the computer PSU... Most battery chargers cannot provide as much current as the PSU, so why is it working better? Any ideas? Thanks for sharing! ;-)

    I made one based on a few different instructables... Unfortunately I did take pics of the unit, but this is what the face plate design looks like: https://www.dropbox.com/s/oqk7f4dioddw555/Power%20Supply%20face.JPG?dl=0It contains la list of other possible voltages that are possible using the same wires...

    Another thing to keep in mind is that these wires can be combined to give you many more voltages than the standard 3.3, 5, and 12 volts Instead of using the black wires as ground, use the lower of any combination of two wires... For example, negative on red wire (5v) and positive on yellow wire (12v) will give you 7 volts... The difference between the two voltages! Using the negative voltage wires (-5v White, -12v Blue) you stashed away will give you even more choices!There are many instructables on making a bench power supply from a computer PSU. Pretty handy for testing car audio equipment, led lights, other small projects.

    Thank you both!That makes perfect sense. ...I need more coffee. :-)

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  • The steel rod holds the pliers... the bottom is not really needed. Omitting it solves your impossibly unlikely problem from even happening.

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  • RobertC2 commented on lonesoulsurfer's instructable Magnetic 3rd Hand

    Thanks, that's something I hadn't even considered!

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  • RobertC2 commented on lonesoulsurfer's instructable Magnetic 3rd Hand

    Excellent idea! Love it! Definitely adding a magnet to my 3rd hand!Here's a dumb question: Can a magnet damage sensitive components, like a IC?

    Already have a 3rd hand device? Add a magnet to any of the metal alligator clips to see if you like how this concept works... then, if you like it, think about making it more permanent; with a larger magnet, perhaps.

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  • Cables! I thought I had a lot of old cables until my cousin died and I inherited his collection too... If I did this to all my USB cables, I could store all of Wikileaks! LOL

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  • @Ray Something to try: Try asking them to keep the iron locked up themselves, then only take it out those few times you need to solder something and they can be there watching... Then put it away again... At least you get to enjoy your hobby, and in time they will see how careful you are and finally let you keep it. Hope that works for you!

    Good idea!

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  • Cordless Tool Battery to USB Charger

    This is a very basic one for a DeWalt 14.4V battery...I used the same picture hanging hardware for the contacts but was forced to improvise a way to connect to the battery's less accessible DeWalt design... I used an upside down pill bottle and lots of epoxy to make a hooded plug and super-glued a sawed off USB car charger on top! I plan to hide the ugly epoxy job with tape...I realize that elsewhere in the comments, I propose a few more elaborate options, but in this case it was not for me. My sister just got rid of her landline phone, so I figured she could always use another way to charge her cellphone. ;-)Cheers!

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  • The Adafruit UBEC, used here on an 18V battery, is only rated up to 16V... This device , for 2 dollars more, is rated for up to 24V and has TWO --> 2.1A sockets that you can use at the same time! (Total: 4.2A)There are even better options, starting at around 13 dollars, like a trio of similar panel-mounted devices that will give you a normal dual USB socket with 5V 1A/2.1A (Total 3.1A), a 12V Car lighter socket*, and a Voltmeter to keep an eye on your battery level... * Why a Car lighter socket? -- LED lights often use 12 volts. Also, there are many other accessories that are made for use inside a car.-- Charge extra USB devices with a car charger plugged into it. One final suggestion: If this is truly meant as an emergency solution, then you might want to start thinking about how …

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    The Adafruit UBEC, used here on an 18V battery, is only rated up to 16V... This device , for 2 dollars more, is rated for up to 24V and has TWO --> 2.1A sockets that you can use at the same time! (Total: 4.2A)There are even better options, starting at around 13 dollars, like a trio of similar panel-mounted devices that will give you a normal dual USB socket with 5V 1A/2.1A (Total 3.1A), a 12V Car lighter socket*, and a Voltmeter to keep an eye on your battery level... * Why a Car lighter socket? -- LED lights often use 12 volts. Also, there are many other accessories that are made for use inside a car.-- Charge extra USB devices with a car charger plugged into it. One final suggestion: If this is truly meant as an emergency solution, then you might want to start thinking about how to charge this power-tool battery after you've drained it with all your toys! --> Next project: Charge your 18V Power-Tool Battery from your Car! ;-)

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  • Indeed, that would work too... In a system without major air leaks, there would be little if any difference in efficiency.But a good reason to do it the way you did it is that the fan blades remain relatively clean from whatever is in the fumes. (i.e.: the fans only physically touch clean air.)

    Seriously? Look at it... Did you see it? Did you read it?Fans above, filters below... Why would you want the device to blow the fumes back at your face? (I realize that there is a "Be Nice" policy, but that question is just really really dumb. My suggestion is: Sell all your sharp tools and take up knitting... Preferably the kind with blunt needles, so nobody loses an eye! LOL)

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  • Very kind...but that would be way too much work! Chiming in with little tweaks here and there is easier. ;-)

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  • You could make a very discreet Bluetooth speaker for your tool shed out of them! Apparently you can make a Bluetooth speaker out of pretty much anything! LOL

    Easy: Measure your old, messy paint cans and take notes... Head to the hardware store with your notepad and get whatever is closest but still smaller than the can. Use wide tape around the outside of the threaded coupling that you buy until it fits more snugly into your can... Now if you can take it from here. ;-)

    Just commenting as I read. No logical order to be found in my '2 cents' contributions. ;-)Step 6 (gluing the bottom to the threaded coupling) would be easier if you wait til after this step to glue the can's original lid down permanently. You could reach into the can from the top and unscrew the coupling til it touches the bottom. It's a more forgiving method of adjustment considering the potential mess of working with epoxy. ;-)

    Very cool idea, executed very well! Cheers from Canada!

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  • Here's my solution to proprietary cables, chargers, and connectors. Buy something else!If it's proprietary it is out to get your money, plain and simple. I will not encourage these companies, ever. There are two reasons to use proprietary tech: They want to force you to buy only their stuff, or they cannot make it work within industry standards. Neither is a valid reason. If they can't build something good enough to keep your business without resorting to extortion, then they are too corrupt to deserve your money! If they can't build something without having to modify the connectors for technical reasons, then they are too dumb to deserve your money. No compromises or restrictions! Enough of this planned obsolescence!No expansion memory slot? - Pass! No replaceable battery? - Pass! In…

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    Here's my solution to proprietary cables, chargers, and connectors. Buy something else!If it's proprietary it is out to get your money, plain and simple. I will not encourage these companies, ever. There are two reasons to use proprietary tech: They want to force you to buy only their stuff, or they cannot make it work within industry standards. Neither is a valid reason. If they can't build something good enough to keep your business without resorting to extortion, then they are too corrupt to deserve your money! If they can't build something without having to modify the connectors for technical reasons, then they are too dumb to deserve your money. No compromises or restrictions! Enough of this planned obsolescence!No expansion memory slot? - Pass! No replaceable battery? - Pass! Insanely over/under engineered software required to just connect it to your PC? - Pass!Won't charge at all through a standard socket without the "special" charger? - Pass!No standard headphone jack? - Pass! (I'm talking about you, Apple, Samsung, Microsoft, Garmin,etc. -- Ok, mostly Apple! lol)Lets stop pretending that these are good things... they are not. Rant over... Carry on. ;-)

    But, that being said, thank you for taking the time to share this with us... If I can't have what I want, I'll do all I can can to thwart their efforts by using and propagating every hack I can find! ;-)

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  • RobertC2 commented on rmomberg's instructable Lab ATX Powersupply
  • Heatsinks are often made of aluminium and are very easy to cut with a hacksaw or a rotary cutting wheel device like a Dremel. But, like the man said, the dimensions are not all that critical. Use what you have and make it close if you can. It should work fine. ;-)

    There are two wires coming out of Pelletier device -- One is red, that is the positive voltage. Run wires directly to fan motor. Red wire goes to +.Congrats, you are done!Now do you really need a video for that?! ;-)

    I like how you went kinda nuts with the springs! ;-)

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  • RobertC2 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Rotating TV

    LOL, that was brilliant!

    Try getting motors from old printers... they are often very powerful for their size and they may already be attached to gears, and other mechanisms that you can use.

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  • RobertC2 commented on jason.burr.946's instructable Elven Keyboard

    Wow! ...Just, wow!With absolutely no intention of building one, I nevertheless read most of this instructable. I have to say it was fascinating to see your creativity at work. Not only was it well written, it was quite amusing. The "instant dreadlocks" was my favorite, I do hope you were kidding! I particularly appreciated the fact that you had no fancy tools, Arduino, laser cutter, or 3D printer! -- You worked with what was available, without following any instructions. You made a functional piece of art from junk. Impressive, indeed!Thank you very much for the time it took to share your journey with us!

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  • Sand in the frying pan! -- I'm definitely trying that! Thanks!

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  • What are you talking about? You are misinterpreting the comment as negative and going off for no reason at all. Who's a troll?! Or a schmuck?! Name calling, really? What happened to "if you haven't anything good to say, don't say anything at all"?Anders644PI is a big boy, he can defend himself. If he was offended, I trust he would have said so. As for your evaluation of the work, I totally agree... However, you are way off if you think you have a case against my intentions. It was a suggestion that he make his title fit the project. There was no disrespect intended in our comments. In fact, I only chimed in because the author's response to the initial advice from another user was not really addressing the problem; as if he was too close to the project to see why the title wa…

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    What are you talking about? You are misinterpreting the comment as negative and going off for no reason at all. Who's a troll?! Or a schmuck?! Name calling, really? What happened to "if you haven't anything good to say, don't say anything at all"?Anders644PI is a big boy, he can defend himself. If he was offended, I trust he would have said so. As for your evaluation of the work, I totally agree... However, you are way off if you think you have a case against my intentions. It was a suggestion that he make his title fit the project. There was no disrespect intended in our comments. In fact, I only chimed in because the author's response to the initial advice from another user was not really addressing the problem; as if he was too close to the project to see why the title was actually wrong. So I wanted him to take another look. By being specific about the error, I figured he'd get it. We simply want other users to be able to FIND the instructable without getting upset when they realize that the title mislead them to something that is NOT a TV. Fine, let it get lost in the shuffle... But, seriously, this guide is way too well done to be lost!As for making my own instructables, how is that a necessary step to posting comments? Some of us are here to get ideas, but are not necessarily ready to post anything. I have taken ideas from many sources and made my own projects better because of it. I checked your page: ONE instructable... And a winner no less! Bravo! So, should you be restricted to commenting only on making bread? Of course not. Anyway, I will thank you to concern yourself with my comments when they are inaccurate. Otherwise, kindly refrain from inventing your own motivations for what others say or do. I am neither jealous nor am I a troll, or a schmuck. Just evaluating as honestly and clearly as I can. Sure I could have been a little more delicate with my opinion on the aesthetics of his "TV" design, but a little sarcasm never hurt anyone... But, as the author will receive this comment too, I will take this opportunity to apologize for any perceived insult. [ Anders644PI, I'm sorry if you were offended by my comment. ]But still, I stand by its content. The title is (still) badly worded, and the 'TV-look', although a good idea, is lacking enough detail to make it a total success. Everything else looks brilliant! ...Now go make some bread or something! ;-)

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  • Makes me wanna get drunk just so I can justify having one tomorrow!

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  • Sorry, dude, but fly_boy is right. Your title says "...retro looking TV..." which, in English, means that it is a TV that is retro-looking. As awkward as it sounds, you want to say it's a portable (dunno 'bout pocket-sized) touchscreen game pad that happens to look like a retro TV (except for the no knobs thing and the big ugly wire coming out the top).Just change the title. :-)

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  • There is only ONE connector that is used for Input when charging, and Output when powering something. No need for 2 connections since the pack is not meant to be used and charged at the same time.

    Wires were not used for those connections... The ends from the longer nickel strips that protrude past the edge of the battery pack are soldered directly to the board. That is why mounting the board where it is was such a genius idea!

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  • Nice!One question: What is the 4th 18650 cell used for? Parts list says 4, text says 4, pics show 3...

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  • No, you cannot. Microwave ovens work by exciting water molecules within the thing being 'heated'... there is practically no moisture inside HDPE and therefore it will not melt from any heat produced within it.

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  • RobertC2 commented on samvanhook's instructable Giant Wooden Head

    Yes! That's exactly what I thought too! That 1974 film was was so weird and wonderful... think Sean Connery in red and black S&M gear falling for the beautiful Charlotte Rampling in hippies and crystals future distopia. Good fun! Lol

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  • Compared to what's going on inside the motor, a little magnet on the outside is irrelevant.

    Sorry, I disagree. I know it would seem to be an obvious assumption, but it would be a huge exaggeration. It's a matter of scale...The screw's residual magnetic field is too weak to have any effect on a computer. Away from the magnet, it's barely strong enough for the screws to cling to each other! You could safely rest half a dozen of those screws on top of your hard drive and it would do absolutely nothing measurable. Been using a magnetic container for laptop screws for years with zero havoc. In fact, there are electronics repair mats that have built-in magnets for exactly that purpose. So, unless you're rubbing a hard drive with a huge magnet, like what you'd find in a microwave, then you're fine.

    Good one! Did the same for the long window in my metal door.

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  • You will need to mount the sensor on the mic stand under the mic, aiming toward the person talking, and use a 5V relay to interrupt the mic's wiring. You will need to cut an extra mic cable to do this, preferably a short one. If your mic uses XLR (3 pin) connectors, look up how they work to be sure you wire it right.

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  • I must admit, I have little interest in building this. But I just had to see how a Metal Detector could be referred to as being "Eco Friendly"! Now I know.Very well structured instructable! Cheers!

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  • A slightly alarmist statement... There is zero heavy-metal poisoning. The metals in solder cannot become gaseous at that temperature. All the fumes from soldering are from the flux. Not healthy, but certainly NOT heavy-metal poison. A well placed fan is sufficient if working outside.

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  • Thanks, I'll be trying some of these.Small correction:At the end of step 1, a "Viola!" is a stringed musical instrument larger than a violin, but smaller than a cello. I believe you meant to say: Voilà!Which is French for "See There" or, more appropriately, "There ya go!" (or, "Ta-Da!") ;-)

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  • "Epoxy generally survives high temperatures well, and it bonds strong."I fixed a cracked car radiator with epoxy, years ago. It lasted an extra 6 months!

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  • RobertC2 commented on Kudelkin's instructable Tool “Third Hand”

    Looks like an antique tool from the 40's... it might have come from my grandfather's jewelry shop! Beautiful work!

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  • Flange... Home Depot ($13.98) ?????14 bucks for a little metal flange? That's insane! Yeah, no! I woulda used a piece of 2 by 4. Not as nice, but for fourteen bucks you can buy a few more Helping Hands sets and build one with multiple bases. 14 bucks for a flange... Ha!

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  • RobertC2 commented on rmomberg's instructable Lab ATX Powersupply

    Very nice! Love the case!Small corrections needed in Step 2, In this paragraph, there are errors. Not in the math, but in the Volt and Amp symbols used in the equations."We need to load the 5V rail with 10W total, so we need to find the correct resistance. for that we need to find the amperage of the resistor. that we can do by rearrange the P=U*I so well get I=P/U which gives us I=10/5A=2AThen we can find R with rearranging the U=I*R formula, so we get R=U/I=5/2Ohm=2.5Ohm."--> Should be: I = 10W / 5V = 2A, and R = 5V / 2A = 2.5 OhmsCheers!

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  • Brilliant upgrade! *(adds corner clamp to shopping list)

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  • "...I then impressed the wooden panel with small holes by pressing the post against it." So simple, and so brilliant! I've already built more helping hands than I need... but I still like reading these because of this low-tech, common-sense kind of stuff. Thanbks for sharing!

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  • $10 DIY Flexible Soldering Helping Hand

    Good Idea!But what if you wanted to make it even simpler? No drilling with a huge drill bit, and no gluing! I found that if you remove the orange screw-in part of the hose completely and toss it, you can then remove the lowest blue segment and screw it directly into your base. Choose a screw (or bolt) with a head that is a bit larger than the hole in the bulb end of the segment. Not too big, otherwise when you snap the rest of the hose back onto this bulb, it won't fit well. I can't believe how simple this solution was! I'd seen so many of these tutorials and everyone was always having to come up with solutions for those damn threads -- Never again!

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  • Try springs from Clothes Pins, Mouse Traps, or even small Chip Bag Clamps.

    Try springs from Clothes Pins, Mouse Traps, or even small Chip Bag Clamps.

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  • Nice looking project! I believe you quoted this from a dubious source.: "Lead is used in the soldering process in the form of lead/silver filler metals. When heated, lead oxide fumes are formed. Excessive exposure to lead oxide fumes can result in lead poisoning. Symptoms include loss of appetite, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, constipation, headache, abdominal cramps, nervousness, and insomnia. Lead is absorbed through the mucous membranes of the lung, stomach, or intestines and then enters the bloodstream"--> The temperatures used in soldering are not sufficient to vaporize lead. There is ZERO lead in soldering fumes. Still harmful, but no lead.

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  • RobertC2 commented on ThomasVDD's instructable Solder Fume Extractor

    You are being overly alarmist.Lead does NOT vaporize at those temperatures. Therefore there is ZERO lead in the fumes. They are ALL from the flux. Still harmful but no lead. As long as the fumes are forcefully directed away from the face, his setup is perfectly fine for hobbyists in reasonably ventilated rooms.

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  • Nice warning labels! One silly question: Why waste paint on the whole cover when doing just the top would be sufficient to apply those stencils?

    Hi Gelfling6,All good, just a little friendly nitpicking... You already know this stuff but others may not be so experienced. #2. The black wires are not really GND. Ground is the chassis, through the thicker green wire on the MAINS connector. In the interest of clarity, I recommend using 0V or Black Wire when referring to it. #2A. I have read many instructables that say the load need only be on the rail with the highest current limit. No harm in using it on both, but if the maker has only one, he doesn't need to put off building this to wait for snail-mail from China. ;-)Cheers!

    Good question, chargerR!It depends on your PSU. Everything you need to know is on that label...Important: You cannot have all rails at max current. The label has the wattage, too. That and the voltages you will be using at any given time will let you calculate what you can expect from the unit you have.

    Yeah, but they often have something more useful, a second 12V rail!

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  • RobertC2 made the instructable Power Supply From Old PSU
    Power Supply From Old PSU

    No. Since they use the same ground you cannot do that. You can get up to 24v out of most of these by using -12v (blue wire) as negative, and +12v (yellow wire) as your positive. But, as stated in another comment, the max current will be the lesser of the two limits. So, around one amp, usually.There are many combinations to make different voltages... The black wires are not actually Ground. They are the 0 volt reference for the other voltages. The voltages you get are the differences between the two rails you use. Always use the higher voltage rail as the positive, and remember that your maximum current limit is the weaker of the two rails you are using. In the top right corner of this photo is a list of possible voltages. (That is the face plate for the one I made a couple years ago.)

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  • Ah, man! Now I wanna paint mine blue! Loved how simple it was!.I've used one of those lamp arms for a fume extractor fan, but never thought of using it for a third hand. That was inspired!Gotta get some of that plastic, looks like fun.

    pfred2, that's quite a magnifier you've got there! You must be doing surface-mount repairs by hand! Nice!I like the suspended platform, looks pretty versatile. Nice tool!

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  • oops... lets try that again...

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  • Many voltage combinations are possible. This was the face plate design for the one I made 2 yrs ago. At the top right of the photo you will find a list, and a very important notice about current rating. The current limit for combined voltages is the lowest of the two rails used.

    SiDawg, I believe part of your question was left unanswered.The last part about TWO (2) pairs of +/- red/black 12v wires... I think you were asking about 2 separate rails of 12v wires... the colors you mentioned were confusing given that in this device the 12v rails are yellow. One is Yellow and the other is Yellow w/a Black stripe (2nd 12v rail only on modern PSUs).The answer is no, you cannot use those two 12v rails together to make 24v because they share the same black wire. So, if you try what you said, it would simply short out one of the rails, in which case the rail is shut down and you will never get your 24v by using these rails in series. Sadly, using +12v(yellow) and -12v(blue), typically, will give you only about one amp... Theoretically, there is another way to get 24v at a r…

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    SiDawg, I believe part of your question was left unanswered.The last part about TWO (2) pairs of +/- red/black 12v wires... I think you were asking about 2 separate rails of 12v wires... the colors you mentioned were confusing given that in this device the 12v rails are yellow. One is Yellow and the other is Yellow w/a Black stripe (2nd 12v rail only on modern PSUs).The answer is no, you cannot use those two 12v rails together to make 24v because they share the same black wire. So, if you try what you said, it would simply short out one of the rails, in which case the rail is shut down and you will never get your 24v by using these rails in series. Sadly, using +12v(yellow) and -12v(blue), typically, will give you only about one amp... Theoretically, there is another way to get 24v at a reasonable current by combining those two 12v rails in parallel and feeding them into a boost converter. Because they are in parallel, they combine their current rating, and although some of that is lost in the step-up process of the boost converter, you are still getting reasonable current if the boost converter is rated for high amperage. Of course those are expensive...Alternatively, a cheaper solution is to just buy a 24v supply and get on with your life. ;-)

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  • RobertC2 commented on russ_hensel's instructable Tic Tak Power Supply

    Look at it this way: Your instinct took over and wanted to prevent a law suit... Nobody can sue you for a Tic TaK! ;-)

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  • Method 5: Wire-nuts + a little tape. If it's good enough for all the lamps and lighting fixtures in your house, it's probably good enough for most projects.Besides, who the hell is gonna be pulling on my wires?!

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  • Laptop Power Bank using extra power-tool batteries, without modifying the batteries so they can still power your tools. I love it when things are re-purposed smartly. Particularly when the thing can still be used for its original purpose if needed. Bravo! Note: If your laptop's charger uses the very common 5.5mm (OD) x 2.1mm (ID) DC plug, as mine does, you can avoid destroying that extra charger. Just use the wire from a same-sized generic wall charger. Test carefully for polarity.

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  • I had no idea why I was saving all those old, dull razors... now I know!

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