author
5Instructables52,000Views22CommentsGermany
I am a hobby photographer specialized in lightpainting and building tools for this. If you want to see more of my art check my FB, Instagram or Flickr page! You can find me under the same name there.

Achievements

10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
  • Diffusing LEDs Right

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly…

    see more »

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly at them the diffuser is lit everywhere but still shows hot spots. But it is not as prominent anyways so you can get away with it. But for my application I need something that is lit uniformly, so those profiles don't work at all. Thats what I talk about in step 7. To get an uniformly lit diffuser you either need to move the diffuser away further or apply double diffusion.But all this is really only important if you care about how the diffuser is lit. In a lighting situation where you don't see the diffuser there is no need to go to this length. Or if you shine the light on a wall for indirect lighting and the LED strip is hidden then there is no need for a diffuser at all, it will only reduce the brightness.

    View Instructable »
  • Diffusing LEDs Right

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly…

    see more »

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly at them the diffuser is lit everywhere but still shows hot spots. But it is not as prominent anyways so you can get away with it. But for my application I need something that is lit uniformly, so those profiles don't work at all. Thats what I talk about in step 7. To get an uniformly lit diffuser you either need to move the diffuser away further or apply double diffusion.But all this is really only important if you care about how the diffuser is lit. In a lighting situation where you don't see the diffuser there is no need to go to this length. Or if you shine the light on a wall for indirect lighting and the LED strip is hidden then there is no need for a diffuser at all, it will only reduce the brightness.

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly…

    see more »

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly at them the diffuser is lit everywhere but still shows hot spots. But it is not as prominent anyways so you can get away with it. But for my application I need something that is lit uniformly, so those profiles don't work at all. Thats what I talk about in step 7. To get an uniformly lit diffuser you either need to move the diffuser away further or apply double diffusion.But all this is really only important if you care about how the diffuser is lit. In a lighting situation where you don't see the diffuser there is no need to go to this length. Or if you shine the light on a wall for indirect lighting and the LED strip is hidden then there is no need for a diffuser at all, it will only reduce the brightness.

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly…

    see more »

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly at them the diffuser is lit everywhere but still shows hot spots. But it is not as prominent anyways so you can get away with it. But for my application I need something that is lit uniformly, so those profiles don't work at all. Thats what I talk about in step 7. To get an uniformly lit diffuser you either need to move the diffuser away further or apply double diffusion.But all this is really only important if you care about how the diffuser is lit. In a lighting situation where you don't see the diffuser there is no need to go to this length. Or if you shine the light on a wall for indirect lighting and the LED strip is hidden then there is no need for a diffuser at all, it will only reduce the brightness.

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly…

    see more »

    You experienced a problem that is quite common. There are no stock extrusions that do it quite right. All the normal ones are usually not deep enough and there are none that use a double diffusion. So either you can use the wide one (it doesn't matter, just gives more diffuser area) or build something yourself.It looks like you attach the LEDs so that they shine upwards against the ceiling and then let the light bounce out of the cove. In this case that cove and the walls sort of become your diffuser and the best way here would be to use no diffuser on the LEDs at all. Just put them in a profile either without any diffuser or with a completely clear one to protect the LEDs from dust. What I meant in step 5 is that for normal lighting applications the 17mm ones are ok. If you look directly at them the diffuser is lit everywhere but still shows hot spots. But it is not as prominent anyways so you can get away with it. But for my application I need something that is lit uniformly, so those profiles don't work at all. Thats what I talk about in step 7. To get an uniformly lit diffuser you either need to move the diffuser away further or apply double diffusion.But all this is really only important if you care about how the diffuser is lit. In a lighting situation where you don't see the diffuser there is no need to go to this length. Or if you shine the light on a wall for indirect lighting and the LED strip is hidden then there is no need for a diffuser at all, it will only reduce the brightness.

    View Instructable »
  • Diffusing LEDs Right

    Those are designed to be 3d printed. They are just some geometric shapes with a max dimension that I could still print on my printer. So the dimensions are not really connected to the light. The only thing that matters here is how far the diffuser is away from the LEDs. It was designed so the strip is double the distance away from the diffuser then the distance between each LED. That way the light from the LEDs intersect enough so that you don't see individual LEDs.It could have been smaller if I used double diffusion there like described in the other steps, but out of simplicity I designed these tools this way.

    View Instructable »
  • Both should work just fine, so it probably is more a question of aesthetics.There is special milky acrylic with the right amount of diffusion, usually called opal. These are made for such an application. Sandblasting diffusion can vary depending on grain size and time you blast it. So it can be more or less diffusion then the milky acrylic. But if you blast the inside the outer side will look more shiny like clear acrylic. On the other hand if you blast the outside you get extra diffusion because the clear surface reflects some light back and lets it bounce around inside. The outside will look rough.So all in all I guess it depends on what you want here.

    View Instructable »
  • Wouldn't help much. There is so much other stuff in it that would only be in the way, was complete communication using bluetooth to remote control the thing and more stuff. The parts I posted are essentially those that control the movement. Just put the outputs on the right pins of the controllers and call the function, should work then. If it doesn't there is most likely an issue with the wiring. Can put an LED on the step output and increase the delay time to check if signal is send to the driver.

    View Instructable »
  • Would have to dig into backups to find it, this was a long time ago. But I used A4988 stepper drivers. Just need to set them to the correct microstepping, then put the direction pin on high or low to set direction and pulse the step pin. Should be quite easy. There is also a good stepper library that is easy to use, check out the libraries on arduino homepage.

    Well found some of the code, but it is as I described above. Those stepper drivers have some pins to set microstep mode, one for direction and one to do the steps. Stepp code was this:int turnStep = A0;int turnDir = A1;int turnSpeed = 12;void turnByVal(int xw){ boolean posMove = xw >0; if (xw >0) { digitalWrite(turnDir, HIGH); } else { digitalWrite(turnDir, LOW); } for (int x=0;x<abs(xw);x++){ digitalWrite(turnStep, HIGH); //delay(1); digitalWrite(turnStep, LOW); delay(turnSpeed); }}Setting the microsteps this:int enableStepperPin = 2;int m1Pin = 3;int m2Pin = 4;int m3Pin = 5;void setStepSize(int stepSize) { switch(stepSize) { case 1: { // Full Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m2Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m3Pin, LOW); …

    see more »

    Well found some of the code, but it is as I described above. Those stepper drivers have some pins to set microstep mode, one for direction and one to do the steps. Stepp code was this:int turnStep = A0;int turnDir = A1;int turnSpeed = 12;void turnByVal(int xw){ boolean posMove = xw >0; if (xw >0) { digitalWrite(turnDir, HIGH); } else { digitalWrite(turnDir, LOW); } for (int x=0;x<abs(xw);x++){ digitalWrite(turnStep, HIGH); //delay(1); digitalWrite(turnStep, LOW); delay(turnSpeed); }}Setting the microsteps this:int enableStepperPin = 2;int m1Pin = 3;int m2Pin = 4;int m3Pin = 5;void setStepSize(int stepSize) { switch(stepSize) { case 1: { // Full Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m2Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m3Pin, LOW); break; } case 2: { // Half Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, HIGH); digitalWrite(m2Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m3Pin, LOW); break; } case 3: { // 1/4 Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m2Pin, HIGH); digitalWrite(m3Pin, LOW); break; } case 4: { // 1/8 Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, HIGH); digitalWrite(m2Pin, HIGH); digitalWrite(m3Pin, LOW); break; } case 5: { // 1/16 Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m2Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m3Pin, HIGH); break; } case 6: { // 1/32 Step digitalWrite(m1Pin, HIGH); digitalWrite(m2Pin, LOW); digitalWrite(m3Pin, HIGH); break; } }}Just put the relevant outputs on the pins of the driver and should work.

    View Instructable »
  • Real good instructable. Well explained and great details.Just wanted to add casein ist completely safe but "because it is made from milk" is not the best reasoning. You can extract pretty dangerous substances from food ingediences (poison/acid from almonds, drug/poison from nutmeg), so just because something is made from safe substances does not mean the result is too. (works the other way too)

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks, it has a lot of potential.

    View Instructable »
  • Continuous rotation servos are never precise. You can't tell them to go to a specific point/angle. You can just set the turn speed in one or the other direction. Once you mod a servo to have continuous rotation you disable the internal decoder and loose the ability to set a precise angle on them.The only servos that exist with more then 180° rotation are some servos used in model boats for the anchors. Those can have 2-5x360° rotation. But they are not really strong and not really precise and more, because you just spread the control range from 180° to a bigger angle so difference between each control step gets larger.

    View Instructable »
  • Servos usually only have 180° working area. Would work great, my first experiments were with those. But wanted to have more then the 180°. And once you modify them to have full 360° you loose the precision control and need to add a decoder or something like that to know where the arm currently is.

    View Instructable »
  • Was not able to get a full orb. What you see up there is the maximum I could get at the bottom. Partly because arm was longer then the height of the robot tower. Could have been better designed, but I wanted the longer arm. Speed was an issue, think that orb there took 5 minutes. Well it was programmed to be controllable using serial communication over bluetooth, that was one part that took some speed. Other was that I had not developed a proper code at that time. Would have been better to work with acceleration to get some more speed. Or add a gear box.

    Haha yes, hand made ones are sometimes only 180° depending on the type. Several years light painting experience. ;)I used one of those bearings that go under furniture. Around 30cm diameter with a hole in the middle that was perfect for the stepper. Added quite some stability.

    View Instructable »
  • It is normal wadding used in teddy bears and such stuff. Don't think it is fire safe but if you put an led strip in an aluminium enclosure they will never get warm enough to char the wadding.Usually getting those enclosures on ebay, many sell them here in different shapes and colors. Depends on where you live I guess.

    View Instructable »
  • Nice build. Check out my diffusion instructable if you want to get rid of the lines and get a continuous light bar ;)I bet some people in the lightpainter community would also love to read it. If you have facebook check out the "Light-Painting International" or "Light Painting World Alliance" group and share it there!

    View Instructable »
  • RyusLightworks's instructable Diffusing LEDs Right's weekly stats:
    • Diffusing LEDs Right
      1,716 views
      35 favorites
      0 comments
    • Solder Connector to Chasing EL Wires
      803 views
      15 favorites
      0 comments
    • Interval Exposure Light Painting
      4,004 views
      82 favorites
      8 comments
  • RyusLightworks followed science and leds channel
  • Thanks.Yes it opens up many interesting effects. You can give any light source a "strobe" effect even if it would not be possible for that light source (like fire).

    There is currently no photography contest, otherwise I would have entered it there too ;)

    View Instructable »