author

adaviel

179
Inbox View Profile
24Instructables418,550Views42Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Achievements

10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Gardening Contest 2017
Contest Winner Third Prize in the Gardening Contest 2017
  • adaviel's instructable Solid Wood Suspended Lightbar's weekly stats:
    • Solid Wood Suspended Lightbar
      245 views
      6 favorites
      0 comments
  • adaviel's instructable Copper Pipe Chandelier's weekly stats:
    • Copper Pipe Chandelier
      120 views
      2 favorites
      1 comments
  • adaviel's instructable Electric Mini Sawmill's weekly stats:
    • Electric Mini Sawmill
      154 views
      1 favorites
      5 comments
  • adaviel commented on adaviel's instructable Electric Mini Sawmill
    Electric Mini Sawmill

    I've added a video. It's using the standard chain that came with the saw. It was a fairly inexpensive saw; I'm not sure if a rip chain is available. It might be a good idea.Re. assembly, it was built with leftover materials, originally with no intention to write an instructable, so there are no photos. I assume that anyone capable of building it is capable of figuring out how. I'm not even sure it's the best way to do it. If you have specific questions I'm happy to answer.

    View Instructable »
  • Rooftop Grid-tied Solar Panels With Microinverters

    Sorry, I don't recall. I had all the parts for both projects 4 years apart from Amray Solar in Burnaby. They arrived in unmarked bags. The shingle mounts were on the earlier project.

    The PVwatts online calculator I mentioned does that, at least the average amount of sun thing. For calculating load averages, I wanted to just say "same as my current house", but as I already had electric service at my new location with very low usage during construction (power tools and trailer lighting, basically), my utility wanted more. So yes, I made a full spreadsheet based on things like wall areas, R-values, projected heat-pump efficiency, electric vehicle mileage and a bunch of other guesses to come up with a figure not dissimilar to what I'd started with. I'm not sure how widespread this requirement is - with grid-tie, any amount of power is a win, representing electricity not purchased. They just wanted me not to produce more annually than I was going to use, while wh…

    see more »

    The PVwatts online calculator I mentioned does that, at least the average amount of sun thing. For calculating load averages, I wanted to just say "same as my current house", but as I already had electric service at my new location with very low usage during construction (power tools and trailer lighting, basically), my utility wanted more. So yes, I made a full spreadsheet based on things like wall areas, R-values, projected heat-pump efficiency, electric vehicle mileage and a bunch of other guesses to come up with a figure not dissimilar to what I'd started with. I'm not sure how widespread this requirement is - with grid-tie, any amount of power is a win, representing electricity not purchased. They just wanted me not to produce more annually than I was going to use, while when I had the funds I decided to install the maximum I could.

    View Instructable »
    • Rooftop Grid-tied Solar Panels With Microinverters
      9,256 views
      181 favorites
      23 comments
  • Rooftop Grid-tied Solar Panels With Microinverters

    I sourced the cells (in the form of pre-assembled panels), along with everything else, from a local supplier Amray Solar in Burnaby BC (Canada). They quoted me $248 CAD for VSUN 310W panels, but I think they actually shipped Canadian Solar 300W for the same price. Their product lineup keeps changing as they find alternate suppliers. My total costs were something like $23,000 CAD for 15.5kW of power.At one point I calculated the ROI as 4% per year, which is better than I'd get from a savings account but not as good as my investment portfolio. But electricity prices will rise; my utility has stated as much.Another commenter has stated that some jurisdictions won't let you use used panels for grid-tie, though elsewhere I have read that they can be obtained quite cheaply. My new panels repres…

    see more »

    I sourced the cells (in the form of pre-assembled panels), along with everything else, from a local supplier Amray Solar in Burnaby BC (Canada). They quoted me $248 CAD for VSUN 310W panels, but I think they actually shipped Canadian Solar 300W for the same price. Their product lineup keeps changing as they find alternate suppliers. My total costs were something like $23,000 CAD for 15.5kW of power.At one point I calculated the ROI as 4% per year, which is better than I'd get from a savings account but not as good as my investment portfolio. But electricity prices will rise; my utility has stated as much.Another commenter has stated that some jurisdictions won't let you use used panels for grid-tie, though elsewhere I have read that they can be obtained quite cheaply. My new panels represented about 50% of total materials costs, the rest being split between microinverters and mounting hardware. It is definitely worth using purpose-built rails in time savings alone, even if a planning authority would let you use something else.

    The plastic bag was temporary just while they were not yet connected, to stop any rain getting onto the connector pins

    Shorting the panel would dissipate all its power internally. It's probably safe to do that - they quote a short-circuit current - but I'm not certain. I mentioned it as a safety issue just in case someone might cut the cables and leave exposed ends. The only time I actually covered panels was when I found I'd lost my paper map, my computer drawing turned out to be incomplete, and I wanted to double-check which panel was on which inverter input.

    I added the step for building permit. I'd mentioned planning permission.I'm wondering why anyone cares about used panels. The interface to the grid is the microinverter, which quite reasonably the utility would want to be certified. The panel is just a random power source; my utility didn't ask about those at all.

    View Instructable »
  • Landing Craft for a Motorcycle

    I've never tried. My last foreign trip (to the US) was some years before I bought the bike.From my experiences driving to foreign countries (France, US, Italy ...) the authorities have never asked me for documents for the vehicle, it's just myself. I'm fairly obviously just visiting (or they ask that). From a book I read by a much more adventurous biker, in some countries in e.g. Africa they suspect you might be trying to import the bike to sell it and demand that you have a carnet (a bond of some kind).

    View Instructable »
  • Landing Craft for a Motorcycle

    I have a 32 foot sailboat. I park the bike against the shrouds and secure it with a few bits of rope and some anti-chafe gear - an old bit of hose around the shroud for one. It's slipped on occasion and my old bike got a patch of paint worn off the tank. I wrap the bike in a tarpaulin to keep spray off, but if it's calm I won't bother. I often remove the mirrors as they can get caught on the jib sheet.My DR200 was stolen, the photo is my new Zero; slightly heavier with both batteries. I haven't tried it on the cat yet. I can unclip a section of railing cable on the port side and also get the bike ashore at a dock down a ramp.

    View Instructable »
  • adaviel's instructable Personal Heat Exchanger's weekly stats:
    • Personal Heat Exchanger
      520 views
      5 favorites
      1 comments
  • The first time I tried, I think I rigged a line to the bike in case I dropped it. But mostly I just re-set the mooring lines so that the bow overlaps the dock slightly, so there is no chance of the bike going in the water. I've only misjudged it once, I think, but was able to hold the bike upright and lift it back on the ramp.The Suzuki was stolen in September and I now have a Zero electric. That will be fun - totally different torque characteristics and no clutch.My most insane trip was getting it onto a small island by way of a tiny island - I brought the boat alongside the rocks at high tide with a log as a buffer, and had a four-foot gap to cross. Then I had to wait for the tide to go out to ride the bike to the big island. That was before I made the catamaran.

    It got a bit of rust on the handlebars where the ropes rubbed it, but otherwise not much. I wrap it in a tarpaulin if the sea's choppy and there's much spray.

    Messed up my reply with the picture. It was supposed to be here in reply to yours.

    View Instructable »
  • adaviel's entry Low-cost Greenhouse is a winner in the Gardening Contest 2017 contest
  • adaviel's entry Low-cost Greenhouse is a finalist in the Gardening Contest 2017 contest
    • Multi-Input Electric Vehicle Charging Station
      774 views
      18 favorites
      0 comments
  • Re. fibreglass, I don't know. I assume any other insulating material would work. I used GRP because I'm familiar with it. I understand about VOCs; one epoxy paint gave me a blinding headache so I made a positive-pressure respirator.The issue with the cells is minimum bending radius. All you need to do is mount them on a light stiff board (hence the honeycomb) and cover with a transparent waterproof material. It may be that acrylic would work, sealed with silicone sealant and secured with bolts. My solar kits suggest glass panels, which for me was too heavy and too fragile.I have since seen commercial panels for RVs becoming lighter and cheaper. Considering the work that is required for home assembly, I might just consider buying those for my sailboat project (still on hold).

    View Instructable »
  • adaviel's instructable Cargo Cover for Nissan Leaf's weekly stats:
    • Cargo Cover for Nissan Leaf
      68 views
      0 favorites
      0 comments
  • Good guestions. I think I used 2 layers of 4oz E-glass cloth from my local goindustrial store for the panel, then 1 layer of 2.5oz cloth to cover the PV cells. I'm not 100% sure.I'm not sure about the light absorbtion. There is about a 200% variation in open-voltage output of the cells I bought, so to get a good answer I'd have to carefully characterize a particular cell then measure it again after encapsulation. I did some crude measurements like that but forget the answer, beyond "it worked". The potting resin is completely transparent to visible light, and I don't think that well-wetted glass absorbs much light. I'd assume it would be at least as good as the epoxy some commercial panel manufacturers use. Years ago I made a motorcycle headlight lens with glass mat, which was g…

    see more »

    Good guestions. I think I used 2 layers of 4oz E-glass cloth from my local goindustrial store for the panel, then 1 layer of 2.5oz cloth to cover the PV cells. I'm not 100% sure.I'm not sure about the light absorbtion. There is about a 200% variation in open-voltage output of the cells I bought, so to get a good answer I'd have to carefully characterize a particular cell then measure it again after encapsulation. I did some crude measurements like that but forget the answer, beyond "it worked". The potting resin is completely transparent to visible light, and I don't think that well-wetted glass absorbs much light. I'd assume it would be at least as good as the epoxy some commercial panel manufacturers use. Years ago I made a motorcycle headlight lens with glass mat, which was good enough not to get me pulled over, and the thinner cloth is better than that.

    View Instructable »