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adaviel

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Gardening Contest 2017
Contest Winner Third Prize in the Gardening Contest 2017
  • Landing Craft for a Motorcycle

    I've never tried. My last foreign trip (to the US) was some years before I bought the bike.From my experiences driving to foreign countries (France, US, Italy ...) the authorities have never asked me for documents for the vehicle, it's just myself. I'm fairly obviously just visiting (or they ask that). From a book I read by a much more adventurous biker, in some countries in e.g. Africa they suspect you might be trying to import the bike to sell it and demand that you have a carnet (a bond of some kind).

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  • Landing Craft for a Motorcycle

    I have a 32 foot sailboat. I park the bike against the shrouds and secure it with a few bits of rope and some anti-chafe gear - an old bit of hose around the shroud for one. It's slipped on occasion and my old bike got a patch of paint worn off the tank. I wrap the bike in a tarpaulin to keep spray off, but if it's calm I won't bother. I often remove the mirrors as they can get caught on the jib sheet.My DR200 was stolen, the photo is my new Zero; slightly heavier with both batteries. I haven't tried it on the cat yet. I can unclip a section of railing cable on the port side and also get the bike ashore at a dock down a ramp.

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  • adaviel's instructable Personal Heat Exchanger's weekly stats:
    • Personal Heat Exchanger
      520 views
      5 favorites
      1 comments
  • The first time I tried, I think I rigged a line to the bike in case I dropped it. But mostly I just re-set the mooring lines so that the bow overlaps the dock slightly, so there is no chance of the bike going in the water. I've only misjudged it once, I think, but was able to hold the bike upright and lift it back on the ramp.The Suzuki was stolen in September and I now have a Zero electric. That will be fun - totally different torque characteristics and no clutch.My most insane trip was getting it onto a small island by way of a tiny island - I brought the boat alongside the rocks at high tide with a log as a buffer, and had a four-foot gap to cross. Then I had to wait for the tide to go out to ride the bike to the big island. That was before I made the catamaran.

    It got a bit of rust on the handlebars where the ropes rubbed it, but otherwise not much. I wrap it in a tarpaulin if the sea's choppy and there's much spray.

    Messed up my reply with the picture. It was supposed to be here in reply to yours.

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  • adaviel's entry Low-cost Greenhouse is a winner in the Gardening Contest 2017 contest
  • adaviel's entry Low-cost Greenhouse is a finalist in the Gardening Contest 2017 contest
    • Multi-Input Electric Vehicle Charging Station
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      18 favorites
      0 comments
  • Re. fibreglass, I don't know. I assume any other insulating material would work. I used GRP because I'm familiar with it. I understand about VOCs; one epoxy paint gave me a blinding headache so I made a positive-pressure respirator.The issue with the cells is minimum bending radius. All you need to do is mount them on a light stiff board (hence the honeycomb) and cover with a transparent waterproof material. It may be that acrylic would work, sealed with silicone sealant and secured with bolts. My solar kits suggest glass panels, which for me was too heavy and too fragile.I have since seen commercial panels for RVs becoming lighter and cheaper. Considering the work that is required for home assembly, I might just consider buying those for my sailboat project (still on hold).

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  • adaviel's instructable Cargo Cover for Nissan Leaf's weekly stats:
    • Cargo Cover for Nissan Leaf
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  • Good guestions. I think I used 2 layers of 4oz E-glass cloth from my local goindustrial store for the panel, then 1 layer of 2.5oz cloth to cover the PV cells. I'm not 100% sure.I'm not sure about the light absorbtion. There is about a 200% variation in open-voltage output of the cells I bought, so to get a good answer I'd have to carefully characterize a particular cell then measure it again after encapsulation. I did some crude measurements like that but forget the answer, beyond "it worked". The potting resin is completely transparent to visible light, and I don't think that well-wetted glass absorbs much light. I'd assume it would be at least as good as the epoxy some commercial panel manufacturers use. Years ago I made a motorcycle headlight lens with glass mat, which was g…

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    Good guestions. I think I used 2 layers of 4oz E-glass cloth from my local goindustrial store for the panel, then 1 layer of 2.5oz cloth to cover the PV cells. I'm not 100% sure.I'm not sure about the light absorbtion. There is about a 200% variation in open-voltage output of the cells I bought, so to get a good answer I'd have to carefully characterize a particular cell then measure it again after encapsulation. I did some crude measurements like that but forget the answer, beyond "it worked". The potting resin is completely transparent to visible light, and I don't think that well-wetted glass absorbs much light. I'd assume it would be at least as good as the epoxy some commercial panel manufacturers use. Years ago I made a motorcycle headlight lens with glass mat, which was good enough not to get me pulled over, and the thinner cloth is better than that.

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