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crazypj

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  • Homemade 3 in 1 CNC (Router, 3D Printer & Laser Engraver)

    I'm pretty sure this is the most detailed CNC build I've seen, particularly as you included all your trials and tribulations. For the reverse EMF, would it be possible to user a capacitor and diodes to send reverse EMF to ground side? (or maybe just diode/zener diodes?) My thinking on adding a capacitor would be to limit induced spikes, similar to inside a peak voltage adapter. I'm not familiar with stepper motor EMF but have a lot of experience on motorcycle ignition systems where a 320V reverse EMF is common on a 12v primary winding ignition system (with around 35,000v or more secondary output)

    Black and Orange, KTM motorcycles (I'm not a Harley davidson person even if they use black and orange racing colours)

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  • Tee Slot Drill Press Clamps, Easy and Quick

    I've got a couple of those clamps but my drill table has 'proper' T slots. so I use T nuts.(slot bottom is 'closed' and doesn't go all the way through) That is a simple solution though , wish I had thought of it as it looks much easier than what I did

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  • crazypj commented on 4DIYers's instructable How to Grease a Bearing
    How to Grease a Bearing

    That's the way I've always done wheel bearing but, I only found out a few weeks ago it's wrong. Bearings are designed to have about 25% grease, over-packing will make them less efficient. Next set I do I'll try it and see if there is any difference in longevity (or better mpg?)

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  • How to Make Faces on Your Trees in 4 Easy Steps

    I'm in Florida, same problem.

    Not sure if paper mache would hold too much water and could cause tree to rot?Using basically 'mud' it should wash off relatively quickly without causing permanebt damage?

    Got to agree with you, upvoted your comment

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  • Home Oven Steel Tempering/Coloring

    Most 'self cleaning' ovens will get to around 800f. They don't really clean themselves but carbonise everything so it's easier to 'sweep' or vacuum out the bits when it cools downI found specs online for ours. You may need actual model number to get all details

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  • Better Xacto Knife Handles

    I don't have a 3D printer and it's pretty doubtful I'll ever have one? (never say never -LOL)Anyway, I still think it's a great idea to have blade fixed at a 'better' more user friendly angle.I'm almost certain I can make something very similar in stainless steel, it will take rather a lot longer than printing though. ;o)

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  • Wet Molded Credit Card Wallet

    It's a good 'structable' very interesting to see a professional (or semi-professional?) at work.It shows you don't need a lot of tools but you do need a fair amount of skill and practice.I've voted for it.

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  • crazypj commented on luklev's instructable DC and Stepper Motor Tester
    DC and Stepper Motor Tester

    I rarely vote for anything involving 3D printing but seeing your sketches for circuits was kinda nice. Over-reliance on computers takes something away in my opinion. 'Old school' method with sheets of paper and no 'library' of parts suits my Luddite style. ;o)

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  • crazypj commented on imwoody36's instructable Prius Hot Rod
    Prius Hot Rod

    I wasn't going to vote for this but after reading through the 'stuctable' decided it was worth voting for. Anyone who does something this crazy deserves a vote.

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  • crazypj commented on rtkerth's instructable EZGO Sport
    EZGO Sport

    Love the re-use of something like this.Probably the only one I'll vote for

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  • crazypj commented on DIY KING 00's instructable DIY Wind Generator
    DIY Wind Generator

    I know very little about aerodynamics but wouldn't the blades work better if the 'outside' was facing the wind?

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  • crazypj commented on CHARLESCRANFORD's instructable Canoe Cart
    Canoe Cart

    Impressed by the ingeniousness of the simplicity. You could probably leave rear mount permanently attached and just tow it upside down? It would mean making a more complicated front tow bar though?

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  • Cheap DADO Stack That Works and Is 'realitively' Safe for a Cheap Table Saw

    Link doesn't work for me, plus, I don't think it was available 2 years ago? BTW, did you mean HF? I'm not familiar with HB

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  • Slippery When Wet Skateboard

    I've never skateboarded but I think my brother would like it even though he's now a director ;o)

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  • crazypj commented on jjohnson203's instructable Wall Map Mural
    Wall Map Mural

    Looks like your children enjoyed 'helping out' :o)

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  • crazypj commented on v1nce_nt's instructable The Wooden Globe
    The Wooden Globe

    Nice globe, I thought it would be heavier than <2.5 Kg though. LOL

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  • Etch a Circuit Board With Kitchen Supplies

    A few years ago I wanted to experiment with 'super (ultra?) capacitors to make a rechargeable 16v power bank. If circuit isn't too complicated you can use a Sharpie and just draw it directly onto copper clad board.. May need to make lines a little wider and go over them a couple of times but it actually works well and doesn't require access to a lazer printer. AS far as I recall I used same set of chemicals, although I can't remember if I added table salt?

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  • crazypj commented on F_A_B_A_S's instructable Tenor Ukelele

    I don't play any instruments and don't know anyone who could use this but I think you give enough information that I could build it if I wanted to. Using pretty much minimal tools, anyone could build this. I'm goving it top marks in woodworking contest

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  • Learned something, belt sander is equivalent of ' grinder and paint makes me welder I aunt' LOL Don't remember hearing 'additive joinery' before either. I'm voting for it and may even make something similar in next few months as wife like the look of 'butcher block' at present (and antique distressed -roll eyes smiley LOL)

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  • crazypj commented on nerdyKat's instructable PSU Wire Choker

    I'm not a jewelry person but I must admit the wire choker does look good on you. Clever idea

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  • crazypj commented on chaskaduo's forum topic Pictures disappeared

    Mozilla messed up Firefox last week so that could be a problem? It's in the process of being fixed or may already be fixed?. If your using a different browser I don't know what to tell you.

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  • I prefer to use ordinary hand soap, it seems easier to heat from the back until soap goes dark brown, to black you can even use kitchen stove to do it that way. little more clean up but easier than using Oxy/DA or propane torch. All you need are pliers and a bit of care

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  • What a great Instructable, re-cycled parts, re-purposed stuff lot of links to keep you busy and maybe a bit safer. seems to have all the information and details anyone would need to build it. I have no immediate use for a large turntable but as you provide several alternative uses. I'm sure I can think of something. I like it and have voted for it

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      • Fairy-tale Style Bench With Chainsaw
      • Improved Stove Top Fan (from Junk)
      • Chainsaw Mill Build, Use & Tips N Tricks
  • I think you need to re-check your rectifier connections and make sure you don't have something in backwards or an input connected to an AC? Did you check alternator output voltage? (AC volts) I would expect 40~60VAC @2,000rpm. I've seen a Honda C90 put out almost 100 volts AC, (no load) at max rpm (on a 6v circuit). Customer complaint was 'it's blowing bulbs'

    On any Honda motorcycle, plain black wire is always switched power (battery voltage) When it's on R/R, its the signal voltage to tell R/R battery needs charging (or is overcharging)

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  • I thinkl having the tach up where you can see it is a great idea. Like the way you figured out a mounting solution. I'll vote for it ;o)

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  • crazypj commented on AnandM54's instructable PAPER JENGA

    As soon as I realised it was paper mache being made it all became clear. I remember making paper mache puppets in school with old newspapers and wallpaper paste 50+yrs ago. I'm voting for it

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  • That's a really neat idea, I bought a couple of scrub brushes that would work great plus, I have no other use for them. Thanks for posting

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  • Seems that as I get older I'm looking at handmade stuff more oft5en and turning totally away from Iot, lazer this, 3D that and CNC other. I doubt I'll ever learn to crochet or make one of these but it is dead cute.

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  • Not everyone will be lucky enough to find a free Powerwheels but they do turn up sometimes. My stepdaughter found one for her son when he was about 8~9months old, I stored it and kept battery charged until he was closer to 18 months and could use it. LOL at pictures of baby 'trying it out' I'll vote for it

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  • Nice and easy to do, no Arduino or Pi, no CNC, no Lazer cutters ao 3D printing. I always vote for stuff like this that will keep kids amused (and adults)

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  • crazypj commented on Creatiedroom's instructable Wooden Toy Fire Truck

    No CNC, not lazers, no 3D printing. What a great instructable. It could all be done with handtools only, I'm voting for it.

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  • I think this is the most detailed Instructable I've ever seen. Usually I ignore anything that says '3D Printer' but I'm glad I went all the way through this one. I have no use for a turbo jet enginwe but I'm sure I could make one if needed by downloading all the PDF files and find someone with a £D printer to make the other parts. Very Very impressive work

    I think thats why the 'heavy' blade fell off' in the video? It's still impressive to get over 24,000rpm from what is basically scrap. I have enough stainless sheet to make the parts, left over from a project I did probably 35 yrs ago. Was pretty cheap then for a piece 2ftx2ft (plus IU saved leftover 3/32" copper sheet I bought in 1982) stuff is out there as long as you don't follow 'minimalist' advice and throw everything away every 3~6 months

    I was thinking the exact same thing ;o)

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  • does this mean the shift register you used actually has 8 x 8 x 9 combinations?

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  • I use diesel, it's cheaper than kerosene here. It has advantaghes over various other solvents as it contains cleaners and corrosion inhibitors. 'Leightweight' motorcycle chain lube works better than most bicycle chain lube in my opinion and is cheaper than the bicycle dedicated formula's. As a motorcycle technician for 40+ yrs I've read various tests of chain lubes for many years. WD40 is worthless as chain lube, Teflon based are short term, low pressure on motorcycles. I like PJ1 for bicycles, I find it washes off too easy and needs re-applying around 20~100 miles on motorcycles but works great on push-bikes for weeks at a time, plus, it dries on surface so doesnt attract dirt. Only downside with motorcycle chain lubes, they pretty much all require a 'frying time' but this is alsocommon…

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    I use diesel, it's cheaper than kerosene here. It has advantaghes over various other solvents as it contains cleaners and corrosion inhibitors. 'Leightweight' motorcycle chain lube works better than most bicycle chain lube in my opinion and is cheaper than the bicycle dedicated formula's. As a motorcycle technician for 40+ yrs I've read various tests of chain lubes for many years. WD40 is worthless as chain lube, Teflon based are short term, low pressure on motorcycles. I like PJ1 for bicycles, I find it washes off too easy and needs re-applying around 20~100 miles on motorcycles but works great on push-bikes for weeks at a time, plus, it dries on surface so doesnt attract dirt. Only downside with motorcycle chain lubes, they pretty much all require a 'frying time' but this is alsocommon with dedicated bicycle lubes

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  • Nope, just not to be added to a 'Trade School' curriculum or similar. Ifr you want to link it to a site that isn't a problem

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  • crazypj commented on rog8811's instructable Emergency Air Filter

    You can buy'bulk' filter foam for motocross bikes, may be a better optionas foam filter never last more than a couple of years. Proper foam filter oil will trap more fine particles and also extends life of filter (to around 6 yrs in my experience if you don't have to wash it every weekend) K&N is a better option if you intend keeping Marlin for a while, I'm using some I aquired 'second hand' (used) in 1985

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  • If you don't have a heavy duty / professional weedwhacker the torque from blade will break 3/16" drive cable (I tried it and broke it) You need at least 1/4" drive cable between power head and blade

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  • I found those binding screws sold as 'Chigago screws' no idea why the name though.

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  • crazypj followed arduino channel
  • Hummm.... That IS a two stroke cylinder. The process is exactly the same for two or four stroke but four stroke cylinders are easier as you don't have ports. Designing two stroke expansion chambers Is relatively easy, but, you need to make several for testing plus, correctly done it will amplify exhaust note so silencing becomes difficult without destroying the power you've obtained. At one time, several (most?) manufactures actually provided information on building tuned pipes (at least I know Kawasaki and Suzuki did) In the service manual for T305 there is a diagram of pipe.A lot depends on the engine your building for and the type of use. No point having a 500rpm power band on an MX bike as it would be almost unrideable but on a drag bike it's all you need

    Just realised what your asking (was in a rush this morning) You want set up with degree wheel to measure port opening and closing points, simple enough, just fit degree wheel to crank end and set to TDC=zero. You can also do it by measuring cylinder then use trigonometry but that is way more difficult as you need to take con-rod length and angle into account.

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  • crazypj commented on NikilH's instructable Poor Man's Buffing Wheel

    I didn't think Dremel would have enough torque to polish anything, even with a small buffing wheel but I guess I'm wrong. It would be very handy for plastics as you have to keep very light touch or they will melt/smear. I'm going to scale it up for a full sized buffer (minimum 8" dia) Will probably need a few pairs of jeans though

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  • crazypj commented on tomatoskins's instructable Table Saw Jointer

    Oh, forgot to mention, the blade that came with saw is actually very good, I've taken a 3/16" cut down side of 'pallet wood' boards an gotten a 1/16" 'veneer' with a smooth surface finish, better than some planers or joiners as multi tooth blade taking a tiny cut doesn't set up same type of vibration compared to knives on a 3" circle

    This will work even on a cheap 'contractor' type saw. Even if blade can't be set exactly 90 degrees, (I haven't 'got inside' my HF saw yet) flip board and angles will match perfectly. Makes glue up slightly more difficult but I already figured out clamping boards flat.

    Because I trained as a precision machinist I have various 123 blocks, parallels, etc so I use them in combination to get blade and fence parallel. Probably overkill setting to 0.001" but I find it quick and easy

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  • It's a lot easier to get a hole saw to cut aluminium if you have a couple of 3mm~1/8" holes drilled all the way through. After first 'marking' cut is made you have layout for circle use it to line up small drill. I've found belts slip on most drill presses using hole saw on even 1/4" plate plus, the hole saw can bind as things heat up.

    Is aluminium robust enough for the dies? 7075 is harder than 6061 but unless hard anodized will still be pretty softI would think they will wear very quickly and have a series of flats if used with steel tube?

    Generally, no. your better off bending then 'barrel' plating a batchChrome plating will probably flake off on inside of bend and crack on outside radius Chrome doesn't like being compressed or stretched

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  • I like the idea you mention just about all the pitfalls before starting plus it 'reads well' ;o)I voted for you in Arduino competition

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  • Could the wheels have been made slightly wider and act like a 'ducted propeller?

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  • I like the idea of recording 'exact' mileage of vehicle. It's always interesting to see just how far you can go. One day I'll open up truck instrument panel as I know it's about 13% 'slow' since I fitted different wheels and tyres and shows 'only' 106,000 miles at present when it should be showing around 110~112,000 (I didn't fit 'new' wheels until 50~60,000 (will have to check, I have it in truck records)

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  • Not my tip but something Herm Narcissco (sp?) of Dime City Cycles does to make things simpler plus way less chance of damage. Fit a large hose clamp around stainless band before prying open., it prevents you going too far or screwdriver slipping and gouging exterior. Personally I found it an advantage to run some masking tape around band first as hose clamp can cause marks

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  • The angle and length of handle will (should) vary according to your saw table height, your height and hand width. Find a handle you like the feel of and copy it as it's much easier than trying to make one from scratch

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  • have you made one yet or is it just a concept with renerings?

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    • Cheap DADO Stack That Works and Is 'realitively' Safe for a Cheap Table Saw
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      14 comments
  • Forgot to add, I find his commentary absolutely hilarious as well, maybe it's a Canadian/British commonwealth thing? KYDIAV ;o)

    I didn't know AvE had done a test on those (he has done an awful lot of video's under different names) Anyway, great hack, I'm going to do it as soon as I get caught up with the gazillion other things I have to do( or maybe sooner as battery life sucks. I converted one set to use ordinary AA battery and used a switch but that ended up as a DRO on mini lathe tailstock

    I use a 0.0001mm mechanical micrometer when I need really accurate

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  • I'll have to check out the Freud spacers. CD's are a bad idea as they are polycarbonate and will allow 'slippage' plus need to be 'crazy tight' but for relatively shallow slots can work. Using 24t blades means you could have a minimal overlap to prevent 'corrugations' at base of cut but as you found out, sharp chisel works fine.

    Yep, when an idea's time has come it will happen. It's not the first time I've heard this, about 25~30 yrs ago I 'invented' a 'pulley' to reduce friction on bicycle dérailleur gear change, less than a month later a 'commercial' version was being previewed in cycling magazines. Wasn't as 'good' as mine tough as it was only available in a 90 degree 'bend' I made various angles as POC but 90 and 120 were the only ones I used. They worked really well (and still do when cleaned and lubed) but as there was already something on the market I never went any further with idea

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  • Second dealership I worked in was Suzuki-BMW-Vespa so I know exactly which one you mean. I was there before the 'Flying Bricks' (K series) came out, good motor , uber reliable (200,000+ miles) R series were always 'softer' tuned but for long distance riding, unbeatable.

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  • Hi, The AMMCO sets I have do give some idea of stone selection and speed/rpm for different sizes but doubtful the cheaper sets give enough advice?What are you trying to do? If you want to get cylinders to first oversize for new pistons it's best to start with a coarse grit stone, 80~100 if available. Hone to within 0.002" then switch to a 240 or 280 grit. You can either buy a 320~400 grit 'FlexHone' or use 400~600 grit for finishing, if your building a semi race motor or turbo/supercharged I would use 600 grit rigid hone as it will give a finer smoother surface but takes MUCH longer than the 'production' machine shops methods which is why it isn't used very often nowadays.

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  • The Lisle hone is almost exactly the same as Sunne which works well easy to use and VERY accurate after some practice (within 0.0001", yep, one TEN-THOUSANDTH of an inch) It's also a 'shedload' cheaper than the AMMCO's I have plus cheaper for consumables (and is more tolerant of mis-use / accidents) The 3 leg 'glaze busters' / brake hone's are worthless as a precision hone although work OK for intended purposeThe best way to hone by hand is with a low speed drill, preferably one you can use at around100~ 150 rpm while learning (most rigid hones have max rpm around 400~450 up to 4" bore) Slower is MUCH easier to control as you have to get the stroke (in / out of cylinder) synchronised to the rpm to get a 45 degree cross hatch. Because I'm always broke, I got a Harbor Freight lo…

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    The Lisle hone is almost exactly the same as Sunne which works well easy to use and VERY accurate after some practice (within 0.0001", yep, one TEN-THOUSANDTH of an inch) It's also a 'shedload' cheaper than the AMMCO's I have plus cheaper for consumables (and is more tolerant of mis-use / accidents) The 3 leg 'glaze busters' / brake hone's are worthless as a precision hone although work OK for intended purposeThe best way to hone by hand is with a low speed drill, preferably one you can use at around100~ 150 rpm while learning (most rigid hones have max rpm around 400~450 up to 4" bore) Slower is MUCH easier to control as you have to get the stroke (in / out of cylinder) synchronised to the rpm to get a 45 degree cross hatch. Because I'm always broke, I got a Harbor Freight low speed high torque drill (plus coupons when it was on offer.) It maxes out around 450 rpm but I've never used it 'flat out'. I started an Instructable on 'How to Hone motorcycle cylinders' but got caught up with other stuff so never got any further

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  • Sometimes it's way easier to get hold of plumbing fittings to convert into sheet than to get actual sheet plus price difference can be minimal (although extra work involved. Several years ago I needed a solid copper ead gasket for single cylinder motorcycle. Used a 4-1/2" coupler split and flattened. as it was cheaper than buying 0.050" thick piece of sheet at the time. Used exact same method to anneal though

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  • crazypj commented on ShakeTheFuture's instructable Tin Can Hole Saw

    'ordinary' can is thin and soft enough to cut with kitchen scissors. I like the idea of case hardening using graphite powder and transformers though, I've only ever used flame or furnace with 'Casenite' case hardening compound. For a one time use cutter for softer material it could be an interesting experiment

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  • Not really, Instructables isn't public/ tax money funded but relies on subscribers. With a subscription you can download 'anything' for free. I've never yet been in a position to become a paying subscriber but have had full subscription status due to my Instructables being featured. (Pretty sure I don't have 'pro' status at present, but I haven't tried downloading anything) You can bookmark link and re-read it as much as you want for free though. If you checked my profile, I was an instructor at a motorcycle school. I had many experienced but untrained colleagues, some real good who cared and others OCD about management policy. I did this as there are way too many 'technicians' who don't ave a clue how to actually measure. I took a great degree of pride in making sure 'my' classes could a…

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    Not really, Instructables isn't public/ tax money funded but relies on subscribers. With a subscription you can download 'anything' for free. I've never yet been in a position to become a paying subscriber but have had full subscription status due to my Instructables being featured. (Pretty sure I don't have 'pro' status at present, but I haven't tried downloading anything) You can bookmark link and re-read it as much as you want for free though. If you checked my profile, I was an instructor at a motorcycle school. I had many experienced but untrained colleagues, some real good who cared and others OCD about management policy. I did this as there are way too many 'technicians' who don't ave a clue how to actually measure. I took a great degree of pride in making sure 'my' classes could actually instruct instructors who were doing things wrong It's part of the reason I was laid off when people who 'don't rock the boat' are still there even though they are totally inept in my opinion (and manufactures seem to agree, 'servicing' is now often restricted to oil and filter changes plus put some air in the tyres) less than 5% of students actually stay in the industry(2011 figures) plus, in my opinion, probably less than 1% will actually be 'good' at what they do (sadly, less than 10% of the 1% will actually make a good to decent living, no matter how good they are)

    Oh, and although this is under creative common licence, it's for 'home use' not commercial use

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  • Thanks. Cantilevered desk is a nice touch.The desk I designed and 'built' isn't a 'square box' but designed to fit into a corner with a curved front for easy access to all the peripherals plus various shelves built in for storage, printers, extra monitors, etc

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  • I was taught in mid 70's to use drill flute to get 'correct' rotation. Seen way too many 'sharp' drills done with 'your' method that have rear edge higher than 'cutting' edge. If it works for you, great but there are multiple methods for getting good cutting edge. If you have two equal spirals coming off work, you know it's (probably?) right

    The main reason not to wear gloves while sharprning 'anything' is to be able to feel temperature. If it's getting hot, it's too hot

    If bit changes colour you got it way too hot. The sparks will be red hot but I've only ever seen small (1/8"~3mm) get red at tip when re-shaping broken bits. Getting a 1/2" to 1-1/2" drill cutting edge red takes more power than average bench grinder can supply

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  • Nope, you going to supply links?

    LOL, yep, I 'designed' mine around 1999 and built most of it in 2001. Unfortunately, I built it in the room I was going to use it in and it got put into service before being finished as I was working 12+hr shifts for over 3 yrs. So far, 16 yrs later, it still isn't finished but has been 'upgraded' over the years. It's one good thing about having a LOT of space for components

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  • Very good 'ible', don't remember last time (if ever?) I ever made so many comments to replies. For anyone 'complaining' about 60 degree angle, use a pair of hex nuts with flats together to get a 120 degree 'gauge'. I was taught that 'trick around 1974. Instructor told us, a sharp 120 is way better than a blunt 'correct angle'

    I have to agree with this, I used to be a precision machinist but now spend way too long 'offhand grinding' drill bits because I'm so out of practice. Of course, over 1/4" is much easier to sharpen as you can see what your doing much better, I gave up sharpening anything under 3/16" more than 40 yrs ago (except in dire emergency and if I had a magnifier to check afterwards)

    Just re-read ArthurS22 post again. I might work a bit as reversing drill motor rotation will cause a 'bounce' with cutting edge getting less of a grind?

    I've seen people try that (and other drill 'tricks') never seen drill bit actually work on anything other than softwoods afterwards though

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  • crazypj commented on mscharch's instructable Laminated 2X4 Work Tables

    That's a really good looking piece of furniture. I don't have a planer of joiner though (or anywhere to put them if I could afford them) I guess 'garage quality' workbenches would be a good practice for anyone wanting to try this without 'equipment'?

    I would think the 'weakest' point would be the rear upright as it's being 'bent' in the middle from the braces? Even so, pretty sure it would take 1/2 ton or more on the front edge to actually damage things? (I'm not an engineer but I have worked on 'stuff' for 48+ yrs)

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  • I think a couple of people missed the point. As far as I can tell the main expense was the black paint? Everything else recycled so I guess main reason for Instructable is to show what can be done without spending ton of cash? You also get some practical stuff out of it. From experience I can tell you, using a 'step drill' (the 'Christmas tree' shaped cutters) makes drilling very thin material much easier than a regular drill and for aluminium cans, the cheapest one you can get hold of will work fine.

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  • This is a pretty educational Instructable.I've had the PA20 style since around 1980 and IWISS style for several years and done literally thousands of crimps on 1/4"~6.3mm spade terminals using 14 ~18 gauge wire without a problem, the IWISS style being slightly quicker to use. Because I'd had pretty good results I got the smaller IWISS style. I found the same as you, the dies seem to be the wrong size and impossible to get a good crimp.I'll try adjusting them as I kinda like the way they work, holding terminals better with the locking ratchet compared to PA20 style

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      • Candy Cane Stirrers
      • Easy Microwave Caramels
      • 3D Printed Creeper Christmas Tree
  • The 'improvements' you came up with make this even better

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