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  • Built in Wall Hexagon Shelves

    AMAZING. I'd like to see closeups of the complicated joint. I would have used the all-wood way shown in This Old House.. https://www.thisoldhouse.com/how-to/how-to-make-wood-hexagons-house-ones-jenn-largesse?utm_source=bm23&utm_medium=email&utm_term=How+to+Make+Wood+Hexagons+with+House+One%E2%80%99s+Jenn+Largesse&utm_content=Step+Inside+the+Westerly+Project!&utm_campaign=012720+Step+Inside+the+Westerly+Project&_bta_tid=395384179321392158388152215975717942475570048622979911099379711998653553346021892498278012351139329892because I could not have done what you did with steel strut.

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  • The Impossible Bookshelf

    Great project.. I would not drive a screw in so close to the edge as I see here. Likely to split the wood open. If you think you must have a screw close to the edge, pre-drill it.

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  • Dust Free Sanding Using a Storage Container

    At 5:56 I think, we see the flange almost yank out from the silicone holding it to the plastic tub. Thought the hose clamp would hold something more substantial to keep flange in place! And, we don't make our own plywood! We actually buy it the thickness we want! Still, you've got a very effective dust collector there. Maybe there could be a (wooden?) support structure inside the plastic bin so heavy projects could safely rest on it.

    Real fast, in factories. I love the thin plywood to ship with record albums and photos.

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  • Wheelchair Accessible Planter

    Looks good. I appreciate how a wheelchair user has room to get in there from the sides. Why did you build to 6 feet, why not 8? Why are they so deep? Have to fill all that depth with dirt. Only building problem was, screwing into end grain - considered a weak joint. If you could screw planks into an upright 2x4, that would be much longer lasting.

    When you nail or screw into end grain, this is not going to be nearly as strong as fastening into cross grain. People not familiar with carpentry just don't know these things. But now you do. Styro is smart. If you designed them, nice miters, but I would have not had such slope, such depth.

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  • How to Apply Wipe-On Varnish

    I was taught to use a tack rag (sticky cloth) to get every bit of dust. And not to do finishes where I'm making more dust! Interesting looking project.

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  • To get white concrete, use WHITE Portland, white sand, and white marble chips.

    Efflorescence is different, it takes years. White crystalline stuff weeps out of the concrete. Correct about 28 days: that's when they test for strength.

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  • I think 30 days of weather is considered enough cure to not have alkalinity issues.

    Based on the finished concrete surfaces you show, and your words about mixing water, I must say you're working rather dry. That's fine if you want the holey texture, but normal usage is to add enough water to get a soupy mix like chili, pourable but not runny. I have cast into glass globes and my concrete comes out really shiny! That won't last outdoors, but it's remarkable. Also, dunking a hardened casting still in its mold into water for a week is overkill. Water only enters via the exposed surface. And very little is needed if you mixed it as I suggest. Much more important for strength is sloshing and bouncing the mold, when half-full and then 3/4 full and all the way, if possible. See www.archicast.com for serious fun with concrete. Shown are our really big spheres guarding the FedEx…

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    Based on the finished concrete surfaces you show, and your words about mixing water, I must say you're working rather dry. That's fine if you want the holey texture, but normal usage is to add enough water to get a soupy mix like chili, pourable but not runny. I have cast into glass globes and my concrete comes out really shiny! That won't last outdoors, but it's remarkable. Also, dunking a hardened casting still in its mold into water for a week is overkill. Water only enters via the exposed surface. And very little is needed if you mixed it as I suggest. Much more important for strength is sloshing and bouncing the mold, when half-full and then 3/4 full and all the way, if possible. See www.archicast.com for serious fun with concrete. Shown are our really big spheres guarding the FedEx Forum Plaza in Memphis.

    Just how long do you believe concrete is 'hot'?

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  • I know it doesn't harden unevenly, capillary action /osmosis distributes the water. Cement powder is hydrophilic. I know we use it reliably building wheelchair ramps etc. It may have small air pockets, but they don't hurt anything. Go dig out some old fenceposts.

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  • No, I don't see it.. Big balloons? People tried weather balloons. Pressure of air is nothing like the weight of concrete. A lot of thought has gone into sandboxes, big strong crates of sand, and you hang a shaped scraper from a pendulum and scrape out the sand to leave a hemisphere void of damp sand. In theory you could do it with sand-mix. This could be the koi pond or it could contain a weather balloon which you fill to cast a hemisphere.

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  • Not sure you talked about the direction of the diagonal member but it must run from the lower hinge area up toward the upper outer corner. It is transferring the weight down to the lower hinge.

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  • Do you marinate both sides of the bird or just the skin side as shown?

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  • Form oil may be brown and smelly but I never see or smell it on the finished casting. In professional use, molds are built of Medium Density Overlay, plywood with kraft paper permanently glued to one or both sides. Form oil dampens that paper and stays there.. maybe the 'oil and water never mix' truth.

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  • Maple is generally not used for outdoor purposes. It just doesn't last. Hope you varnished the pee out of it.I soak rusty things in vinegar, wirebrush, wash, and hit them with rust neutralizer before new paint.

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  • Glass and granite? Piece of cake. Now glue a polyethylene bag to a silicone rubber ball.

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  • danzo321 commented on JettaKnight's instructable Cast Concrete Bench

    A concrete bench really needs to sit on a foundation, not bare dirt. Not going to get into it too deep, but digging good sized holes and filling with pebbles or even concrete are the approved things you should do.

    No, I don't but let me know after 4 straight days of rain.

    You talk about whacking the mold so much, I disagree with the method. If you lift and drop the mold, you really free that air. On jobsites you'll see guys use a regular shovel to lever-up the mold and then let it drop - just a couple of inches, one side at a time, is fine. Whacking is hazardous to your mold sides!

    Cinder blocks are very brittle compared with cast concrete. Consider pouring them solid with sack concrete.

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  • Water dissipation: what is this about?

    1. Form oil! Buy a gallon from a concrete yard.2. Core molds (removable centers) might be pink or blue styrofoam, tapered to release easily.

    You did all this, and never learned about form oil?

    Any oil is better than no oil! Did you use his stuff?

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  • Not a thing wrong with the casting technique but I'm wondering about the botany. Some plants should not have 'wet feet' which you will have from water always coming in from below.

    After a couple of months out in the weather, the concrete won't be 'hot' any more.

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  • Didn't you use any form oil? All that vibrating no doubt gave you good strength, but bubbles are bad.. I'd slosh the mold around when just half, then 3/4, filled.

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  • The correct oil for concrete casting is called Form Oil, and it's close to diesel fuel, so use that next time. Because the 2 gal bucket has those strength ribs around the top, I would go find something else, like a wastebasket, and we use sand and maybe steel to weight it down. Quikcrete should take overnight to harden, in the summer, so you did something wrong. I would use a piece of sheet metal as a chute to slide wet mix in. Pretty good surface anyway!

    You know about oil and water? The form oil never shows up on the concrete surface. Maybe it evaporates too. If you were going to make bucket casts a lot, you'd have an air hose nozzle in the bottom and hook up an air hose to pop the casting. Or at least a hole you could block with clay or something, to break the vacuum.We should also talk about superplasticizer but I don't know if hobbyists can get it in small quantities.

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  • I store old magazines in big ziplocs and then in a corrugated box.

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  • Standard good Memphis practice. I like the way your spice mix looks like gold to start. Wood smoke matters the most at the first couple of hours. I never saw the charcoal snake but I like it. Don't be thinking that snake will last 12 hours!

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  • Go to a restaurant supply store. They have a huge range of plastic and stainless bowls. If you get a 22" and an 18", between them you'll make a very nice concrete bowl for fire or birdbath or sink.

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  • Please talk about boring the dowel holes a little.

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  • And it strikes me that any but the lightest clamping will bend the 90º to 93, 95, 97º.. Keep a good square on the angle and give it a try. You might also create a double hooked piece that prevents spreading. Could also place the rt-angle assembly facedown on a piece of plywood with wood strips hard against both sides so it can't spread.

    In regular woodworking, you secure the diagonal piece with glue plus 18 ga nailgun. If you clamp a diagonal into a 90º, you have to be spreading the angle. The angle blocks are great but not in this construction.

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  • Have you experimented by pouring your oil liquid into a baggie, and seeing how that behaves in a vat of your other fluid?

    Seems like mineral oil is utterly colorless [water-white] and not cloudy. Tried it?

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  • Cool but I also like starting a fire with a gum wrapper. Do you know that one?

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  • "tounge and goove" should read 'Tongue and groove' and is now commonly called center-matched lumber.

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  • danzo321 commented on danzo321's instructable Make a giant statue

    There's a multi-location company, Drew Foam, that sells plastic foam. Most of their sales are 2' x 4' foam sheets used for insulation and packing. They have the big hotwire cutters to make many large foam parts as well.

    It's ordinary styrofoam. I might have said I used a Sur-form tool on it after the saws, and then we sanded it. Thanks.

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  • danzo321 commented on danzo321's instructable Make a giant statue

    I believe I covered that, no?

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  • Whew! I hate to say it but this technique, while valid, uses about 5 times the silicone necessary and many extra steps. You insist on UltraCal which is hard to find and is far harder/stronger than needed. Its only benefit is, absolutely zero expansion, making it necessary for precision foundry work. Go with any casting plaster, you won't see a difference.Knocked out by your plasticene sculptures of wee gears but they seem too delicate to work with as shown here.

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  • Don't know where you might be but you only get 120V out of an American outlet. Who led you to believe otherwise?

    You;re right! It is a bit confusing. The voltages expressed are just approximate. The most common pairs are 110/220 and 120/240.Due to line drops, the actual voltage into your home will vary with the distance from the transformer on the pole. It may be several volts above 120 if close, and as low as 107 if some distance away.Just to cross your eyes further, the actual standard is supposed to be 117/234 VAC. L

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  • What is simulated cedar? The best outdoor woods are teak, cedar, cypress, redwood.. Worst might be maple.

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  • Making the gate frame, you're screwing into end grain. This is okay for positioning lumber but never count on such a joint. If you put a block of 2x4 inside each corner, and screw into that from both directions, your joints will be far stronger.

    Can't argue with your results but you can see it would be faster to put up your fenceboards, then snap a line and cut them all at once - if you're good with a circular saw. Some want a nice curve on the top line of the gate so you'd use a saber saw.

    Tell us about your decision to rout the latch into the wood. Never seen that before.

    Not to get all know-it-all but I'm telling ALL newbies and a few experienced people, don't design anything with joints where you screw or worse, nail into endgrain. Can also use the galv steel joint reinforcers.

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  • Is this a sort-of kinky thing now? Does it narrow your waist or is it around your ribcage? Dyeing leather.. is this something that sweat can dissolve?

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  • If you have a regular-sized hole you are better off gluing a peg (dowel) in it than fooling with putty.

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  • Aahhh, did this in Jr high.. we're all in the Indian Ocean

    Aahhh, did this in Jr high.. we're all in the Indian Ocean

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  • <Besides the wood is cheaper, > Cheaper? than what? Untreated?

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  • You did a fine job if that's the look you want. I'd want them less pillow-y. Most older homeowners know too well that bags of concrete mix eventually become rocks, but the familiar pillow shape.. You can take a mineral hammer to them and get a craggy rock look. And if I were a burglar, I'd look under every too-perfect rock for the key!

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