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  • Building and Improving the Harbor Freight 6x8 Greenhouse

    I'm not absolutely certain of this but if I'm viewing your photo correctly I think the design of the door and door frame has been changed since I built mine 7 years ago. Maybe someone who has built a more recent version of the greenhouse can chime in. I don't, however, recall needing to saw off any part of the door frame and I'm pretty certain if I did modify it I would have included a photo and description of what folks needed to do. Just to clarify, my door frame is "L" shaped...the strip along each side of the door is like a piece of angle iron and wraps around the 2x4 support. That may not show up all that well in my original photos. Also, as noted in my original text, I did have to use a small spacer to mount the hinges so they are flush and the door can swing open…

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    I'm not absolutely certain of this but if I'm viewing your photo correctly I think the design of the door and door frame has been changed since I built mine 7 years ago. Maybe someone who has built a more recent version of the greenhouse can chime in. I don't, however, recall needing to saw off any part of the door frame and I'm pretty certain if I did modify it I would have included a photo and description of what folks needed to do. Just to clarify, my door frame is "L" shaped...the strip along each side of the door is like a piece of angle iron and wraps around the 2x4 support. That may not show up all that well in my original photos. Also, as noted in my original text, I did have to use a small spacer to mount the hinges so they are flush and the door can swing open without binding. Sorry I can't be of more help. Perhaps if you could post up a few more photos of the problem area I, or others, could suggest a remedy.

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  • Building and Improving the Harbor Freight 6x8 Greenhouse

    In my estimation I don't believe the UV film reduces light at all. In fact, here in the Central Valley of CA I have to keep shade screen on the southern and western sides of the greenhouse year round or any plants inside will get cooked during the heat of the day. And yes, if I built another one I would definitely use the UV film. After seven years some of the tapes that hold the film in place began to deteriorate this year so I had to temporarily remove some of the UV film to redo the tape. The Harbor Freight panels looked like the day they came out of the box. No deterioration of discoloring at all. Well worth the extra $50 I spent on the film.

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  • Tee Slot Drill Press Clamps, Easy and Quick

    Great idea.and well executed. I'm stealing this one for sure.

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  • Make Sliding Barn Doors Using Skateboard Wheels

    I'm thinking it could work with a 2x4 as you suggest but a couple thoughts. First, you will probably need to install spacers (simple washers will do) to insure the hanger straddles the 2x4 and does not squeeze the board when you tighten the wheels in place. Second, I'm not sure what the results might be due to warping of the 2x4 over time. My shed sits in the hot central valley sun of CA and the door really takes a beating in terms of warping. I could envision the door becoming difficult to open if it warped enough. But it may be worth a shot to use the less expensive 2x4 rather than Superstrut. Post your results if you go with the 2x4 idea.

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  • $25 Vibrating Garden Sifter

    A 3/8" bolt goes in the hole and is welded in place. The threaded portion of the bolt slips into the drill chuck. The purpose of the elliptical wheel is the throw the drill out of balance when it runs...which causes the drill to vibrate. The drill is strapped to the side of the shaker box. When the drill vibrates the shaker box vibrates. Hope that explanation helps.

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  • dewey302's instructable $25 Vibrating Garden Sifter 's weekly stats:
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  • EBike Conversion - Coffee Hauler

    Nice work. For those wanting the nice look of aluminum side panels like yours without the high cost, there is a "poor man's" alternative which I have used in the past. Basically it is just wrapping and gluing aluminum roof flashing over a 1/8" plywood core. I haven't done an Instructable of the technique but I do have a "how-to" on my website, https://hotrodjalopy.com/2018/05/08/plywood-core-body-panels/ Here are a few photos of the core panels I used on my electric three wheeler.

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  • Custom Electric Trike - It's for the Dogs.

    Thanks for letting me know the Kings motors link/kit is no longer available. You should be able to find similar kits on ebay, amazon or elsewhere. Use search term like "MY1016 500 watt motor" or "razor motor replacement". There are lots of different "kits" with different items included so search around for what fits your needs. My controller is 500 W but a 350 watt controller would probably do the trick for you. Try this link to get you started https://www.amazon.com/WPHMOTO-Controller-Throttle-Accelerator-Electric/dp/B07CS514JL/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=my1016+500+watt+motor+kit&qid=1582063670&sr=8-4

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  • dewey302 commented on dewey302's instructable Adaptive Tadpole Trike
    Adaptive Tadpole Trike

    Looking forward to seeing your version when it is done. I do have one suggestion/change based on our experience with this design and that is to try to gear it to about 1:1 rather than using the stock sprocket ratio. It makes it much easier for kids to pedal. We currently build all of our adaptive trikes with about a 1:1 ratio...but this was one of our earlier builds when we hadn't learned yet that we should do that. Good luck with the build.

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  • The Impossible Bookshelf

    Clever idea. Might even be worth a "sacrificial" book at each end-stop which is permanently secured to the base shelving. I can see all sorts of options and tweaks using this basic concept. Well done.

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  • Build a 7 Foot Nutcracker From Flower Pots

    Nice job. The paint vs. fabric turned out very well and probably saves a good deal of time. Really like the "Orb" he's holding. Nice touches all around. And you have good taste in wall hangings (behind and to the left of the Nutcracker). We have one almost identical.

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  • Building a Soil Sifter / Rotary Trommel

    Great Instructable and your photos are very complete and nicely done. Could you provide a bit more detail on the wire mesh you used? If I'm seeing the photos correctly you used just one piece of mesh, not two pieces connected at the center rim, correct? This would mean your roll of mesh had to be about 5 feet wide (my rough guess looking at the pictures). Where did you find 5 mm mesh that wide? And do you recall what gauge it was? Thanks for posting this...I need to build one to sift small stones.

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  • Build a 7 Foot Nutcracker From Flower Pots

    Absolutely terrific. I'll bet kids (and adults) get a huge kick out of what your come up with. Very impressive. Kudos for going off script and giving these creations a whole new twist.

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  • Angle Grinder Tube / Pipe Sander Polishing Attachment Tool

    Excellent idea and well put together. I'll be stealing much of your design but making an adapter to mount it solid to my workbench. In some cases I'd rather bring the work piece to the the sander than visa versa. Thanks for sharing your ingenuity.

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    • Steering Assisted Adaptive Trike
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  • dewey302 commented on dewey302's instructable Hub Motor Delta Trike
    Hub Motor Delta Trike

    As you can tell from the Instructable, most of the parts and pieces for this trike were salvaged and re-purposed from old and discarded used bikes. What I couldn't gather from old bikes (such as the trike frame) I fabricated myself from raw materials. For the most part, wherever I bought new (like the hub motor, controller, throttle etc) I indicated where the items can be purchased. This Instrtuctable is a few years old now so best prices and sources for these parts have changed. But searching Ebay, Amazon and Alibaba should find you everything you need. If you are having trouble locating a particular part, let me know and I'll try to offer some suggestions.As a side note, this trike was built in 2015 and this Instructable posted in early 2016. The trike is still going strong an…

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    As you can tell from the Instructable, most of the parts and pieces for this trike were salvaged and re-purposed from old and discarded used bikes. What I couldn't gather from old bikes (such as the trike frame) I fabricated myself from raw materials. For the most part, wherever I bought new (like the hub motor, controller, throttle etc) I indicated where the items can be purchased. This Instrtuctable is a few years old now so best prices and sources for these parts have changed. But searching Ebay, Amazon and Alibaba should find you everything you need. If you are having trouble locating a particular part, let me know and I'll try to offer some suggestions.As a side note, this trike was built in 2015 and this Instructable posted in early 2016. The trike is still going strong and is ridden 6 days a week and a little over 1,500 miles a year. Since these photos were taken I've added lights and turnsignals but little else has changed...in fact much of the trike still remains unpainted. I have to replace the SLA battery pack about every 9 months. I refurbish the old batteries (basically just topping up the water levels) and they get a second life in a variety of other projects and experiments I tinker with.

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  • Glad to hear you are already tinkering with improvements and upgrades for your skimmer. The solar collector idea is great...might be able to then reduce your battery size/weight as well. One thing the Solar Breeze does well is their battery and electronics...which in my experience have far outlived the mechanical elements of the machine. I look forward to seeing what you come up with for Ver 1.2 of Skara.

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  • First off, massive kudos for tackling this Instructable. While there may not be large numbers of readers here who have pools, for those of us that do, the need for a reliable and efficient pool skimmer can be paramount. I believe that Instructables, including those I have authored myself, are always meant as a starting point, someone willing to experiment with a new approach in the hopes that others can use those early testing grounds to build an ever better and ever more useful solution. It is in that vein that I offer up the following observations. I have a relatively long history using one of the most highly touted pool skimmers on the market, the Solar Breeze. In the past 6 years I have owned three of these units. While they work well when they are working, not one of them has …

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    First off, massive kudos for tackling this Instructable. While there may not be large numbers of readers here who have pools, for those of us that do, the need for a reliable and efficient pool skimmer can be paramount. I believe that Instructables, including those I have authored myself, are always meant as a starting point, someone willing to experiment with a new approach in the hopes that others can use those early testing grounds to build an ever better and ever more useful solution. It is in that vein that I offer up the following observations. I have a relatively long history using one of the most highly touted pool skimmers on the market, the Solar Breeze. In the past 6 years I have owned three of these units. While they work well when they are working, not one of them has lasted beyond ten months without needing major and or minor repairs. And these units retail between $500 and $600. So building a really good and long lasting pool skimmer in no easy task. Even for those that are in the business. And nearly all of my observations below come with some really frustrating experiences with the Solar Breeze.The major enemies to any pool skimmer are sunlight, pool chemicals, tiny debris and friction.With those four culprits in minds I would raise the following questions and/or suggestions for possibly improving on the design in this Instructable.1) The video shows the skimmer collecting very large leaves. With the exception of a couple weeks out of the year our pool is plagued not with large leaves or large debris, but rather very small debris, seeds, pollen, dust, fluff, dead insects, fine leaves and grass clippings. The two issues I see in the above design are that these very small particles will cling to the cloth “conveyor belt” as it goes over the top roller and simply be redeposited in the pool when the belt goes back under water. It would also appear from the video and still photos (although this could be wrong due to the angle of the shots) that there is a gap between the top of the conveyor and the front panel of the collection bin. Any small item, like seeds and insects that don’t stick to the cloth belt would simply drop into that gap and be deposited back in the pool.2) It would appear that the large debris collected by the conveyor will bunch up at the top of the inclined front panel of the collection bin. I could imagine on a windy day, with lots of leaves, that they could start packing up on that inclined panel and eventually simply overflow the sides and back into the water if the unit is left to run unattended. 3) The descriptions given with the Instructable do not identify many of the specific materials used so product quality can not be determined. But EVERYTHING on a pool skimmer must be resistant to the highly destruction UV rays of the sun and to the corrosive nature of the acid and chlorine that are used daily for pool maintenance. The first generation of $500 Solar Breeze skimmers made this mistake. The entire body panel for the skimmer simply fell apart because the fiberglass material was not adequately UV resistant. The shells for these units simply disintegrated. I have no idea of the composition of the plastics used for 3D printing, but I doubt it has any UV resistance and that within a few weeks or months of usage, the paddle wheels and other printed component may begin the deteriorate. I would hope this is not the case, but it is something to keep a close eye on. The same goes for the cloth material used for the conveyor belt. UV rays combined with pool chemicals will destroy most fabrics in rather short order unless they are specially protected from such hazzards.4) Another one of the Solar Breeze’s major weaknesses is the axle supports and axle bearings. And I would think the same will be true of the above design. In early models of the Solar Breeze they simply had plastic axles rotating in plastic sleeves. These began to wear out and go out of line within a few months of use. This put additional pressure on the motors and gears and eventually the units would begin making loud grinding noises before stopping altogether, requiring total replacement. In the second generation the company upgraded to stainless steel axles but they still rotated in plastic sleeves. These units lasted a few months longer but still needed replaced on a constant basis. Perhaps the above design will not encounter this issue. Only a year or so of everyday use will tell the story.5) Another potential problem is the area where the motor’s axle leaves the body of the motor. From what I could glean from the photos it appears water and pool chemicals could come in contact with that area and eventually get inside the motor itself. This could create corrosion and interference with the electronics. Again, time will tell on that one.6) From what is shown in the photos and the description, the motors are “sealed” with a heavy coat of synthetic paint. Unfortunately, most paints (enamel, urethanes, acrylics, epoxies etc) are typically NOT UV resistant and they will begin to flake, peel and/or “dust” under heavy sunlight encountered in any pool. Add pool chemicals into the mix and most paints will struggle to maintain that protective “seal” around the electrical components. Again, let me express my admiration for the work done in designing and building this skimmer. I would put it in the noteworthy category of “proof of concept”. It appears to be mechanically sound and a terrific base upon which others can hopefully tinker their way to a machine that will not only collect all sizes of pool debris but do it over the long haul, while not breaking down due to the destructive nature of UV rays and pool chemicals.

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  • There are no signs of any chemical reaction or corrosion of the aluminum frame after 6 plus years of use. As I recall, the instructions call for setting the frame on treated lumber or solid concrete and I am not aware of other builders having a corrosion problem due to treated lumber. One other possibility (if others have encountered this problem) might be that here in CA treated lumber does not use arsenate or any derivatives (note the treated timbers are brown rather than the more typical green seen in pressure treated wood) and thus any potential corrosion is avoided. If builders are concerned about potential corrosion I suspect a thin plastic or foam barrier between the two materials would be effective.

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    • Steady Hand: Mouse Control for Folks With Parkinson's
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  • Kudos on the project and your decision to show it warts and all. We all learn much more by seeing the problems that crop up (and how to work around them) than by Instructables that gloss over those issues and make everything sound super easy (it almost never is). I've never worked with Australian Red Cedar but I'm surprised that any well cured wood would still have that much movement left in it. I'm guessing the issue had little or nothing to do with your approach or your tools. Oh, and nice looking "mini-table".

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  • Great tip and relatively easy sink remedy. Thanks for posting

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  • dewey302 commented on Marc Gyver's instructable Electric Car

    Fun project, and some nice innovation on things like the seat construction/upholstery, lights etc. One cautionary note, in some states and countires this design would not be legal to drive on public streets and roads. In most of the U.S., for example, bicycles must have three wheels or less and they must retain their pedals and chains etc. so they can be propelled without the electric motor. This particular vehicle (with four wheels and no pedals) would be an "automobile" and would have to meet the same legal and safety requirements as a car (air bags etc.)

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  • The hanger keeps the wheel centered on the rail. Note the way the hanger is made in step 3 and how it is mounted in step 5. The hanger curves over the top of the wheel and over the rail on both front and back sides and is then bolted to the door which hangs below the rail.

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  • dewey302 commented on JasonF205's instructable Faux Brick Walls

    Good point on liquid paint making the compound too runny. But the dry pigment ideal might work. I've used it in concrete and it works pretty well. Would require experimentation to get the right hues and colors. May turn out to be easiest and fastest just to do it the way you did originally.

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  • dewey302 commented on JasonF205's instructable Faux Brick Walls

    Very cool. And I liked Pumuggel's comment above regarding mixing color into the joint compound right from the beginning. You could make up small batches of compound each with slightly different color mix and then apply to alternating "bricks" as you go to create a natural variety of coloring. Great Instructable.

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  • Thanks for letting me know. I hope the Instructable is helpful.

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  • dewey302 commented on dewey302's instructable Adaptive Tadpole Trike

    The photos here in the Instructable are the closest thing to "prints" that we have. The drawing shown in Step 2 will give you a fairly good idea of the front end and steering design and it is to scale so you may be able to use the proportions. Most of the measurements and cutting angles for the various parts and pieces are outlined in the text. Unfortunately, a lot of what we build is done using the "seat-of-the-pants" method along with sketches on a napkin. So we don't draw up elaborate blueprints. One of these days I suppose we'll have to get a little more professional. But as long as you apply the Ackerman Principals shown in step 10, your front steering should work properly no matter what exact measurements and proportions you use in the rest of the design.…

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    The photos here in the Instructable are the closest thing to "prints" that we have. The drawing shown in Step 2 will give you a fairly good idea of the front end and steering design and it is to scale so you may be able to use the proportions. Most of the measurements and cutting angles for the various parts and pieces are outlined in the text. Unfortunately, a lot of what we build is done using the "seat-of-the-pants" method along with sketches on a napkin. So we don't draw up elaborate blueprints. One of these days I suppose we'll have to get a little more professional. But as long as you apply the Ackerman Principals shown in step 10, your front steering should work properly no matter what exact measurements and proportions you use in the rest of the design. Sorry I couldn't be of more help on your request.

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  • I use cheapo hair extensions and wigs from The Dollar Store. I just lay them over the head (the top planter pot) and then put the hat on to hold the hair in place. You can sort of adjust the hair length by how much you tuck up under the hat.

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  • Don't know...I guess it depends on how long "eventually" is. I've been burning wood in mine for nearly 5 years. Even if it burned through next week (which it shows no sign of) these little grills only cost about $35 (the original cost $30). So no an outlandish investment. I'm guess rust will be the culprit before heat.

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  • Very nice looking. Now you just have to put up with the long wait until Christmas season.

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  • I'm not totally certain I understand your question. Are you intending to build an inner circle of tree rings inside your existing 36" fire pit ring? If so, you would need 6 sections of the 24" I.D. ring sections...that's assuming you are going two high.

    I don't think that will work using the tree rings pictured in the Instructable. These rings have a fixed radius and thus can only make a circle of one size. The smaller rings make a circle with a 14" diameter and the larger rings make a circle with a 24" diameter. If you try to put them around a 36" circle (or larger) they will not create a nice circle. Rather it will be a ring with a very wavy circumference. I suppose they could be set up that way but I would question the stability of that sort of ring.

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  • dewey302's instructable Rear Steered Adaptive Trike's weekly stats:
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  • dewey302 commented on tomatoskins's instructable Hot Pipe Wood Bending

    Very clever. And well explained.

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  • I salute your terrific use of old, rusty and forgotten materials. Looks like a fun ride.

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  • No I haven't. But I'll make a couple observations. I believe these "kits" change from time to time with somewhat different materials and components. Harbor Freight may even get them from different suppliers, and sometimes the parts and pieces my be of a different quality. Regarding your specific problem, can you see any actual evidence of rust or oxidation (may be a white or greenish powdery substance)? Also, where do you live? My thinking is that aluminum (the struts) and steel (possibly the bolts) at reacting to each other and eating away at the bolts. If you live in a salty air or high humidity area, this might hurry that process along. This is pure conjecture at this point but worth exploring. Might test a remedy by insuring the bolts are aluminum (they will…

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    No I haven't. But I'll make a couple observations. I believe these "kits" change from time to time with somewhat different materials and components. Harbor Freight may even get them from different suppliers, and sometimes the parts and pieces my be of a different quality. Regarding your specific problem, can you see any actual evidence of rust or oxidation (may be a white or greenish powdery substance)? Also, where do you live? My thinking is that aluminum (the struts) and steel (possibly the bolts) at reacting to each other and eating away at the bolts. If you live in a salty air or high humidity area, this might hurry that process along. This is pure conjecture at this point but worth exploring. Might test a remedy by insuring the bolts are aluminum (they will not be attracted to a magnet if the aluminum). Also would be good to know if others have experience anything similar.

    Here's a current shot of the shade material. As you can see, not hugely attractive but it serves the purpose. Material is held on with common plastic clamps (I buy them by the bag from Lowes, Home Depot, Amazon etc.)

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  • dewey302 commented on RCEM's instructable Easy Ink Art for Everyone

    Clever. And very nice results. Thanks so much for posting this.

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  • Great seat project. A whole bunch of good ideas to steal. Love the mini TV tucked in the side liner.

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  • Willys36, great to see you posting your inventive creations here on Instructables and to catch up with an old Hotrodders.Com friend. Your long time dedication to the Mysterion project has really paid off. What a masterpiece. Cboy

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  • If you are referring to the door I made in the O.P., I purposely did not include any photos of its construction since I would not recommend building a door the way I did...too much warping due to moisture and sun. The rollers work great...the wooden door construction - not so great. Win some...lose some.

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  • Wow. I've been trying for years to figure out how to make smooth, permanent bends in PVC. I'll be trying this out for sure. Thanks for sharing your ingenious solution.

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  • For those concerned about the impact of UV rays on plastic you might try wrapping the tubs with weed barrier cloth (like what is used in this instructable to cover the rocks.) I've had good luck here in the Central Valley of California (read VERY intense sunlight) by shielding my plastic pots this way. It also helps prevent over heating of the root systems of the plants. Unfortunately, weed barrier is not the prettiest material and it can be a challenge fitting it around odd shaped containers...but it is functional. I've had plastic pots in the direct sun for five years or more with no obvious deterioration.

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  • dewey302's instructable Phone Belt for 84 Cents's weekly stats:
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  • Yes, we mounted the new fan horizontally in the ceiling hole we had already made. We had to do a little bit of framing and drywall work because the new fan was a slightly different shape than our old hole. BTW, the CX30BD2SP is still performing great.

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  • True, fire brick would be a better option assuming the brick is in direct contact with the flame and/or coals. Here, the fire is contained in the inner metal liner, the Weber grill. There is a generous air space between the inner circle of brick and the liner and the outer circle of brick is further insulated with a 2" layer of stone. There is also venting space between the upper and lower circles of brick so cool air is drawn in and exits at the top. I have many times tested the temperature of the inner circle of tree rings and have never had a time I could not place my hands or feet on the brick due to heat.

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  • You might be right mid-life-crisis. I looked back at my original (2012) order from New Clue and they listed the wheels as "50mm Black Skateboard Wheels and Bearings Set - item #280722030363". So that is why I referred to them as skateboard wheels. I guess the bottom line is, if you are looking for a set of wheels, include skateboard wheels in your search.

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  • dewey302 commented on Stish's instructable DIY Notebook Stand/Cooler

    Very cool Where do I download the driver?

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  • This seems to be a regional problem. HD stores carry the rings in some regions, and in others they do not. Some Home Depots will order the rings for you (you can get the sku and item numbers off the HD web site) to be delivered to that store. This can often take a long time for delivery, however, since they only send them when they are shipping other items to that particular store. Wish I had a better alternative for you.

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  • Apply the UV plastic as shown in Step 6 of the Instructable.

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  • My understanding is that the film on HF panels is only for protection against scratches and damage during shipping rather than a UV protective layer. I have also used high quality UV resistant panels for other projects. These come with a plastic film as well but it's purpose is to mark the outer (UV protected) side of the panel as well as protection during shipping. On higher quality panels, the UV protection is a part of the plastic itself, not a thin sheet over the top.

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