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Dolce is a Musician and New Media artist. She likes experimenting, taking things apart, and hopefully putting them back together again.

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  • Minty Tunes: Bluetooth Audio Player (w/ Rechargeable Battery)

    that's awesome!

    very creative use of a paperclip box! glad it worked for you, and good luck on your next iteration!

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    • Minty Tunes: Bluetooth Audio Player (w/ Rechargeable Battery)
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  • Minty Tunes: Bluetooth Audio Player (w/ Rechargeable Battery)

    Haha I must agree, mounting board can do wonders!By the way, I also added some more observations/tests regarding the behavior of Minty Tunes in the Appendix (and will continue to do so)... so thanks again for your initial comment as it gave me the motivation to expand the list in case peeps get curious!

    That's awesome - can't wait to see your project in the wooden form! I also added some more observations regarding the behavior of Minty Tunes in the Appendix (and will continue to do so).

    Hi PhantomFreak, Thanks for your feedback and although I haven't heard any humming, will keep that in mind! I have also listed some observations in the Appendix section in regards to range and other tests, if you feel like checking out.Haha, yes my iPhone doesn't have a headphone socket and I lost the adapter! The Intro explains that and other reasons for making this, plus the versatile usage (not just for headphones), but I'll admit... I mostly wanted to do this for fun! :)Something unexpected I also found through using Minty Tunes is that because I'm oftentimes pulling out my phone and putting it back, I'm always caught in a spidery tangle, or accidentally pulling the plug out with wired headphones connected to my phone... extra annoying in a crowd (like the subway, which I commute o…

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    Hi PhantomFreak, Thanks for your feedback and although I haven't heard any humming, will keep that in mind! I have also listed some observations in the Appendix section in regards to range and other tests, if you feel like checking out.Haha, yes my iPhone doesn't have a headphone socket and I lost the adapter! The Intro explains that and other reasons for making this, plus the versatile usage (not just for headphones), but I'll admit... I mostly wanted to do this for fun! :)Something unexpected I also found through using Minty Tunes is that because I'm oftentimes pulling out my phone and putting it back, I'm always caught in a spidery tangle, or accidentally pulling the plug out with wired headphones connected to my phone... extra annoying in a crowd (like the subway, which I commute on regularly)! Plus, adding the adapter gets super awkward. So plugging it into a tiny tin and leaving it in place, tangle-free, has been a surprising bonus.Cheers!

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  • Minty Tunes: Bluetooth Audio Player (w/ Rechargeable Battery)

    Cool! I did check out your page! I didn't see the audio player one though. However, I did enjoy your Rubix cube logo one! :D

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  • DIY USB Midi Controller With Arduino: a Beginner's Guide

    Hey migueloid, that's rad and very excited for you!I haven't actually tried changing the buttons to CC messages, but I'm sure it could be done. :) However, it would take quite a bit of rearranging the code though -- so firstly, just to check which version of code or micro-controller are you using? (i.e. atmega32u4 or atmega328)But before we go through all the work of recoding though, let's also confirm changing the button to CC is what you need to do to reach your goal!! CC (Change Control) - is typically mapped to Knobs/Faders because it gives you a range between 0-127.So... perhaps your goal is to jump to a specific CC number on your knob/fader? Maybe you can also describe more in-depthly what you would like to do? And which DAW / VST are you using? Feel free to attach screenshots.…

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    Hey migueloid, that's rad and very excited for you!I haven't actually tried changing the buttons to CC messages, but I'm sure it could be done. :) However, it would take quite a bit of rearranging the code though -- so firstly, just to check which version of code or micro-controller are you using? (i.e. atmega32u4 or atmega328)But before we go through all the work of recoding though, let's also confirm changing the button to CC is what you need to do to reach your goal!! CC (Change Control) - is typically mapped to Knobs/Faders because it gives you a range between 0-127.So... perhaps your goal is to jump to a specific CC number on your knob/fader? Maybe you can also describe more in-depthly what you would like to do? And which DAW / VST are you using? Feel free to attach screenshots.Pretty much all standard controllers use Midi Note On/Off for buttons (I also double checked with my Akai and APC controllers - every single button/pad is Note On/Off!) -- They still work with controlling VST plugins no problem... but specifically for toggling functions. (like, I have a Sketch Cassette VST, and I can use Note On/Off to toggle between A mode and B mode, Bypass On/Off, etc.)If the assigned MIDI Notes conflict with, say, a keyboard you are using (you are correct! C2, Ch1 is my default assigned note in the code for the first button)... you can much more easily reassign the note/channel within the sketch. I attached a screenshot of where it is in the code for both versions atmega32u4/atmega328.I have some other ideas, but first would like to hear more about the specifics of your goal before I ramble on more... haha!

    Aha -- glad to clarify that and will make things more straightfoward using my example sketches!That is a good question, and it makes sense why it would seem confusing.The good news is, I think you will be in luck!Even though the signal/button are both momentary (Note On/Off)... so when you press/hold it stays "on", then release it goes "off" (like a keyboard).... BUT most DAWs and VST developers have made their plug-ins / effects so that toggle functions like I described before (bypass, A/B mode) will already "latch" using Midi On/Off. Yay! So like... press/release the button, go to A mode.... press/release the button again, go to B mode. This also applies to just general Audio Effects that come with your DAW.I will give a caveat, that some more advanced p…

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    Aha -- glad to clarify that and will make things more straightfoward using my example sketches!That is a good question, and it makes sense why it would seem confusing.The good news is, I think you will be in luck!Even though the signal/button are both momentary (Note On/Off)... so when you press/hold it stays "on", then release it goes "off" (like a keyboard).... BUT most DAWs and VST developers have made their plug-ins / effects so that toggle functions like I described before (bypass, A/B mode) will already "latch" using Midi On/Off. Yay! So like... press/release the button, go to A mode.... press/release the button again, go to B mode. This also applies to just general Audio Effects that come with your DAW.I will give a caveat, that some more advanced plugins (like Amplitube) may require slightly more setup to map your settings properly... but there are plenty of articles... like, I just Googled, "How to map MIDI to Amplitube in Ableton" for instance, and an article popped up how to adjust my DAW's settings. Hope that helps!

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  • DIY USB Midi Controller With Arduino: a Beginner's Guide

    Aha I see, I was afraid of the taper changing -- but a semi-quick test and we all gain some valuable knowledge / experience! Thanks for sharing and looking forward to the video!

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  • DIY USB Midi Controller With Arduino: a Beginner's Guide

    Hey that is good you found that info out, and it is a clever idea!I always encourage using what you have laying around first... and while of course it's at your own risk and may not have super-smooth results, but this application is pretty low power so I'd say worth trying out!I haven't tried it myself, so after doing some quick searching... there's a lot of inconsistent information (not a surprise)... BUT, I believe you would connect your resistor between the Ground and the Voltage (the outer 2 lugs)... this would make the circuit be in Parallel, which would require a 20k resistor.*I did read one article where they put the resistor between Ground and Center lug... but I would try the outer lugs first...As for the 20K resistor value, it is because the placement would be in a Parallel circ…

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    Hey that is good you found that info out, and it is a clever idea!I always encourage using what you have laying around first... and while of course it's at your own risk and may not have super-smooth results, but this application is pretty low power so I'd say worth trying out!I haven't tried it myself, so after doing some quick searching... there's a lot of inconsistent information (not a surprise)... BUT, I believe you would connect your resistor between the Ground and the Voltage (the outer 2 lugs)... this would make the circuit be in Parallel, which would require a 20k resistor.*I did read one article where they put the resistor between Ground and Center lug... but I would try the outer lugs first...As for the 20K resistor value, it is because the placement would be in a Parallel circuit. (10k is a good initial guess though, but that would be if the circuit is in series... but that doesn't apply for a pot since you are trying to change the difference in value vs. a single value like an LED or something)For resistors in parallel, the formula is: Rsum = (R1*R2)/(R1+R2)... In your case:Rsum = combined resistance (10k)R1 = Pot resistance (20k)R2 = Resistor's... resistance (20k)Here is the formula rearranged if you don't feel like doing math. R2 = (R1*Rsum)/(R1-Rsum)If you don't have a 20k resistor, you can also theoretically link (2) 10k pots in series... again, may have weirdish results.LASTLY... the part I couldn't really find a straightforward result on is the taper. Meaning, if it still stays Linear... some people say it works and others say it doesn't.I think a quick visual test is using the Arduino IDE's Serial Plotter, which graphs out the pot as you turn it. In fact, you can just run the Example code "AnalogReadSerial" [File < Examples < 01.Basics...] so you don't have to do any coding!Curious to find out what happens! We are all learning as we go. ;)

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