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Inventing (and breaking stuff to see how it works) since before the turn of the century...

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  • ~ World's Greenest  WATER PUMP ~

    Ahh, the sticky valve issue. Keeping the valve cycling straight up and down is a key to success. if it wobbles, it can wedge into the valve seal and cause the stick. Increasing the diameter of your rod guide washers a bit or adding another set along the upper valve rod so the valve has to travel up/down more in a straight line might help. Also, a smooth seal against the hockey puck is key. When I watch your video again, am I seeing that the sink tail stock has the smooth rolled lip at the top adjuster cap? perhaps it was soldered in upside down. I put mine in from the bottom so that smooth round lip was contacting the puck not the sharp edge. That could be a big difference as the sharp edge could be causing wedging or an imperfect seal. If water is leaking around your puck seal, it will…

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    Ahh, the sticky valve issue. Keeping the valve cycling straight up and down is a key to success. if it wobbles, it can wedge into the valve seal and cause the stick. Increasing the diameter of your rod guide washers a bit or adding another set along the upper valve rod so the valve has to travel up/down more in a straight line might help. Also, a smooth seal against the hockey puck is key. When I watch your video again, am I seeing that the sink tail stock has the smooth rolled lip at the top adjuster cap? perhaps it was soldered in upside down. I put mine in from the bottom so that smooth round lip was contacting the puck not the sharp edge. That could be a big difference as the sharp edge could be causing wedging or an imperfect seal. If water is leaking around your puck seal, it will tend to hold your valve closed when it slams shut. The obvious solution seems to be to add more weight, but then the valve tends to stick open, so, first thing to try is adjusting the valve gap smaller. That will increase cycle speed and also decrease feed water flow pressure so the valve should drop open more easily once it finds the rhythm that you can hear when the pressure wave reverberates up and down the feed pipe. Second solution is to improve the valve seal so you may want to sand the puck smooth and also the metal it touches against to improve the seal. Keep at it, you will find the sweet spot soon enough.

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  • ~ World's Greenest  WATER PUMP ~

    Good Job, Sure, you can add whatever amount of weight you like to the top of the valve rod, I just had a hunk of solid metal I used on the bottom but you can load up the top as well. On my pump, adjusting the cycle rate to the faster side seemed to be the best way to fix the "stuck closed" issue. The explanation I found was that the pump cycle generates a pressure wave that echos back and forth in the feed pipe which helps to suck the valve open again on each cycle. So you have to keep adjusting the cycle rate until you find the sweet spot where the pressure wave syncs up with the valve timing and then you get best valve operation along with best output. But, no worries, as long as you are operating at a rate you like, why mess with perfection. It feels pretty good to see your …

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    Good Job, Sure, you can add whatever amount of weight you like to the top of the valve rod, I just had a hunk of solid metal I used on the bottom but you can load up the top as well. On my pump, adjusting the cycle rate to the faster side seemed to be the best way to fix the "stuck closed" issue. The explanation I found was that the pump cycle generates a pressure wave that echos back and forth in the feed pipe which helps to suck the valve open again on each cycle. So you have to keep adjusting the cycle rate until you find the sweet spot where the pressure wave syncs up with the valve timing and then you get best valve operation along with best output. But, no worries, as long as you are operating at a rate you like, why mess with perfection. It feels pretty good to see your water flowing and not spend a dime for pump fuel doesn't it???

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  • ~ World's Greenest  WATER PUMP ~

    Congratulations on getting your pump running. I hope it gives you many years of fuel free operation. One comment I have for you is that from your video clip the cycle rate seems about half as fast as I ran my pump so you may be able to make an adjustment to the top cap and close the valve gap a bit so it cycles faster. Then you will get a lot more water delivered to your pond. I'm not sure why you need the springs which will weaken over time and stop your pump, you could always add more weight to the top or bottom of the valve rod and then adjust the valve gap again to make it cycle properly. If the valve tends to slam shut and stay closed, check your pressure tank bladder and maybe increase the pressure a few pounds and remember that you will have to manually push open the valve a lot …

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    Congratulations on getting your pump running. I hope it gives you many years of fuel free operation. One comment I have for you is that from your video clip the cycle rate seems about half as fast as I ran my pump so you may be able to make an adjustment to the top cap and close the valve gap a bit so it cycles faster. Then you will get a lot more water delivered to your pond. I'm not sure why you need the springs which will weaken over time and stop your pump, you could always add more weight to the top or bottom of the valve rod and then adjust the valve gap again to make it cycle properly. If the valve tends to slam shut and stay closed, check your pressure tank bladder and maybe increase the pressure a few pounds and remember that you will have to manually push open the valve a lot of times until you get some back pressure in the tank before it will automatically cycle by itself. My pump worked best at a rate of just under 2 cycles per second. Great pictures, love the turtles!

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  • ~ World's Greenest  WATER PUMP ~

    The pressure was measured at the pump outlet with a standard water pressure guage. The guage spikes and drops on each cycle averaging about 28 psi on the reading. The pump could easily be generating spikes much higher than that.

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  • eltigre's instructable ~ Duct Tape Beer Cozy ~'s weekly stats:
    • ~ Duct Tape Beer Cozy ~
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  • slight misunderstanding. the innertube is still inside but I drilled a hole through the plastic pipe tank and installed the innertube valve stem through it so it sticks out the side of the tank and can be used to fill the tube from the outside of the tank without taking apart the tank so the pump does not have to be stopped and drained to fill up the innertube.

    I was using it at an elevation of 110' above the pump. That said, the delivery pipe was made of pvc and was over 700' long and 3/4" diameter so being non-rigid plus that long, it must have reduced my output flow considerably because the pump had 16 gallons of water in the delivery pipe resisting each cycle. The shorter the delivery pipe vertical lift the more water it will deliver. So if you have to travel water a long way, go as straight up as you can from the pump and then let gravity run the water downhill to your end delivery point. Remember the ancient Romans and their aquaducts...

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  • Hi Shawn, There are a number of ways to improve efficiency (as measured by amount of water delivered per minute)1, position gate valve downstream of pressure tank.2. adjust pump cycle rate for optimum delivery (requires timed testing on site)3. use an internal pressure bladder (bicycle tube or use bladder tank) instead of snifter valve 4. install additional pumps delivering to same delivery pipe to increase flow (avoid pumps larger than 4" or smaller than 1.5") 5. if delivery site is a long horizontal distance away from pump, set up the minimum vertical delivery point possible and use gravity to deliver water to the end use location. (like an aqueduct system) The less water your pump must push up a pipe to the end use location the more volume it will deliver. e.g. if your end us…

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    Hi Shawn, There are a number of ways to improve efficiency (as measured by amount of water delivered per minute)1, position gate valve downstream of pressure tank.2. adjust pump cycle rate for optimum delivery (requires timed testing on site)3. use an internal pressure bladder (bicycle tube or use bladder tank) instead of snifter valve 4. install additional pumps delivering to same delivery pipe to increase flow (avoid pumps larger than 4" or smaller than 1.5") 5. if delivery site is a long horizontal distance away from pump, set up the minimum vertical delivery point possible and use gravity to deliver water to the end use location. (like an aqueduct system) The less water your pump must push up a pipe to the end use location the more volume it will deliver. e.g. if your end use location is 400' away and 50' above your pump and you connect a 1" delivery pipe, the pump has to generate enough pressure to move the volume of water in the pipe ( 15085.71 cubic inches) on every cycle. But, if you can locate your delivery pipe so it is 51' vertical to your pump and 349' sloping down to your end use location, the pump must only move 1923.42 cubic inches of water on each cycle, gravity will take the water the rest of the way to your delivery point. This will cause your pump to perform less work and deliver more volume on each cycle.

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  • the instructions for building are right on the pictures themselves.

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