author2

hulkbuild

101
Inbox View Profile
12Instructables143,152Views118CommentsArkansas
I love experimenting with science and physics, especially projects that involve electromagnetism, energy conservation and audio.

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Space Challenge
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Space Challenge
Instrument Contest
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Instrument Contest
Shelving Contest 2016
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Shelving Contest 2016
  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    I'm glad to help, and I'm honored that you chose to try making a Geiger counter from my instructable. It makes all the time I put into it all the more worth it. Wow, Hinkley C looks like quite an undertaking! I hadn't heard of it. Nuclear power isn't perfect but I'm glad that we have it. I'm also glad that the power company is invested in the community. It's funny that I didn't know what you meant by "every cloud" so I googled it. I may have heard "every cloud has a silver lining" but I'm guessing it might be a particularly English idiom. Anyway, tangent aside, happy making!

    View Instructable »
  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    You're welcome! Hopefully you can get it working. Sadly no, regular diodes like the 1N4148s will not work. You will have to get zener diodes, and ones with high values so that you don't have to use a ton of them. I ended up buying a multi-pack of zeners off of eBay for this project, though you could buy a pack like this and it would give you just what you need:https://www.amazon.com/5PCS-1N5378B-DIODE-ZENER-1N5378/dp/B01680H7N8The SI 25G tube should work just fine, and from a little looking around, the working voltage range seems to be 382-398 volts and the anode resistor is 1.5M ohms. Maybe your paperwork would confirm this? No, your voltage should not drop to zero. It seems like your fly swatter is putting out some good voltage, though it seems there is a problem with the rest of your c…

    see more »

    You're welcome! Hopefully you can get it working. Sadly no, regular diodes like the 1N4148s will not work. You will have to get zener diodes, and ones with high values so that you don't have to use a ton of them. I ended up buying a multi-pack of zeners off of eBay for this project, though you could buy a pack like this and it would give you just what you need:https://www.amazon.com/5PCS-1N5378B-DIODE-ZENER-1N5378/dp/B01680H7N8The SI 25G tube should work just fine, and from a little looking around, the working voltage range seems to be 382-398 volts and the anode resistor is 1.5M ohms. Maybe your paperwork would confirm this? No, your voltage should not drop to zero. It seems like your fly swatter is putting out some good voltage, though it seems there is a problem with the rest of your circuit (probably the diodes) that is allowing the voltage to get grounded out to basically zero. Ah, so you live in England. Good luck finding a radiation source. I'm glad to help, so don't be afraid to reach out.

    View Instructable »
  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    That's a good question. I think that in most cases a resistor there would be a good precaution, and one at the base of the transistor too. The funny thing about this circuit is that despite putting out several hundred volts, the amperage is super extremely low. That means the high voltage isn't dangerous and the resistors aren't needed. The circuit works fine and possibly better without them. At least, that's my experience.

    View Instructable »
    • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts
      1,213 views
      12 favorites
      1 comments
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you so much for your kind words! I'm also pretty happy with how the model turned out. It was a lot of work but I couldn't be happier with it in my collection. Cute lamp by the way.

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you so much for saying so! I'm glad you like it. I'll certainly be posting more projects, hopefully another one as soon as next month.

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hi friend! Your work on the pattern looks very good. I hope it works well for you, and of course anyone else trying to use A3 size paper. If your home printer is an inkjet, it's possible that some of the inkjet nozzles that print red have gotten clogged. My printer was given to me and didn't print at all when I first got it, even with new ink cartridges. I had to do an extreme unclog where you use a syringe to force hot water and ammonia through the port where the ink cartridge normally goes on. Anyways, good luck building the model and don't be afraid to reach out if you have any questions or need assistance.

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Holy heck! It looks amazing! You did a fantastic job! Thank you so much for sharing, it really means a lot to see that someone actually made the model - it makes all the work I did even more worthwile.

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hey Alex,I opened the pattern for the rocket on my computer, and chose A4 as the paper size. I then went into the print preview and it still looked good - none of the pattern was getting chopped off. So, even though A4 paper size is a little narrower than the paper I am using it should still work fine even with the pattern at full 1:96 scale. If you run into trouble, just let me know and I will see what I can do. Best of luck to you.-Ryan

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hey! Thank You! Yes, Ton's work is very good, and gives us something to work with so we don't have to start from scratch. Honestly, there is more in the way of small details that could be added to this model, but I ran out of patience and confidence and moved on to other projects. You are welcome to work on it yourself if you go to build the Saturn V. The Saturn 1B sounds awesome. I'd love to build that one myself when you get done with it! What other rockets have you built?

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    The assembled model weighs 150 grams. Does that answer your question?

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thanks. You are very observant. I will add the required number of pages shortly. Please let me know if there are any other improvements you would add.

    I'm sorry that you are finding it difficult. I'm happy to help but I need to have specific questions to answer in order to be much help.

    I'm sorry I don't understand the question.

    Yes, the "doughnuts" are very important, because without them the rocket would not maintain a round shape, and would be very flimsy.

    View Instructable »
    • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model
      8,598 views
      128 favorites
      27 comments
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Wow that's very impressive! I know that kind of thing is possible but it's really cool to hear that someone actually did it! Thank you for sharing.

    Wow that's awesome! Thank you for sharing it with others!

    Thank you for saying so! It's not perfect but I'm very glad that you like it!

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    You are very welcome! I'm glad that you like it.

    I suppose that's true that a large company could have designed and printed such a model. It wasn't until much later that a homeowner could do it though, and for someone like me to make changes to the design.

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Ah thanks! Yeah I need to work on the LEM.

    Thanks! I was surprised myself when I got into paper rocket models how good they look despite being paper. And yup, like most modeling it can be a bit tedious and tricky. I'm glad you like the instructable though! Hopefully it will help someone add the Saturn V to their collection.

    Thank you for your kind words! I'm glad you like it.

    Thank you! You are very welcome!

    View Instructable »
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you!! I'm so glad that you like it. I'm working on more options for this model, and there is a lunar module that is the same scale - it just needs instructions. So, I'm sure that by the time you get around to building one it will be even better!

    View Instructable »
  • Spaceship Porthole Window

    Cool! Now I want to build one to hang on my wall, with some old tech built into it to display the from-space view! Awesome!

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Thank you! That's very kind of you to say, and I'm glad you like it.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Green Pea Burgers
    Green Pea Burgers

    Thanks uncle kudzu! Love the comment.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild's instructable Green Pea Burgers's weekly stats:
    • Green Pea Burgers
      98 views
      3 favorites
      1 comments
  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Are you located in the United States? I live in Arkansas. If you are in a different country then that might make trading difficult because of shipping costs. Otherwise, I'd love to trade a thorium lantern mantle for just about any element I don't already have. I have extra of other elements as well, some of which you already have but might still be interested in considering because they are in human-made objects. I have pure sulfur powder, platinum spark plugs, nickel coins, zirconium flash bulbs, germanium diodes, carbon rods and carbon fiber arrow shafts, and maybe even though it looks like you have the Noble gasses I have xenon flash bulbs and neon bulbs too. I've tried to do trades with other collectors before but it didn't work well either because they lived in another country or the…

    see more »

    Are you located in the United States? I live in Arkansas. If you are in a different country then that might make trading difficult because of shipping costs. Otherwise, I'd love to trade a thorium lantern mantle for just about any element I don't already have. I have extra of other elements as well, some of which you already have but might still be interested in considering because they are in human-made objects. I have pure sulfur powder, platinum spark plugs, nickel coins, zirconium flash bulbs, germanium diodes, carbon rods and carbon fiber arrow shafts, and maybe even though it looks like you have the Noble gasses I have xenon flash bulbs and neon bulbs too. I've tried to do trades with other collectors before but it didn't work well either because they lived in another country or they didn't have any extra samples to trade with. So maybe instead of me listing all the elments I don't have, which is a lot, you could tell me where you live and what you have extra of? The thorium mantles aren't especially valuable as it turns out, somewhere between 5 & $10 USD. Like I say I'd trade for just about anything I don't have, and I mostly have the common elements as I haven't bought very many off the internet.

    View Instructable »
  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Two types of samples is a great idea, when possible. For thorium, I have Coleman lantern mantles with thorium dioxide. The Geiger counter really goes nuts with those. I have an extra one, and I'm open to trades. They don't use thorium dioxide in mantles anymore, so supplies are limited. As for flourine, your natural sample could be a flourite (calcium fluoride) crystal. That's interesting about the radium dials not being made after 1968. I think I might have better luck with finding clocks or gauges rather than watches.

    View Instructable »
  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Hey that's an interesting way to fill the spaces for the unobtainable elements. I'm using pictures as well but I don't have any text to go with them. That's great that you found some smoke detectors - you probably kept that americium out of a lanfill. 50 elements is pretty good. I've got about 40 myself. I only get a new sample once in a while, when I've got a few extra bucks lying about. I'm glad that you found my instuctables helpful. Id like to make the one about collecting into a book, an element collector's handbook of sorts. I am just putting the finishing touches on my built-from-scratch Geiger counter, and hope to make it into an instructable as well so you can make one yourself. It's super fun to have one and hopefully it will help me find some radium watch dials.

    Oh, and here's a consideration. I've been meaning to make some little gold stars to place in the main part of the table, in the two boxes that represent where the lanthanides and actinides go. In the top box I would put one star, and in the lower one two stars. Then, down on the lower part of the table where the lanthanides and actinides actually are, I would attach stars to the left hand side of those rows, respectively. Here is a picture of my display. As you can see I have got a lot of work to do.

    Haha I guess I tried to attach a picture of my display but it didn't attach. I'll try again later.

    View Instructable »
  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Nice job! It looks really good. You found a good way to hold the samples using magnets, and a good way to make the three metal support rods straight. I really don't have any advice for improving the display. Thank you so much for sharing your build! I'm guessing you saw my other instructable about finding samples.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild's entry Diddley Bow is a winner in the Instrument Contest contest
  • hulkbuild's entry Diddley Bow is a finalist in the Instrument Contest contest
  • Heat-Powered Stove Top Fan W/ Salvaged Parts

    Hey that's a simple fix. I should do something like that if I get around to improving my fan. Thanks for sharing.

    View Instructable »
  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Hey there! Making the display shelf, huh? Awesome! I'll attempt to answer your questions...1. Upon close inspection, no. After three years there is no sign that the hole in the hinge flange is being cut by the monofilament, or the other way around. The display weighs 2.5 pounds without samples.2. It depends. You are correct that you don't need to worry about scuffing a side of the box that will be glued to another box. In some cases, like with one of the boxes that makes the top part of the display, the side you remove the hinge from will be exposed so you might want to do a nice job on that one. I recommend laying out your boxes and deciding which ones will go where. This will help you determine what sides of what boxes you have to be careful with.3. Looking at the display, it appears th…

    see more »

    Hey there! Making the display shelf, huh? Awesome! I'll attempt to answer your questions...1. Upon close inspection, no. After three years there is no sign that the hole in the hinge flange is being cut by the monofilament, or the other way around. The display weighs 2.5 pounds without samples.2. It depends. You are correct that you don't need to worry about scuffing a side of the box that will be glued to another box. In some cases, like with one of the boxes that makes the top part of the display, the side you remove the hinge from will be exposed so you might want to do a nice job on that one. I recommend laying out your boxes and deciding which ones will go where. This will help you determine what sides of what boxes you have to be careful with.3. Looking at the display, it appears that I did grind or file the rounded connector posts as well, making those sides as flat as I could.4. The display is holding up well. It isn't exposed to sunlight so I haven't got any damage from that, like yellowing or embrittlement. I haven't added anything to it, though I think I will cut another box and add on the rest of the row so that I have spaces for elements 112 through 118. You might want to do that now.I'm here if you have more questions, or if my answers were not sufficient. Happy making! I'd love to see your shelf when it is done.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    NICE! It looks good. Thank you for sharing. Are you going to try to add a pickup of some kind?

    Thank you! Very kind of you to say.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Thanks!!! I'll try to get a video up soon of what it sounds like.

    I tried an eye screw, but it didn't work like you might think. It works for something to hook the end of the string onto, but a deck or drywall screw works just as good. The eye screw didn't help with tightening either. Thanks for the idea though. Happy holidays and happy making.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Thank you for your kind words. I'm not proud of all of my instructables, but I'm glad you like them. Cheers!

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    You guys are right! I guess it was the other way around. My bad. I'll fix it.

    Sorry, I don't have a proper guitar amp and I'm not very good at playing the Diddley Bow, that's why I included a link of someone playing one in the introduction. I should try to make a video tho

    Ah, well i don't have a proper guitar amp and I'm not good at playing the Diddley Bow, but I did include a link of someone building and playing one in the intro.

    Good idea, I should add that. Getting the string the right tension is usually the trickiest part.

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild entered Diddley Bow in the Instrument Contest contest
  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    That's quite a list! Have you collected all of those?? I'm still collecting and I'd love to see a picture of your collection if you have one! Sorry for the late reply btw

    View Instructable »
  • How to Repair Beats Headphones

    Hey lion42615! I'm not really interested in tearing my headphones apart again for more pictures, but if you are having trouble knowing what to do I would be glad to help, I just need more details of your situation and a specific question.

    View Instructable »
  • I see you have most of the elements that I do, and many i don't. Americium and xenon might be the only ones that I have to trade that you would want. Would you be interested? I was a little bit afraid of radiation at first but i am sure you know that they only emit alpha particles, which can't travel very far and cannot penetrate more than an inch or two of air. A piece of paper or two will stop them, and even if they hit you they don't do anything unless you're exposed for a long-term. Sorry to hear that it is hard for you to get electronics. I also Love electronics and get my stuff from eBay. Can't wait to try making sodium! Thanks again for the link..

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks for the link! I'll check it out. You're right, I haven't collected any hydrogen or oxygen. Hydrogen is a bit boring by itself, but the tritium isotope is pretty cool because it's radioactive and used in tritium glow tubes, small transparent cylinders lined with fluorescent material. The tritium inside excites the material and makes the whole thing glow. Expensive, but it would be my ideal sample.I have kicked around the idea of heating manganese dioxide from batteries along with carbon in order to reduce it to manganese metal. Haven't tried it yet.I'm using a piece of granite rock to represent radon because radon is unobtainable but mostly comes from granite.I don't have any iridium plugs. I should look for those. Thanks for mentioning them.I have torn apart nickel/cadmium batterie…

    see more »

    Thanks for the link! I'll check it out. You're right, I haven't collected any hydrogen or oxygen. Hydrogen is a bit boring by itself, but the tritium isotope is pretty cool because it's radioactive and used in tritium glow tubes, small transparent cylinders lined with fluorescent material. The tritium inside excites the material and makes the whole thing glow. Expensive, but it would be my ideal sample.I have kicked around the idea of heating manganese dioxide from batteries along with carbon in order to reduce it to manganese metal. Haven't tried it yet.I'm using a piece of granite rock to represent radon because radon is unobtainable but mostly comes from granite.I don't have any iridium plugs. I should look for those. Thanks for mentioning them.I have torn apart nickel/cadmium batteries in search of cadmium, but never had any luck getting actual cadmium metal. The cadmium is mixed with iron inside.I do have some of those other elements you mentioned, but haven't gotten them mounted in the display yet. I try to mount my samples so that they look as pretty as possible. Thanks for what you said about my display,and don't worry about any grammar mistakes, I'm just glad to have another element collector to talk to! And thats cool that you live in Brazil! How are things in Brazil? I'm in the United States. We could trade element samples, as I have some extra of some like sulfur and Americium. The shipping might make it hard, though.

    View Instructable »
  • Yeah! I'm glad I could help. Seeing your post definitely made my day - your collection looks very professional. I am also still working on my collection, and have mostly turned to buying samples off the internet now. For example, I got my titanium from a listing like this one: titanium bar from eBay. I'd love to help you more if I could, as there are some things that didn't get added to the instructable. I've attached pics of my collection so you can see how it's coming along. I haven't gotten around to doing much with it lately, but I still loved seeing yours. Message me anytime!

    View Instructable »
  • Very nice work! Thanks for posting pictures! I love to see what others come up with. Did my instructable help you at all? Is your collection about completed, then?

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks! And yes I was surprised, too. Especially the fact that it isn't HUGE.

    View Instructable »
    • Download Wikipedia for Offline Use
      1,370 views
      17 favorites
      0 comments
  • Thanks for commenting! Yes, that would be a simple source, and definitely one of the better samples you are going to get from ordinary places. For your money though, I would probably recommend getting something like this:https://www.ebay.com/itm/Zirconium-Metal-99-995-Pure-Element-40-Zr-Chemistry-Sample/282014305696?hash=item41a95ccda0:g:PjAAAOSw2GlXGtr6:rk:26:pf:0

    View Instructable »
  • Absolutely, I will give it a vote as soon as it gets accepted into the contest. It looks like you did a great job, I will have to read it more thoroughly when I get a chance. It may help me improve my design. Also, I got the link to your YouTube video added into my instructable. My vernier calipers is not digital, so it is hard to make precise measurements, but I think the aluminum I made my fan blade from is about .045 inch thick. A little thicker than it needs to be, and my fan blade is a little big, but it works for now. Good luck and let me know how it goes!

    Good idea! Now that I think of it, coffee makers have wires inside that are heat protected, I should use those!

    Even if there was no plastic in the motor, the magnets inside it would loose their pull at high temperature, so it seems to me that keeping the motor cool is a big priority.

    Thanks dude! I will have to look into that, as any kind of silicone lubricant would probably help with heat transfer. Maybe lithium grease would work!

    View Instructable »
    • Heat-Powered Stove Top Fan W/ Salvaged Parts
      10,526 views
      131 favorites
      20 comments
  • Yes, your video was one of the ones I watched, and I was definitely inspired by the engine block and pipe elbow you went with in your design. It was a great idea, and i don't think I would have went that way if i had not seen your video, so I will gladly add a link to your video as soon as i get the chance. I feel a little bad that it didn't occur to me to do that in the first place, but thanks for being such a good sport about it. Oh, and sorry if I spoiled your trash to treasure plans. I Know how that feels. Good luck in the contest, and if you get something posted let me know and I will give it a vote. Glad to know you are part of the community. Happy making - Hulkbuild

    View Instructable »
  • I realize that the peltier plate normally is powered by 12 volts, but it works less efficient when used this way. I should try to measure the output, but i am guessing the voltage doesn't get above 4v. I don't think a pc fan will spin at that voltage. The reason why cd motors work so well is because they have a low rpm per volt, think low "gear". While other motors spin crazy fast they have high torque at low voltage.

    View Instructable »
  • Hey, thanks! I wonder if the reaction between The Works toilet bowl cleaner and aluminum foil is the same kind of reaction you describe. I have dissolved metals in hydrochloric acid before, and hydrochloric is nasty stuff considering the fumes and such. You have a good idea that hydrogen will rise to the top of other gasses, I guess I hadn't realized that. Collecting some hydrogen in a bottle shouldn't be too hard, then, although my dream sample is a tritium glow tube. Anyways, thanks for your comment, as I still hope to add more to this instructable in the future!

    View Instructable »
  • hulkbuild's instructable How to Repair Beats Headphones's weekly stats:
    • How to Repair Beats Headphones
      406 views
      1 favorites
      0 comments
  • Thanks Gizmo! The links were a great help. Happy New Year.

    View Instructable »
  • Hey Gizmologist, I was wondering if you kept any record of your eBay element purchases, like the seller and price you paid. I would be interested because I am looking into buying samples off eBay as well. Thanks!

    View Instructable »
  • Awesome! Thanks so much for sharing your collection with me! It looks pretty complete, WAY further along than mine. Money is the biggest constraint for me, besides limited net time to research/shop. There isn't much you can do with elements after 92, except pictures of their namesakes (which I am doing), but I am surprised you didn't include americium from a smoke detector. Maybe you could still consider adding that one? I know it's a man made element, but it has a long half life.Like you, I don't like the idea of invisible samples, so gases are not much fun to collect, but tritium for hydrogen sounds really cool! I always enjoy seeing what other people use as samples. Again, thank you for sharing. It's great to know I am not alone in my hobby. While you were collecting, did you communica…

    see more »

    Awesome! Thanks so much for sharing your collection with me! It looks pretty complete, WAY further along than mine. Money is the biggest constraint for me, besides limited net time to research/shop. There isn't much you can do with elements after 92, except pictures of their namesakes (which I am doing), but I am surprised you didn't include americium from a smoke detector. Maybe you could still consider adding that one? I know it's a man made element, but it has a long half life.Like you, I don't like the idea of invisible samples, so gases are not much fun to collect, but tritium for hydrogen sounds really cool! I always enjoy seeing what other people use as samples. Again, thank you for sharing. It's great to know I am not alone in my hobby. While you were collecting, did you communicate with any other collectors? I wish there was a forum for element collecting. Anyway, Happy Thanksgiving!

    View Instructable »
  • Hey gizmologist! How is your element collection going? I would love to see a picture. I recently built a display for mine, and you can check it out here if you want: https://www.instructables.com/id/Periodic-Table-Display-for-Element-Samples/

    How's the collecting going?Thanks for what you said about my display. I have often thought it would be cool to exhibit mine in a library or school, or somewhere that values education (after I get it filled out better, of course). It would be a pain to try to transport, but it sounds like yours would be far easier to transport.I am in Arkansas. Trading might be good if the value of the items shipped far exceeds the cost of shipping. I understand if you don't have excessive samples like I do. I have extra platinum spark plugs, carbon rods, sulfur powder, flash bulbs, etc. It would be fun to give them to another collector, and you are the first serious collector I have communicated with. Even if you only had one sample to send me, if it was valuable then it would be worth it. I think I will …

    see more »

    How's the collecting going?Thanks for what you said about my display. I have often thought it would be cool to exhibit mine in a library or school, or somewhere that values education (after I get it filled out better, of course). It would be a pain to try to transport, but it sounds like yours would be far easier to transport.I am in Arkansas. Trading might be good if the value of the items shipped far exceeds the cost of shipping. I understand if you don't have excessive samples like I do. I have extra platinum spark plugs, carbon rods, sulfur powder, flash bulbs, etc. It would be fun to give them to another collector, and you are the first serious collector I have communicated with. Even if you only had one sample to send me, if it was valuable then it would be worth it. I think I will be curating my element collection for my entire life and it will still not be super complete when I die, ( I'm 25 now) so every good sample I get is a huge milestone and can keep me excited for quite a while!Again, I would love to see a picture of your collection or the display you are working on. I honestly have not been working on my collection much as of late, but chatting with you has definitely encouraged me to make time for it. I have a lot of interests and hobbies so it can be a real mess sometimes. I recently took apart an old camera and got a unusually large xenon flashtube. I need to smash all the tantalum capacitors I have collected and see how much actual metal it amounts to.P.S. you said in an early message you were putting your samples in cylinders... was that just for storage, not display?

    View Instructable »
  • Sorry about the late reply, your response didn't show up in my inbox for some reason! Anyway, your snap together display sounds cool. I have seen some badass looking acrylic glass displays, and wanted one very much, so that is why I went the way I did with my display. I was inspired by stuff like:http://static1.squarespace.com/static/541ff2f5e4b09b50ed9ee4f2/t/547b5e35e4b0464e56d75fb0/1417371189572/So I built:https://www.instructables.com/id/Periodic-Table-Display-for-Element-Samples/You didn't say what yours would be made of, I assume wood? Element displays get big fast - every little bit you enlarge the individual spaces enlarges the display greatly. You are right about two thirds of the elements being found 'in the wild'. Roughly, if you consider that there are 120 elements, 80 of whic…

    see more »

    Sorry about the late reply, your response didn't show up in my inbox for some reason! Anyway, your snap together display sounds cool. I have seen some badass looking acrylic glass displays, and wanted one very much, so that is why I went the way I did with my display. I was inspired by stuff like:http://static1.squarespace.com/static/541ff2f5e4b09b50ed9ee4f2/t/547b5e35e4b0464e56d75fb0/1417371189572/So I built:https://www.instructables.com/id/Periodic-Table-Display-for-Element-Samples/You didn't say what yours would be made of, I assume wood? Element displays get big fast - every little bit you enlarge the individual spaces enlarges the display greatly. You are right about two thirds of the elements being found 'in the wild'. Roughly, if you consider that there are 120 elements, 80 of which can be considered collectible, half of those are in everyday places to some extent, though it depends on what your everyday is! I need to do more research on element sources, but it is slow considering I don't have home internet access - I use public access points like libraries. I do have Wikipedia (I downloaded it), but it is very limited for the kind of information I am usually looking for. Let me know if you find a good deal on any element samples online! Also let me know if you are interested in any kind of trade. I always thought it would be cool to trade samples with someone, like if they had access to something I didn't or vice versa. Theodore Grey is open to trades, but only if you have something impossible to get like technetium! Ha! If he doesn't have it, who does, right? I have found lots of surface mount tantalum capacitors on older hard drive circuit boards and underneath CPUs. Later!

    View Instructable »
  • Is your sister still collecting elements? I am trying to get in touch with fellow collectors to learn from them/help them. Also I would love to see her collection.

    Hi Schidtbag!I have two different kinds of flashbulbs. The big ones you can see in step twelve of my instructable. Did you read the whole thing? If not, keep reading! The bulbs may be too big for your cylinders, i will have to measure them. I also have two flashcubes that have four individual bulbs in them, and are much smaller. I collected them for zirconium/oxygen.I have been collecting for ten years now, adding a sample here and there along the way, usually discovering them in my everyday surroundings with the help of a little research. Many times I came to the realization that I had good samples laying around that I didn't even know I had.You said you are making potash? What does that entail? This probably doesn't help you any, but stump remover is mostly potassium nitrate (KNO3).Than…

    see more »

    Hi Schidtbag!I have two different kinds of flashbulbs. The big ones you can see in step twelve of my instructable. Did you read the whole thing? If not, keep reading! The bulbs may be too big for your cylinders, i will have to measure them. I also have two flashcubes that have four individual bulbs in them, and are much smaller. I collected them for zirconium/oxygen.I have been collecting for ten years now, adding a sample here and there along the way, usually discovering them in my everyday surroundings with the help of a little research. Many times I came to the realization that I had good samples laying around that I didn't even know I had.You said you are making potash? What does that entail? This probably doesn't help you any, but stump remover is mostly potassium nitrate (KNO3).Thanks for the heads up about my titanium. From the research i did before my purchase, this is what I understand: The titanium I bought is grade 2. Grades 1 through 4 are commercially pure (99.2% pure according to Wikipedia, unalloyed). They vary in tensile strength as a function of oxygen content, with Grade 1 being the most ductile (lowest tensile strength with an oxygen content of 0.18%), and Grade 4 the least ductile (highest tensile strength with an oxygen content of 0.40%). Ductility is relative however - titanium is brittle at room temperature. This means that if I tried to bend the sample I have to fit into my display it would probably just break. I have to heat it up first. All the grades after four are alloys. I read that Grade 2 is the 'workhorse' of the titanium industry, at least in ground based applications. Titanium metal is expensive to refine, and even more expensive to machine or make into anything, due to its particular properties. As for the price of the sample I bought, with a diameter of 1cm and length 10cm, it is about 7.85 cubic centimeters, so with titanium being 4.506 g/cm3, this means my sample is about 35.4 grams. I payed 2.22 USD shipping included, so thats roughly 6.3 cents a gram, or $63 per kilogram, or $28.63 a pound. Not super cheap, but it hasn't been made into a consumer good yet, which would increase the price considerably. You can wait on titanium if you like, but I waited ten long years to come across a sample 'in the wild' and never did except for the ones i mentioned that were integrated into 'nice stuff'. I love having a chunk of the real metal, something that I can hand to people and make them guess what metal it is. I found a similar sized steel rod and an aluminum one (in my junk heap) so I can let people compare the different densities. I really need to add all this to the instructable.Storing your samples in clear cylindrical containers sounds interesting. I built a display for mine for about $16 and am very pleased with it! You can check it out here.My M.O.:If I can get samples that are at or greater than 99% pure I am more than pleased, especially if the quantity is significant. This means that commercially pure elements are generally good enough for me. As fellow collector Theodore Gray noted in his book The Elements, nothing is ever 100%. Compounds of the elements, for me, are no fun because in most cases they have completely different properties than the elements themselves. Gasses are not a lot of fun either, because you can't really tell if it's in the jar/bottle/ampule or not. It just looks empty. I definitely won't be spending a lot on those! I love the metals. I want big chunks of them! Alloys are okay, especially if they contain enough of the element I am trying to represent so that the properties, at least the ones I care about like density, color, and so forth are not significantly effected.I don't know much about amalgamation, I will have to check into that, but as far as elements in computers go you have a whopping cache of elements there:lithium coin cell batteries that power the CMOSaluminum or copper heat sinks that cool the processorsneodymium magnets inside the hard disk drivesas you mentioned, circuit boards with gold substrates like RAM cardsSurface mount tantalum capacitors (sometimes a few big ones hiding under the processor or on HDD circuit boards)And then there are MLCCs (monlithic ceramic capacitors). Usually you'll find swarms of them around the the processor and large ICs. They contain noble metals like platinum, especially the ones in older units like from the '90s before the price went way up and they started substituting less noble metals. I have seen people on the web extracting the precious metals from them (and isolating the neodymium from the magnets). All of it looks like a lot of bother, especially if I have to buy a bunch of lab equipment and supplies, so I hate to be a downer but for me it just isn't realistic. You seem interested in it though, so good luck.

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks for your comment! I am glad I could help. I would love to see your collection if you have one, so maybe you could post a picture. Hydrogen Peroxide really is an easy way to get oxygen. In fact, a pinch of Manganese Dioxide (the black crud from a zinc/carbon battery) in a few tablespoons Hydrogen Peroxide frees up a crazy amount of O2 bubbles really quickly! Light bulbs do indeed contain Argon, but i am not sure what the percentage is. I still need to research that. Cobalt glass is blue, but does that mean that all blue glass is cobalt glass? How can you tell? I have a bunch of Bud Light Platinum bottles. Are they cobalt glass? I do have a Krypton bulb from a flashlight, but haven't added the step to this instructable yet. I have been interested in cadmium from nickel cadmium batter…

    see more »

    Thanks for your comment! I am glad I could help. I would love to see your collection if you have one, so maybe you could post a picture. Hydrogen Peroxide really is an easy way to get oxygen. In fact, a pinch of Manganese Dioxide (the black crud from a zinc/carbon battery) in a few tablespoons Hydrogen Peroxide frees up a crazy amount of O2 bubbles really quickly! Light bulbs do indeed contain Argon, but i am not sure what the percentage is. I still need to research that. Cobalt glass is blue, but does that mean that all blue glass is cobalt glass? How can you tell? I have a bunch of Bud Light Platinum bottles. Are they cobalt glass? I do have a Krypton bulb from a flashlight, but haven't added the step to this instructable yet. I have been interested in cadmium from nickel cadmium batteries for a long time, but from what I can tell the cadmium is mixed with iron inside the battery and I don't know how you could separate it. Osmium in ball point pens? I have heard of osmium tipped fountain pen nibs, but not ball points. I would be interested in where you heard that. Spark plugs would be a good source of Iridium, however I don't think there are any pure iridium spark plugs out there, maybe I am wrong. I would love to have a clock with radium painted hands - not sure how to identify it though. As you can see, I need to do more research on these things. Thanks for your ideas about elements. I love having people to talk to about elements, and I try to add anything I learn to this instructable to save everyone else the trouble researching to answer questions they have about the elements. If you have any more ideas, or just want to chat about elements, message me!

    Glad to hear that light bulbs have that much argon in them! I will just have to stick a bulb in my collection for now, and maybe look around on ebay someday.Also, thanks for looking into the Bud Light Platinum Bottles! Looks like I have some cobalt after all, at least something to fill cobalt's place for now. Like I said I have a ton of the bottles. Maybe we should organize a trade or something! I have lots of extra samples lying around like extra flash bulbs, carbon rods, pure sulfur powder, etc. Let me know what you think.I probably should give up on cadmium from batteries, like you said too dangerous! There are a lot of elements i would isolate at home if it didn't mean possibly burning my face off with acid! I am not averse to buying off of ebay, in fact I bought my first sample off t…

    see more »

    Glad to hear that light bulbs have that much argon in them! I will just have to stick a bulb in my collection for now, and maybe look around on ebay someday.Also, thanks for looking into the Bud Light Platinum Bottles! Looks like I have some cobalt after all, at least something to fill cobalt's place for now. Like I said I have a ton of the bottles. Maybe we should organize a trade or something! I have lots of extra samples lying around like extra flash bulbs, carbon rods, pure sulfur powder, etc. Let me know what you think.I probably should give up on cadmium from batteries, like you said too dangerous! There are a lot of elements i would isolate at home if it didn't mean possibly burning my face off with acid! I am not averse to buying off of ebay, in fact I bought my first sample off there about a month ago, a titanium rod:http://www.ebay.com/itm/0-4-x4-Titanium-Rod-Ti-Titan-Gr-2-GR2-Metal-Round-Bar-Dia-10mm-Length-100mm-/401249644934?hash=item5d6c57b186:g:yoIAAOSwcLxYGw-rI confirmed it was real titanium by rounding some of the cut edges on my bench grinder - it made white sparks like titanium is supposed to. It was really the only way I was going to get some titanium, as the titanium golf club I have is too nice to ruin and my sister won't let me take the titanium speakers out of her laptop because it still works :(I think you are right about the iridium plugs, I still want one though!gotta run! if I don't message for a while its not because I am not listening, i am just busy

    View Instructable »