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hulkbuild

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12Instructables163,709Views133CommentsArkansas
I love experimenting with science and physics, especially projects that involve electromagnetism, energy conservation and audio.

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100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Space Challenge
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Space Challenge
Instrument Contest
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Instrument Contest
Shelving Contest 2016
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Shelving Contest 2016
  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hmm. Maybe do multiple sugar rocket engines? When the lower ones burn out they could trigger others to start that are higher in the fuselage? That would be cool especially if it somehow burned through the fuselage and allowed the spent engines to fall away. But regardless, I agree that it could be simplified to just incorporate the aesthetic bits over a tube on a flying rocket and that would be cool enough. I'm currently working on a metal scale model of Starship for this year's space contest, which is now open.

    Yeah absolutely! Make it fly and then burn up and break into pieces just like the real one did lol

    Thanks! I'm glad you like it. I've never seen the models you are describing... I may have to check that out. I'm currently working on a metal scale model of Starship for this year's space contest which is now open. I'm making it in metal instead of paper or foilboard.

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Well, even though americium is radioactive, it really isn't dangerous unless you keep it right next to you for a long time or eat it. It mostly emits alpha particles which don't travel very far, usually less than ten centimeters. They won't get completely stopped by your vial, but the vial will stop most of the radiation. As long as you don't spend a lot of time in close proximity to the vial you won't be exposed to anything above normal background radiation. So, if you can get your hands on some it will be safe, and there is nothing to be afraid of really.I downloaded Whatsapp. I'll send you my number in a private message.

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    I do know of a way to extract cesium from cesium chloride, but I am afraid that CsCl isn't a household item. It's potentially a cheaper way to get cesium, but it isn't easy or all that affordable. Alternatively you can just use the CsCl to represent cesium like a friend of mine did. Yeah, switching to a different form of communication would be much more convenient. I don't have WhatsApp but I can download it if that's your preference. Otherwise I've got email, google hangouts, and Instagram. I'm harringtonryan88 on both Gmail and Instagram. I am glad that you found my guide helpful, and there's a lot of stuff that I have learned since writing it that I'd be happy to share!

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Hi Kesara! That's awesome! Thank you for sharing. I am still collecting, and it is really fun. Hopefully you can keep collecting and find more samples! Feel free to message me if you get stuck or need help finding samples! I may have some ideas for you.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Keep in mind that the doughnuts fit pretty tightly, and it may take several attempts to get it to go in. If it isn't going into the tube then maybe there is something wrong with the doughnut or the tube, so you could try remaking one of them. Otherwise, I would need to see a picture of what you are dealing with to be of more assistance. Hopefully I can help you!

    There are usually two different thicknesses of cardstock, "regular" (a bit thicker than regular paper, something like "92lb" or "250gsm") and "heavy" (which is about as thick as a postcard, or "110lb" or "298gsm"). For the big parts of the rocket I used the heavy, and the smaller details I used regular. You can see in the pattern file which pages to print on each particular weight. If you want you can print it all on the same weight.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hi there. Here in the United States we use standard letter size which is 8.5x11 inches (216x279mm), which is very close to A4. A4 is slightly longer and narrower at 8.3x11.7 inches (210x297mm) but it should work just fine. A3 would be unnecessarily large, but if you read the other comments you will see that FrankV14 put two pages on each A3. Just make sure you are using cardstock and set the scaling correctly as shown in step 3. Good luck to you :)

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  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    I'm sorry to hear that. Do you mean that you aren't getting any voltage from the high voltage output of the fly swatter circuit? I'm afraid I don't know enough about your situation to be able to be of much help, but I'll try if you can supply me with a pic or more info

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Thanks for your comment! I think there is a mineral called thorite as well - very radioactive. I've got more that I could add to this instructable, but I'm actually making it into content for YouTube which I will hopefully start publishing soon. In the mean time I'm happy to help fellow element collectors any way I can...

    That's awesome! Aluminum foil is actually very pure aluminum so you are doing well. I've got more that I could add to this instructable, but I'm actually making it into content for YouTube which I will hopefully start publishing soon! In the mean time I'd love to be of more help if I can...

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    I'm glad you like the project! I'm afraid I'm not much of a designer, but there are paper models of ships out there. I recommend doing a Google search for what you are interested in and do some digging. Often you will find paper models on old defunct websites.

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  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    I'm glad to help, and I'm honored that you chose to try making a Geiger counter from my instructable. It makes all the time I put into it all the more worth it. Wow, Hinkley C looks like quite an undertaking! I hadn't heard of it. Nuclear power isn't perfect but I'm glad that we have it. I'm also glad that the power company is invested in the community. It's funny that I didn't know what you meant by "every cloud" so I googled it. I may have heard "every cloud has a silver lining" but I'm guessing it might be a particularly English idiom. Anyway, tangent aside, happy making!

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  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    You're welcome! Hopefully you can get it working. Sadly no, regular diodes like the 1N4148s will not work. You will have to get zener diodes, and ones with high values so that you don't have to use a ton of them. I ended up buying a multi-pack of zeners off of eBay for this project, though you could buy a pack like this and it would give you just what you need:https://www.amazon.com/5PCS-1N5378B-DIODE-ZENER-1N5378/dp/B01680H7N8The SI 25G tube should work just fine, and from a little looking around, the working voltage range seems to be 382-398 volts and the anode resistor is 1.5M ohms. Maybe your paperwork would confirm this? No, your voltage should not drop to zero. It seems like your fly swatter is putting out some good voltage, though it seems there is a problem with the rest of your c…

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    You're welcome! Hopefully you can get it working. Sadly no, regular diodes like the 1N4148s will not work. You will have to get zener diodes, and ones with high values so that you don't have to use a ton of them. I ended up buying a multi-pack of zeners off of eBay for this project, though you could buy a pack like this and it would give you just what you need:https://www.amazon.com/5PCS-1N5378B-DIODE-ZENER-1N5378/dp/B01680H7N8The SI 25G tube should work just fine, and from a little looking around, the working voltage range seems to be 382-398 volts and the anode resistor is 1.5M ohms. Maybe your paperwork would confirm this? No, your voltage should not drop to zero. It seems like your fly swatter is putting out some good voltage, though it seems there is a problem with the rest of your circuit (probably the diodes) that is allowing the voltage to get grounded out to basically zero. Ah, so you live in England. Good luck finding a radiation source. I'm glad to help, so don't be afraid to reach out.

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  • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts

    That's a good question. I think that in most cases a resistor there would be a good precaution, and one at the base of the transistor too. The funny thing about this circuit is that despite putting out several hundred volts, the amperage is super extremely low. That means the high voltage isn't dangerous and the resistors aren't needed. The circuit works fine and possibly better without them. At least, that's my experience.

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    • Working Geiger Counter W/ Minimal Parts
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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you so much for your kind words! I'm also pretty happy with how the model turned out. It was a lot of work but I couldn't be happier with it in my collection. Cute lamp by the way.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you so much for saying so! I'm glad you like it. I'll certainly be posting more projects, hopefully another one as soon as next month.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hi friend! Your work on the pattern looks very good. I hope it works well for you, and of course anyone else trying to use A3 size paper. If your home printer is an inkjet, it's possible that some of the inkjet nozzles that print red have gotten clogged. My printer was given to me and didn't print at all when I first got it, even with new ink cartridges. I had to do an extreme unclog where you use a syringe to force hot water and ammonia through the port where the ink cartridge normally goes on. Anyways, good luck building the model and don't be afraid to reach out if you have any questions or need assistance.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Holy heck! It looks amazing! You did a fantastic job! Thank you so much for sharing, it really means a lot to see that someone actually made the model - it makes all the work I did even more worthwile.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hey Alex,I opened the pattern for the rocket on my computer, and chose A4 as the paper size. I then went into the print preview and it still looked good - none of the pattern was getting chopped off. So, even though A4 paper size is a little narrower than the paper I am using it should still work fine even with the pattern at full 1:96 scale. If you run into trouble, just let me know and I will see what I can do. Best of luck to you.-Ryan

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Hey! Thank You! Yes, Ton's work is very good, and gives us something to work with so we don't have to start from scratch. Honestly, there is more in the way of small details that could be added to this model, but I ran out of patience and confidence and moved on to other projects. You are welcome to work on it yourself if you go to build the Saturn V. The Saturn 1B sounds awesome. I'd love to build that one myself when you get done with it! What other rockets have you built?

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    The assembled model weighs 150 grams. Does that answer your question?

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Yes, the "doughnuts" are very important, because without them the rocket would not maintain a round shape, and would be very flimsy.

    I'm sorry that you are finding it difficult. I'm happy to help but I need to have specific questions to answer in order to be much help.

    I'm sorry I don't understand the question.

    Thanks. You are very observant. I will add the required number of pages shortly. Please let me know if there are any other improvements you would add.

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    • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model
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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Wow that's awesome! Thank you for sharing it with others!

    Thank you for saying so! It's not perfect but I'm very glad that you like it!

    Wow that's very impressive! I know that kind of thing is possible but it's really cool to hear that someone actually did it! Thank you for sharing.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    You are very welcome! I'm glad that you like it.

    I suppose that's true that a large company could have designed and printed such a model. It wasn't until much later that a homeowner could do it though, and for someone like me to make changes to the design.

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Haha THANK YOU! I'm so glad you like it. There is a LEM that goes with this model too - I just have to make instructions for it.

    Ah thanks! Yeah I need to work on the LEM.

    Thanks! I was surprised myself when I got into paper rocket models how good they look despite being paper. And yup, like most modeling it can be a bit tedious and tricky. I'm glad you like the instructable though! Hopefully it will help someone add the Saturn V to their collection.

    Thank you! You are very welcome!

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  • Print and Assemble the Saturn V Moon Rocket - 1:96 Scale Paper Model

    Thank you!! I'm so glad that you like it. I'm working on more options for this model, and there is a lunar module that is the same scale - it just needs instructions. So, I'm sure that by the time you get around to building one it will be even better!

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  • Spaceship Porthole Window

    Cool! Now I want to build one to hang on my wall, with some old tech built into it to display the from-space view! Awesome!

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Thank you! That's very kind of you to say, and I'm glad you like it.

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Green Pea Burgers
    Green Pea Burgers

    Thanks uncle kudzu! Love the comment.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Are you located in the United States? I live in Arkansas. If you are in a different country then that might make trading difficult because of shipping costs. Otherwise, I'd love to trade a thorium lantern mantle for just about any element I don't already have. I have extra of other elements as well, some of which you already have but might still be interested in considering because they are in human-made objects. I have pure sulfur powder, platinum spark plugs, nickel coins, zirconium flash bulbs, germanium diodes, carbon rods and carbon fiber arrow shafts, and maybe even though it looks like you have the Noble gasses I have xenon flash bulbs and neon bulbs too. I've tried to do trades with other collectors before but it didn't work well either because they lived in another country or the…

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    Are you located in the United States? I live in Arkansas. If you are in a different country then that might make trading difficult because of shipping costs. Otherwise, I'd love to trade a thorium lantern mantle for just about any element I don't already have. I have extra of other elements as well, some of which you already have but might still be interested in considering because they are in human-made objects. I have pure sulfur powder, platinum spark plugs, nickel coins, zirconium flash bulbs, germanium diodes, carbon rods and carbon fiber arrow shafts, and maybe even though it looks like you have the Noble gasses I have xenon flash bulbs and neon bulbs too. I've tried to do trades with other collectors before but it didn't work well either because they lived in another country or they didn't have any extra samples to trade with. So maybe instead of me listing all the elments I don't have, which is a lot, you could tell me where you live and what you have extra of? The thorium mantles aren't especially valuable as it turns out, somewhere between 5 & $10 USD. Like I say I'd trade for just about anything I don't have, and I mostly have the common elements as I haven't bought very many off the internet.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Two types of samples is a great idea, when possible. For thorium, I have Coleman lantern mantles with thorium dioxide. The Geiger counter really goes nuts with those. I have an extra one, and I'm open to trades. They don't use thorium dioxide in mantles anymore, so supplies are limited. As for flourine, your natural sample could be a flourite (calcium fluoride) crystal. That's interesting about the radium dials not being made after 1968. I think I might have better luck with finding clocks or gauges rather than watches.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Haha I guess I tried to attach a picture of my display but it didn't attach. I'll try again later.

    Oh, and here's a consideration. I've been meaning to make some little gold stars to place in the main part of the table, in the two boxes that represent where the lanthanides and actinides go. In the top box I would put one star, and in the lower one two stars. Then, down on the lower part of the table where the lanthanides and actinides actually are, I would attach stars to the left hand side of those rows, respectively. Here is a picture of my display. As you can see I have got a lot of work to do.

    Hey that's an interesting way to fill the spaces for the unobtainable elements. I'm using pictures as well but I don't have any text to go with them. That's great that you found some smoke detectors - you probably kept that americium out of a lanfill. 50 elements is pretty good. I've got about 40 myself. I only get a new sample once in a while, when I've got a few extra bucks lying about. I'm glad that you found my instuctables helpful. Id like to make the one about collecting into a book, an element collector's handbook of sorts. I am just putting the finishing touches on my built-from-scratch Geiger counter, and hope to make it into an instructable as well so you can make one yourself. It's super fun to have one and hopefully it will help me find some radium watch dials.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Nice job! It looks really good. You found a good way to hold the samples using magnets, and a good way to make the three metal support rods straight. I really don't have any advice for improving the display. Thank you so much for sharing your build! I'm guessing you saw my other instructable about finding samples.

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  • hulkbuild's entry Diddley Bow is a winner in the Instrument Contest contest
  • hulkbuild's entry Diddley Bow is a finalist in the Instrument Contest contest
  • Heat-Powered Stove Top Fan W/ Salvaged Parts

    Hey that's a simple fix. I should do something like that if I get around to improving my fan. Thanks for sharing.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Hey there! Making the display shelf, huh? Awesome! I'll attempt to answer your questions...1. Upon close inspection, no. After three years there is no sign that the hole in the hinge flange is being cut by the monofilament, or the other way around. The display weighs 2.5 pounds without samples.2. It depends. You are correct that you don't need to worry about scuffing a side of the box that will be glued to another box. In some cases, like with one of the boxes that makes the top part of the display, the side you remove the hinge from will be exposed so you might want to do a nice job on that one. I recommend laying out your boxes and deciding which ones will go where. This will help you determine what sides of what boxes you have to be careful with.3. Looking at the display, it appears th…

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    Hey there! Making the display shelf, huh? Awesome! I'll attempt to answer your questions...1. Upon close inspection, no. After three years there is no sign that the hole in the hinge flange is being cut by the monofilament, or the other way around. The display weighs 2.5 pounds without samples.2. It depends. You are correct that you don't need to worry about scuffing a side of the box that will be glued to another box. In some cases, like with one of the boxes that makes the top part of the display, the side you remove the hinge from will be exposed so you might want to do a nice job on that one. I recommend laying out your boxes and deciding which ones will go where. This will help you determine what sides of what boxes you have to be careful with.3. Looking at the display, it appears that I did grind or file the rounded connector posts as well, making those sides as flat as I could.4. The display is holding up well. It isn't exposed to sunlight so I haven't got any damage from that, like yellowing or embrittlement. I haven't added anything to it, though I think I will cut another box and add on the rest of the row so that I have spaces for elements 112 through 118. You might want to do that now.I'm here if you have more questions, or if my answers were not sufficient. Happy making! I'd love to see your shelf when it is done.

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    NICE! It looks good. Thank you for sharing. Are you going to try to add a pickup of some kind?

    Thank you! Very kind of you to say.

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    I tried an eye screw, but it didn't work like you might think. It works for something to hook the end of the string onto, but a deck or drywall screw works just as good. The eye screw didn't help with tightening either. Thanks for the idea though. Happy holidays and happy making.

    Thanks!!! I'll try to get a video up soon of what it sounds like.

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Thank you for your kind words. I'm not proud of all of my instructables, but I'm glad you like them. Cheers!

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Diddley Bow
    Diddley Bow

    Good idea, I should add that. Getting the string the right tension is usually the trickiest part.

    Ah, well i don't have a proper guitar amp and I'm not good at playing the Diddley Bow, but I did include a link of someone building and playing one in the intro.

    Sorry, I don't have a proper guitar amp and I'm not very good at playing the Diddley Bow, that's why I included a link of someone playing one in the introduction. I should try to make a video tho

    You guys are right! I guess it was the other way around. My bad. I'll fix it.

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  • hulkbuild entered Diddley Bow in the Instrument Contest contest
  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    That's quite a list! Have you collected all of those?? I'm still collecting and I'd love to see a picture of your collection if you have one! Sorry for the late reply btw

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  • How to Repair Beats Headphones

    Hey lion42615! I'm not really interested in tearing my headphones apart again for more pictures, but if you are having trouble knowing what to do I would be glad to help, I just need more details of your situation and a specific question.

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  • I see you have most of the elements that I do, and many i don't. Americium and xenon might be the only ones that I have to trade that you would want. Would you be interested? I was a little bit afraid of radiation at first but i am sure you know that they only emit alpha particles, which can't travel very far and cannot penetrate more than an inch or two of air. A piece of paper or two will stop them, and even if they hit you they don't do anything unless you're exposed for a long-term. Sorry to hear that it is hard for you to get electronics. I also Love electronics and get my stuff from eBay. Can't wait to try making sodium! Thanks again for the link..

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  • Thanks for the link! I'll check it out. You're right, I haven't collected any hydrogen or oxygen. Hydrogen is a bit boring by itself, but the tritium isotope is pretty cool because it's radioactive and used in tritium glow tubes, small transparent cylinders lined with fluorescent material. The tritium inside excites the material and makes the whole thing glow. Expensive, but it would be my ideal sample.I have kicked around the idea of heating manganese dioxide from batteries along with carbon in order to reduce it to manganese metal. Haven't tried it yet.I'm using a piece of granite rock to represent radon because radon is unobtainable but mostly comes from granite.I don't have any iridium plugs. I should look for those. Thanks for mentioning them.I have torn apart nickel/cadmium batterie…

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    Thanks for the link! I'll check it out. You're right, I haven't collected any hydrogen or oxygen. Hydrogen is a bit boring by itself, but the tritium isotope is pretty cool because it's radioactive and used in tritium glow tubes, small transparent cylinders lined with fluorescent material. The tritium inside excites the material and makes the whole thing glow. Expensive, but it would be my ideal sample.I have kicked around the idea of heating manganese dioxide from batteries along with carbon in order to reduce it to manganese metal. Haven't tried it yet.I'm using a piece of granite rock to represent radon because radon is unobtainable but mostly comes from granite.I don't have any iridium plugs. I should look for those. Thanks for mentioning them.I have torn apart nickel/cadmium batteries in search of cadmium, but never had any luck getting actual cadmium metal. The cadmium is mixed with iron inside.I do have some of those other elements you mentioned, but haven't gotten them mounted in the display yet. I try to mount my samples so that they look as pretty as possible. Thanks for what you said about my display,and don't worry about any grammar mistakes, I'm just glad to have another element collector to talk to! And thats cool that you live in Brazil! How are things in Brazil? I'm in the United States. We could trade element samples, as I have some extra of some like sulfur and Americium. The shipping might make it hard, though.

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  • Yeah! I'm glad I could help. Seeing your post definitely made my day - your collection looks very professional. I am also still working on my collection, and have mostly turned to buying samples off the internet now. For example, I got my titanium from a listing like this one: titanium bar from eBay. I'd love to help you more if I could, as there are some things that didn't get added to the instructable. I've attached pics of my collection so you can see how it's coming along. I haven't gotten around to doing much with it lately, but I still loved seeing yours. Message me anytime!

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  • Very nice work! Thanks for posting pictures! I love to see what others come up with. Did my instructable help you at all? Is your collection about completed, then?

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  • Thanks! And yes I was surprised, too. Especially the fact that it isn't HUGE.

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    • Download Wikipedia for Offline Use
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  • Thanks for commenting! Yes, that would be a simple source, and definitely one of the better samples you are going to get from ordinary places. For your money though, I would probably recommend getting something like this:https://www.ebay.com/itm/Zirconium-Metal-99-995-Pure-Element-40-Zr-Chemistry-Sample/282014305696?hash=item41a95ccda0:g:PjAAAOSw2GlXGtr6:rk:26:pf:0

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  • Good idea! Now that I think of it, coffee makers have wires inside that are heat protected, I should use those!

    Absolutely, I will give it a vote as soon as it gets accepted into the contest. It looks like you did a great job, I will have to read it more thoroughly when I get a chance. It may help me improve my design. Also, I got the link to your YouTube video added into my instructable. My vernier calipers is not digital, so it is hard to make precise measurements, but I think the aluminum I made my fan blade from is about .045 inch thick. A little thicker than it needs to be, and my fan blade is a little big, but it works for now. Good luck and let me know how it goes!

    Nice work dude, thanks for sharing!

    Even if there was no plastic in the motor, the magnets inside it would loose their pull at high temperature, so it seems to me that keeping the motor cool is a big priority.

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    • Heat-Powered Stove Top Fan W/ Salvaged Parts
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  • Yes, your video was one of the ones I watched, and I was definitely inspired by the engine block and pipe elbow you went with in your design. It was a great idea, and i don't think I would have went that way if i had not seen your video, so I will gladly add a link to your video as soon as i get the chance. I feel a little bad that it didn't occur to me to do that in the first place, but thanks for being such a good sport about it. Oh, and sorry if I spoiled your trash to treasure plans. I Know how that feels. Good luck in the contest, and if you get something posted let me know and I will give it a vote. Glad to know you are part of the community. Happy making - Hulkbuild

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  • I realize that the peltier plate normally is powered by 12 volts, but it works less efficient when used this way. I should try to measure the output, but i am guessing the voltage doesn't get above 4v. I don't think a pc fan will spin at that voltage. The reason why cd motors work so well is because they have a low rpm per volt, think low "gear". While other motors spin crazy fast they have high torque at low voltage.

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