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ironsmiter

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  • Making a Samurai Sword From Scrap Metal

    In general 2-4 hours of file work, for every hour of forging. Unless you are going for the "rough forged" look that is sometimes popular.If you want to see the fascinating reason for the curve on those swords,watch https://youtu.be/VE_4zHNcieM?t=1337 Prior to quenching, those blades are nearly straight. It's the differential between edge thickness and back thickness, along with the differential quenching that gives it that curve. (the very thin western bladesmiths try so hard to AVOID, because OUR warping tends to be side-to-side waviness)

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  • Gluten Free Melted Chocolate Tempura Toast

    round these parts, we call it "Nutella stuffed french toast" feel free to add a few thin slices of banana to the inner layer, fora special breakfast treat :-)

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  • DIY Universal HEPA Filter Prototype Made With Open Source 3D Printed Parts

    looks good :-)Three IMPORTANT things to note.1) right now, people are trying anything they can to replace n95 masks, and while better than nothing, this is NOT an adequate substitute (reference this 2003 article about the SARS corona virus outbreak https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC156669/ )2) This WOULD make an awesome wood turning mask3) FACIAL HAIR. I feel you on this one, but either petroleum jelly or shaving, to create a proper seal. Without one or the other, the beard creates around 15-20% completely unfiltered leaking. your 95% hepa filter would be operating at around 80% (slightly better than a homemade t-shirt material 'surgical mask' at 75%)For the glue... I would use what the industry uses... hot-melt.

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  • Repacking 7.2V NiCD Drill Battery With Lithium 18650

    Having done a conversion to Li-Ion on HALF my 24 volt Bosh batteries... I give you this piece of advise.Get a bright red "DO NOT CHARGE IN STANDARD CHARGER" sticker for your 'new' battery.I almost lost a charger when a borrower stuck the 18650 celled battery into the 'universal voltage' 7.2-24 volt charger. Luckily, the charger circuit blew a relatively minor component that was easily replaced with 30 seconds worth of soldering, and 30 min worth of swearing.Second, when you feel/hear ANY power sag. STOP, and swap cells/recharge. At least, if you don't want to keep buying 18650s. (if you pull them from 'dead' laptop batteries, the loss of capacity or complete death of a cell isn't such a waste, so abuse them to your hearts content).

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  • Bronze Bell From 3D Printing

    Just a note, the second heat setting IS super important.at ~225 F, normal water is driven out of the plaster, but there is still plentyof water bound up chemically. That's where the higher temperatures come in."Normal" quick burnout cycle for investment goes something like this.Put the mold in a cold burnout over, bring it up to 300 F, and hold for 2 hours. most wax, and many plastics will melt/burn at this step.Ramp temp up to 700 F for 2 hours This should completely burn out all organics, including leaves, and plastics.Up the temp again to 900 F for an hour. Mainly to avoid thermal shockSet temp to 1350 F for 3-4 hours. This is the temperature at which the chemically bonded water is released, and converted into it's final form.If you…

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    Just a note, the second heat setting IS super important.at ~225 F, normal water is driven out of the plaster, but there is still plentyof water bound up chemically. That's where the higher temperatures come in."Normal" quick burnout cycle for investment goes something like this.Put the mold in a cold burnout over, bring it up to 300 F, and hold for 2 hours. most wax, and many plastics will melt/burn at this step.Ramp temp up to 700 F for 2 hours This should completely burn out all organics, including leaves, and plastics.Up the temp again to 900 F for an hour. Mainly to avoid thermal shockSet temp to 1350 F for 3-4 hours. This is the temperature at which the chemically bonded water is released, and converted into it's final form.If you want to get persnickety, this is often followed by 30 min to an hour at casting temp (for bronze, this should be around 2200) I would skip this step, if using straight plaster. Anything over 1500 may negatively affect a pure plaster mold. Instead of hammering, and sawing the mold into pieces... well, my normal advice would need to be modified, because of the size of your molds, but at the jewelry scale, we take the "cooled" mold (still hot enough to light paper on fire, but the metal is fully frozen) and drop it in a 5 gallon bucket of water. A few swishes, and all the investment comes right off. You could probably get similar results using a garden hose, or large (15 gallon?) bucket.The hotter the plaster is when you submerge it, the faster it decomposes into sludge.Just wait for the water to stop boiling, before reaching in to get your pieces. :-)

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  • Knife Forged From Bicycle Spokes - a Truly Bespoke Knife!

    You likely could disassemble, case harden, and return to active service.A good case hardening may not last the "lifetime of the blade" but shouldgive a good decade, unless in the hands of a professional chef.One thing I've always wondered. Why mark substandard product?I've only ever used my touchmark (or engraving) on products I am proud of.Even in ceramics, I would rather engrave my mark later, if I thought the fired piece may not come out to my satisfaction. Sure, I've made plenty ofutility grade stuff, and it is OK, and I even tell people I made it. But to receive my mark, it has to meet my expectations. I suppose, I have see plenty of examples of markings that are struck out later.For instance, grey market knife blade kits supplied with factory second bladesthat have their m…

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    You likely could disassemble, case harden, and return to active service.A good case hardening may not last the "lifetime of the blade" but shouldgive a good decade, unless in the hands of a professional chef.One thing I've always wondered. Why mark substandard product?I've only ever used my touchmark (or engraving) on products I am proud of.Even in ceramics, I would rather engrave my mark later, if I thought the fired piece may not come out to my satisfaction. Sure, I've made plenty ofutility grade stuff, and it is OK, and I even tell people I made it. But to receive my mark, it has to meet my expectations. I suppose, I have see plenty of examples of markings that are struck out later.For instance, grey market knife blade kits supplied with factory second bladesthat have their marks struck out. That would probably be better than what I've done.

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  • Other than a custom dial face, that is exactly what is used to do quick curve checks on optical lenses and lapping tools :-)Reinventing the wheel as it were, but a HECK of a lot cheaper!And 50MM spacing on the tips is/was industry standard.Seeing the math behind what makes the curve charts work is...impressive. Thanks for your explanation!As my tools like this are used exclusively with plastic, I believe that I couldepoxy a mini rare-earth magnet into a pocket of the probes, then the balltips become replaceable (don't we all have bags of ball bearings laying about the shop?)

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  • ironsmiter commented on timkrahmer's instructable Just a Test

    test score = pass

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  • ironsmiter commented on randofo's forum topic Recent Feed Page

    Thanks for listening, and bringing it back.If you could, put a big stickynote on the webpage coders monitor that says "Don't Break 'recent' feature with new code". That way we can avoid doing this again in a year or two.:-)

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  • r1 and r2 are likely 1/4 watt 100 ohm (5% tolerance) (brown black brown gold)d1 diode is..? and leds are normal cheapies. all are likely fine.r3 and r4 are too burned to see the color codes.they are likely 1 watt. If you tell us the power supply voltage/amperage and the battery voltage, we can calculate what should be there. (just read the stickers). The copper traces on the back side of that board are likely burned too, so you may need to solder in jumper wires to repair it.

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  • I just looked again at your case dimensions...That is a SMALL frame ;-)The two pair of folders I have on hand, the glasses measure in at 80X40X25mm.The second pair(+200 instead of your -150) measures smaller (65X40X20mm) but the soft case is larger. Weight, with glass lenses and case is 45 grams, so pretty close.And I figured that THEY were tiny.Yours look to manage that by using telescoping instead of folding arms, anda straight temple tip (no curved tip for the mastoid process)I would say, you managed to find a good technician that was up to the challenge.A rare thing in the optical industry these days :-)There ARE companies that make "myopia cheaters". Much less common ( you likely won't find them at the drugstore), but they do exist and at a similar price to readers. And con…

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    I just looked again at your case dimensions...That is a SMALL frame ;-)The two pair of folders I have on hand, the glasses measure in at 80X40X25mm.The second pair(+200 instead of your -150) measures smaller (65X40X20mm) but the soft case is larger. Weight, with glass lenses and case is 45 grams, so pretty close.And I figured that THEY were tiny.Yours look to manage that by using telescoping instead of folding arms, anda straight temple tip (no curved tip for the mastoid process)I would say, you managed to find a good technician that was up to the challenge.A rare thing in the optical industry these days :-)There ARE companies that make "myopia cheaters". Much less common ( you likely won't find them at the drugstore), but they do exist and at a similar price to readers. And consider adding a pair of the "Polarized Myopia Glasses" to your amazon shopping cart. you may find, after a day of hiking, you were glad of the sharper vision, and lack of tired eyes/headache.Now, if your hiking kit has tooth brushes with most of the handle cut off to save weight...well, the weight trade off vs vision benefit will be a personal decision. My hiking/camping packs always had a pair of sunglasses, even when I didn't have a prescription. I'd rather shave the grams off something less critical to my comfort.

    Some of the folding frames have an eyewire screw, that lets the frame open to accept the lens(see picture). THAT is the type of frame you should look for if you want a prescription put in it.The cheap frames without that screw...The shops were right to tell you no. AT BEST, itworks, but the lens is loose in the frame. At worst, they have to break the current lens toget it out, and quite probably chipping or breaking a few trying to get the new lenses in. All while trying to not break your cheap frames(not a condemnation, just a fact).Add to that the fact that your minus lens has a thicker, and therefore less flexible, edge.If the frames came with a reading GLASS lens(direct from china?)... odds are pretty goodit will have the screw, and be able to take a new lens.Not an endorsement of any…

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    Some of the folding frames have an eyewire screw, that lets the frame open to accept the lens(see picture). THAT is the type of frame you should look for if you want a prescription put in it.The cheap frames without that screw...The shops were right to tell you no. AT BEST, itworks, but the lens is loose in the frame. At worst, they have to break the current lens toget it out, and quite probably chipping or breaking a few trying to get the new lenses in. All while trying to not break your cheap frames(not a condemnation, just a fact).Add to that the fact that your minus lens has a thicker, and therefore less flexible, edge.If the frames came with a reading GLASS lens(direct from china?)... odds are pretty goodit will have the screw, and be able to take a new lens.Not an endorsement of any particular company, but on amazon, look at Doubletake or Lanfu, for examples of frames that WON'T drive your optician crazy.

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  • That won't filter anything much smaller than a dust bunny. Do the same thing, but using a scotch bright pad.When you can SEE the dirt on the pad, blow it off with canned air.And if you use something waterproof (NOT cardboard) for the frame,then you can actually WASH it.You could use any of the scrubbing pads, but 1/8" 3M scotch brightworks close to flawlessly in my experience. Just the right combo of filterand flow.

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  • If the battery case has the room, a second set of cells in parallel would likely eliminate the heat issue. By going 3s2p the draw at top amperage would be split between the cell groups. as a bonus, you may MORE than double run time.But only if there is room. it LOOKS like there is, but it would be tight and without having the case and cells on hand, it is just an educated guess.

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  • I am curious too. The "rough texture" seems like it would do more harm for grabbing onto solid waste than good from the hydrophobic nature.I think this treatment would be absolutely magnificent on a urinal though.

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  • You will probably find them to be 1650 mAh batteries, when properly tested. 3400 mAh is still the highest capacity commercially available cell that I know of, with 2600 being the capacity where cells begin to become affordable in a useful lot size.When the companies claim those numbers, it is often the total for the set. (9900 / 6 = 1650). Just something to keep in mind while shopping.

    If you are really concerned, get an external multi-chemistry/multi-cell hobby charger. Most will let you do a full charge/discharge/charge cycle, and give a convenient readout of actual cell capacity. Then, batch together matched cells, and leave the worrying till the pack begins to show signs of serious issues. If they are matched going in, they will likely remained matched for the life of the project.

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  • Take a page from the blacksmiths that have been doing this for decades now.Get some Kast-O-lite 30. Use it as a hardface for your fiber. Not only does it up the service temperature to 3000 (vs 1800-2600 depending on your ceramic blanket) But it will also lock in the fibers very neatly, AND get you up to temperature quicker than the blanket alone.While you are at it, I would seriously consider putting a refractory brick in the bottom. Just fit it in there, then mud over everything with the hardface.If you switch to a higher temperature fuel (waste oil burner, for example), then even the 3000 degree stuff will begin to fail eventually, you can just knock off the bad stuff, fill the cracks, and add another coat.

    Aluminium - 1200F, bronze - 1550F, Brass - 1650F, Copper - 2000F, Iron - 2300FBrass and bronze are fairly doable, temperature wise, but I advise against working brass untill you are WELL VERSED in the safety necessary. Zinc poisoning is bad, m'kay? Copper, silver, and gold are pushing the edge of what a furnace like this can do, but they CAN be done.The temperatures for iron and steel are only a few hundred degrees more, but those degrees bump you up into the next technology bracket. You need different furnace designs, different fuels systems, more and better safety equipment. If you really want to do iron, find a nearby university with a sculpture department, and see if they do iron pours. Even with brass, it may be better to go be a helper a few times, to get a feel for it first. These …

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    Aluminium - 1200F, bronze - 1550F, Brass - 1650F, Copper - 2000F, Iron - 2300FBrass and bronze are fairly doable, temperature wise, but I advise against working brass untill you are WELL VERSED in the safety necessary. Zinc poisoning is bad, m'kay? Copper, silver, and gold are pushing the edge of what a furnace like this can do, but they CAN be done.The temperatures for iron and steel are only a few hundred degrees more, but those degrees bump you up into the next technology bracket. You need different furnace designs, different fuels systems, more and better safety equipment. If you really want to do iron, find a nearby university with a sculpture department, and see if they do iron pours. Even with brass, it may be better to go be a helper a few times, to get a feel for it first. These metals are a whole different beast vs aluminium.

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  • ironsmiter made the instructable Swing Arm Wall Sconce
    Swing Arm Wall Sconce

    I needed a slightly beefier version, so made mine out of 3/4" black iron (gas pipe). Would have been 1/2", but the store was all out of 1/2" flanges, so everything got upgraded.The T-fitting was bored(clearance fit for the pipe nipple) and faced on my mini-lathe... but a good drill press or round file could have done the same(although it would take longer)Haven't gotten around to wiring the light YET, but an led spot will soon make it's appearance at the end of the arm.Thanks for the inspiration.

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  • ironsmiter commented on SankaranM's instructable Spinning Eyeball

    Agreed. 6AA, and a holder. While more expensive, it'll keep that motor humming along for a LONG time, compared to the same dollar worth of 9volts.

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  • I have a very nice 24 volt Bosch set. drill, circular and reciprocating saw, light, etc. ever battery pack has been rebuilt at least once. the charger is on its second universal replacement circuit board(current circuit is designed to charge 9.6-24 volt Menards house brand ni-cd/NMh batteries)Though hard use, and abuse (by others), just about everything has failed EXCEPT the tools themselves. Found a 12 volt one the other day, in a junk shop. for a fiver, I took a chance. Had badly worn brushes(I could start a camp fire, using the sparks coming out of that motor), but the battery was holding a charge. Works just fine in my 24 volt drill, just doesn't last as long.The final kicker is, when I went to replace the brushes... it uses the EXACT same motor as my 24 volt unit. The only difference…

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    I have a very nice 24 volt Bosch set. drill, circular and reciprocating saw, light, etc. ever battery pack has been rebuilt at least once. the charger is on its second universal replacement circuit board(current circuit is designed to charge 9.6-24 volt Menards house brand ni-cd/NMh batteries)Though hard use, and abuse (by others), just about everything has failed EXCEPT the tools themselves. Found a 12 volt one the other day, in a junk shop. for a fiver, I took a chance. Had badly worn brushes(I could start a camp fire, using the sparks coming out of that motor), but the battery was holding a charge. Works just fine in my 24 volt drill, just doesn't last as long.The final kicker is, when I went to replace the brushes... it uses the EXACT same motor as my 24 volt unit. The only difference between the drills is the battery, and a sticker! So, unless you start feeling the motor getting warm, I say, to heck with the (long expired) warranty, and crank up the volts. Just to be "safe", keep it at 1.5 x normal voltage. I have the feeling that running that 6 volt pink screwdriver off a 48 volt pack of 18650's is probably pushing the limits a little.

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  • ironsmiter commented on alex_mp's instructable DVI to ADC Converter

    Managed to get both DVI and ADC connectors from http://www.surplussales.com/Connectors/Video-Data....Might as well pick up 2 of each, at that price. have a spare, in case you screw up something. and if the first one goes well, make a second adapter.As for the PCB... the connectors use a 1.9mm spacing, so it is pretty much a guarantee you will need a custom PCB. There are a few people who have made them, including this guy http://www.jasondoesitall.com/adc/ (who kindly allowed access to his gerber files), so you can have them made up at any board fab facility.Don't forget a power connector, usb ports, and a really good solder iron.

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  • should not be too much smoke, once it is burning, but there will be a fair bit of ash. And lighting it off will probably take a small starter fire. I would say, every other piece of fuel you put on could be one of these.When I make smaller logs, I like to mix in a finely ground up old candle. For "starters", I also dip the logs in hot liquid wax for a few seconds. Just that extra bit of wax/paraffin makes a HUGE difference in burn quality. Old coffee grounds mixed in also make for a wonderful smelling fire, IMO :-)

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  • the link to "this amazing site" seems to be having issues :-(

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  • ironsmiter commented on ShalorM's instructable How to Make an "anvil"

    If you want to take it one step further, set it up right, and bed your ASO with lead. Just heat it up (carefully) and pour it down the hole. Not only will it add mass, you will also notice a lot less 'jump' when working on it. And less 'jump' means more of your effort is going into moving the hot metal, and less into moving the anvil.

    Welcome to the world of ASO (anvil shaped objects). It has a long and glorious history.Here are the basics for a beginners ASO...1) Get it as large and heavy as you can. If you can easily move it without help, it is probably too light unless you are only going to be doing small knives.2) a FLAT surface is a must. Railroad rail anvils often work better with the train side down! Or even stood on end (https://www.instructables.com/id/Railway-Line-Anvi... The "hardened face" of the rail is only work hardened from the trains rolling over it. 2 months of smithing on the flat side will do pretty much the same thing(but not as smooth an end product)3) The best you can get is probably good enough for now. Dense wooden stumps with nothing else CAN work OK as a temporary anvil, for some w…

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    Welcome to the world of ASO (anvil shaped objects). It has a long and glorious history.Here are the basics for a beginners ASO...1) Get it as large and heavy as you can. If you can easily move it without help, it is probably too light unless you are only going to be doing small knives.2) a FLAT surface is a must. Railroad rail anvils often work better with the train side down! Or even stood on end (https://www.instructables.com/id/Railway-Line-Anvi... The "hardened face" of the rail is only work hardened from the trains rolling over it. 2 months of smithing on the flat side will do pretty much the same thing(but not as smooth an end product)3) The best you can get is probably good enough for now. Dense wooden stumps with nothing else CAN work OK as a temporary anvil, for some work. Dished stumps are about the ONLY good anvil for doing bowls, and rough forging plate armour. Add a plate of steel, and it becomes pretty darn good. Make that plate a block, and it works even better. There is even a youtube video of norse(swedish?) re-enactors forging billets of homemade iron on large stones, using wooden mallets as sledge hammers.4) Did I mention as large and heavy as you can? In general, you want your anvil to weight 10-20 times as much as the largest hammer you are going to use on it. (This is why jewelers can get away with little 1-2lb stainless steel anvils. Those little hammers are only 2-3 ozs.) But when in doubt, heavier is better.5) Hardened striking surface. Strong and hard, but not brittle.You are now approaching a 'real' anvil. unless you happen to find this in the junk yard, and it is JUST RIGHT... you are probably going to spend just as much getting this cut, ground, hardened and tempered, as you would have buying a nice used anvil on craigslist, or ebay.I have forged on closed vices, railroad anvils, broken truck axles, old busted farm anvils, random blocks of plate steel, brand new $1000 anvils... and when it was all said and done,the things that had the most impact on the finished project were my choice of hammer, my skill, and keeping the metal at the right temperature. The anvils just made it a little easier/more tedious.

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  • Warm citric acid for cleaning copper...For nickleplating, a jewelry ultrasonic cleaner would be a Good, chemical free cleaner, at leadt a vety good start.

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  • I would be very tempted to either make (from drill rod) or buy a small boring bar, and starting about 1/2" back from the hole mouth, bore out the ID.That should preserve the look, and function of the pen while allowing your hand to actually hold and write for more than 2 min at a time. Even if the drilled hole went to 95% depth, it still has to weight a pretty good amount, and at that scale, every tiny bit of material removed is going to make a large difference.

    If you can very carefully drill the center hole with a drill press...The rest of the shaping could be done on a bench grinder.A lathe just makes it a lot simpler, and quicker to set up and execute.

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  • There can be some subtle differences in technique, but basically, get a flat bladed screwdriver, and a length of heavy gauge wire with aligator clips on both ends. Clip one end onto the screwdriver, and the other to ground. Carefully poke around under the rubber cap with the tip of the screwdriver until you hear the ZZzzzzttttpppop sound.

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  • ironsmiter commented on Navy Wolves's instructable DIY Dog Snow Fort

    Now, toss in a busted bale of hay, and you have a happy puppy den.

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  • ironsmiter commented on mrpropmaster's instructable Restoring an Axe

    only a good solution, if you are also replacing the handle.We know what happens if you soak a wood handle overnight in ANYTHING liquid... loose handle immenint.

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  • Is it closer to a tortilla or closer to naan? Or neither, and more like a thin crust pizza without toppings?

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  • perlite and vermiculite can both be found pretty darn easy, even in small towns. you just have to know where to look.The gardening center of even a tiny hardware store should have 5lb bags of both. ANY greenhouse type store will have both, and almost any building center will at least have perlite.Just be aware that it will make a lighter product with better insulating qualities, but it will NOT raise the temperature resistance of your formula.Personally, I use an almost 50/50 mixture of kaolin and kyanite, and then add 'busted crucible and firebrick grog" to the mix. Regular grog is too variable for my taste. I have successfully melted small batched of iron using my recipe. You do need to fire the vessel(like any other high temperature ceramic vessel) before putting it into service. …

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    perlite and vermiculite can both be found pretty darn easy, even in small towns. you just have to know where to look.The gardening center of even a tiny hardware store should have 5lb bags of both. ANY greenhouse type store will have both, and almost any building center will at least have perlite.Just be aware that it will make a lighter product with better insulating qualities, but it will NOT raise the temperature resistance of your formula.Personally, I use an almost 50/50 mixture of kaolin and kyanite, and then add 'busted crucible and firebrick grog" to the mix. Regular grog is too variable for my taste. I have successfully melted small batched of iron using my recipe. You do need to fire the vessel(like any other high temperature ceramic vessel) before putting it into service. And before each use, I thoroughly dry it next to the glory hole, so that any absorbed moisture from the evening before doesn't explode my precious clay metal melters. If you intend to do iron though, best off just getting a good graphite crucible or 4. For aluminium, a small, deep cast iron pot with a clay wash works as well or better than ceramic crucibles. Bronze requires the same basic set up as iron. Just my two cents.

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  • Awesome job cutting that brass bar stock. my cuts never come out that clean.You must sharpen your knife more often than I do. And a I love the part where you properly lubricate your framing square before every use too.

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  • with the old feeder goldfish, wasn't really a problem, as they weren't too smart. Any that got loose were quickly eaten by the sport fish. They also take a fair bit of time to grow large enough to be a problem...Now, take your current asian carp and you have a problem. Faster growing, 'smarter', and much more aggressive. they can quickly decimate a local diverse fish population.

    I wonder what the long term effects are... gold fish are pretty hardy, but breathing that stuff may not be good for them. less of a problem in bait fish. more of an issue for pets.Presumably, after a few weeks, they would return to their normal color.

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  • I wonder if you put the charge circuit in parallel with the old circuit...It SHOULD continue to register a charged battery just like normal. If not, perhaps a set of diodes on the charge circuit lines would prevent residual voltage bleeding, and give accurate battery monitoring back? I THINK most tablets monitor actual battery voltage, so should read properly once calibrated with a full charge/discharge/charge cycle. As long as none of the monitoring traces have been damaged.One of the circuit gurus may have a different opinion. but it is a place to start, if you want to try on the next fix.

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  • ironsmiter commented on joshr35's instructable Hand Forged Rose

    It would take some more time and skill, but you could split the leaves off the stem, and forge them out, instead of welding on. Slightly widen the spot for the leaf, get it nice and hot(yellow, at least, for mild steel), and use a sharp hot chisel. Once split , and bent at 90, forge it out, then bend into a more natural curve.Completely agree that forge welding the finished leaf on, while doable, could be very tricky to get the temperatures right on both pieces.The painted version is ... interesting. Depends on what you like better, I guess. I think I like the 'pure' metal look better, but what do I know, eh?

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  • I think my forge / BBQ / Standing Firepit now needs a pretty new upgrade.Thanks for the inspiration. Hopefully the SO doesn't force me to make seasonal spinners.

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  • I would reach out to the Flordia Artist Blacksmith Association.( http://blacksmithing.org/ )I am sure they could help you out with starter coal, or a solid lead on where to buy it. Personally, even being from Illinois (lots of coal here, not all smithing grade though), It's hard to beat some of the internet pricing for 50lb bags of coal. When i take a trip near the mines, I swing in and pick up a couple hundred pounds, But if I am running low, amazon is just a click away, and a heck of a lot faster than planning a long vacation weekend

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  • If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save.Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change.Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there. 1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the …

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    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save.Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change.Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there. 1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks!Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!This is video 1 in a series of 'ancient' people using dirt and firewood to turn other dirt into an iron and forge spear head ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_mTgHj6M1Q )

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the…

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    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks! Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the…

    see more »

    If you really need to get started "dirt cheap" then that is a place to save. Literally, DIRT. ANY commercial refractory is going to cost a chunk of change. Dirt is usually free. and high-clay dirt is even better. Just mix it a little moist, so that it clumps, and packs well... then jam it in there.1) Yes, it will dry and crack.2) No, it is not as good as refractory3) Yes, it will work just fine, till you have a chance to upgrade.Almost any cracking will be filled with dust from your fuel, and that stuff is a pretty good insulator also. Just remember, "Professional" forges are basically cast iron bowls, so the insulation for your BBQ is only "needed" for high temperature operation (like forge welding, where the insulation concentrates the heat) and to keep the thin steel from oxidizing through (rust or burn, it's just a matter of time and speed).For fuel, you can actually get some reasonable work done using hardwood chunks! Hardwood charcoal is better(less smoke and impurities grunging up your steel). BBQ briquettes WILL work, if it is your only fuel, but don't expect forging to be easy or clean. And forge welding is pretty much right out the window.As to lighting the fire... I was taught to use the newspaper. Two to three sheets crumpled up, lit on the edge, buried in coal, then turn the blower on. If you have pre-made coke from your last forge session, you can cut that down to a half sheet of newspaper ;-)Just remember, the first blacksmiths likely used campfires and rocks to beat metals into compliance. Any more modern technology you use just gives you a head start!Video series of taking dirt and firewood, turning more dirt into iron, then forging a weapon of war!

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  • Rough up the surface around the broken fan blade with a file, or sandpaper.clean it really well.JB weld, or Bondic will make for a very securely fastened balancer. It won't blow as well, with the missing blade, but it should let you run at full speed without the fan tearing itself apart, or killing the bearings.

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  • MY final step before seasoning, is to stick my cast iron in a turkey fryer, and boil it for a half hour or so. Any soap that made it into the metal will surely come loose, along with the last bits of iron dust, and any remaining bio material. For "lesser" cleaning, I just stick it on the stove top, fill with water, and simmer. works pretty darn well.For seasoning, my latest try is coconut oil (been using it for all my cooking lately). Works pretty well, and doesn't seem to have made a negative taste impact to anything I've cooked.But Lodge has a specific seasoning spray they sell. 100% canola oil. And cast iron is what they do. So, if you don't want to experiment, follow the experts, and use canola.

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  • seems like a lot of sugar for an already sweet banana might try subbing coconut flour for half the sugar

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  • I THINK the direct link to the page is here http://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89...to save you time, scrolling through translated pages of linked papercraft.To quote from the site "Copyright basically paper belong to Furukawa and studio nozzle. Customers secondary processing in the category of personal enjoyment, the public, etc. is free. However, if you want to use as follows: Please note. ○ companies, organizations to be used for commercial purposes please refrain. ○ (such as catalogs, flyers, business cards) secondary processing for commercial purposes, please contact our regard, such as manufacturing and sales."For now, the pattern is a freely linked download.

    sorry, this one is actually the number ONE forest dragon.http://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89%E3%83%A9%E3%82%B4%E3%83%B3%E3%81%AE%E5%9E%8B%E7%B4%99no-1_forestdragon/

    sorry, this one is actually the number ONE forest dragon.http://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89%E3%83%A9%E3%82%B4%E3%83%B3%E3%81%AE%E5%9E%8B%E7%B4%99no-1_forestdragon/

    Sorry, the link should have been to the NUMBER ONE forest dragon. correct link belowhttp://furukawa21.jp/craftclub/craftinfo/%E3%83%89...

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  • Keep us up to date on the durability of the integrated hinge design!For "softer nose pads", stop by the local optical shop. Usually, they should have both aftermarket replacement pads which you could clip off the attachment method and adhere them to the frame, or possibly use one of the "no slip silicon nose pad" pads used to "fix" plastic frames for people with nose fitment issues. If you find a good independent optical shop, you may be able to have them fit nose pad arms to the frame (though they will need to know the material properties of your printer filament to even try). It is pretty easily done with acetate frames, but with your printed frames, it would be an experiment.Shaping over an open flame is.... risky. A hot air gun, diffused, and set at a dis…

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    Keep us up to date on the durability of the integrated hinge design!For "softer nose pads", stop by the local optical shop. Usually, they should have both aftermarket replacement pads which you could clip off the attachment method and adhere them to the frame, or possibly use one of the "no slip silicon nose pad" pads used to "fix" plastic frames for people with nose fitment issues. If you find a good independent optical shop, you may be able to have them fit nose pad arms to the frame (though they will need to know the material properties of your printer filament to even try). It is pretty easily done with acetate frames, but with your printed frames, it would be an experiment.Shaping over an open flame is.... risky. A hot air gun, diffused, and set at a distance is much better. Better still, put a small pan of salt on a hot plate, and set the temperature to "Just right, Goldilocks", and use that to heat the frame for bending. Normal temperatures are between 150F and 300F, but without the data on your feed stock, you should start at the low end, and work your way up. You know it was too hot, or in for too long when your frame takes on little dented textures matching the shape of salt crystals ;-) Maybe print out a test piece, and use that to calibrate your temperature before sacrificing your finished frames.

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