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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    Hi Toby,On the video everything looks good. Of course, the mcu just runs its program and doesn't know the printer has crashed, but it's good to know that the mcu is intact. Check things like correct paper size, manual feed slot, etc. Make sure there is no mechanical problem slowing down the carrier as it moves through the printer. The critical element is the time between the manual feed clutch going low and the npis going low. There is a time window (3.875 to 4.575 seconds) that starts when the clutch goes low (clutch pulls in) and ends when the npis sees the hole. After that, the mcu takes complete control and sends the printer spoofed sensor signals: the exit sensor, paper in sensor and manual feed paper sensor have been physically removed but the printer thinks they are still there. ...

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    Hi Toby,On the video everything looks good. Of course, the mcu just runs its program and doesn't know the printer has crashed, but it's good to know that the mcu is intact. Check things like correct paper size, manual feed slot, etc. Make sure there is no mechanical problem slowing down the carrier as it moves through the printer. The critical element is the time between the manual feed clutch going low and the npis going low. There is a time window (3.875 to 4.575 seconds) that starts when the clutch goes low (clutch pulls in) and ends when the npis sees the hole. After that, the mcu takes complete control and sends the printer spoofed sensor signals: the exit sensor, paper in sensor and manual feed paper sensor have been physically removed but the printer thinks they are still there. If all the printer settings are correct, if the time between the clutch going low and the npis sensing the hole is correct, the printer cannot crash.One other thing: the beeper cuts off at 3.5 seconds to maximize the time you have to push the carrier in. If your reflexes are too fast, it is possible to push it in too quickly and the printer will error out. Or, of course, if you are too slow, it will also error out.Mark

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 for Direct Laser Printing of Printed Circuit Boards

    This version is obsolete. The simplest and best implementation is here: <https://www.instructables.com/id/Modification-of-the-Lexmark-E260-Laser-Printer-for/>The position of the mfps is not critical. All it does is senses the presence of the carrier at the manual feed slot and tells the printer to "pull" the carrier into the rollers. The leading edge of the carrier will then sit some small distance (an inch or so) past the rollers, waiting for the print command. When you click on "print" in your software, the carrier advances into the printer and hits the pis. The pis is located about 2.5 inches from the center of the front rollers. The mfps is perhaps 1 inch in front of the rollers. Unfortunately, I do not have a fully intact E260, so I cannot accurately plac...

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    This version is obsolete. The simplest and best implementation is here: <https://www.instructables.com/id/Modification-of-the-Lexmark-E260-Laser-Printer-for/>The position of the mfps is not critical. All it does is senses the presence of the carrier at the manual feed slot and tells the printer to "pull" the carrier into the rollers. The leading edge of the carrier will then sit some small distance (an inch or so) past the rollers, waiting for the print command. When you click on "print" in your software, the carrier advances into the printer and hits the pis. The pis is located about 2.5 inches from the center of the front rollers. The mfps is perhaps 1 inch in front of the rollers. Unfortunately, I do not have a fully intact E260, so I cannot accurately place the mfps, though it is not at all critical. Hope this helps.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    The + of Piezo beeper goes to Vcc, the 5 volt supply. The most convenient place is the pad marked J21+ .Negative of the piezo goes to pin 2 of the Attiny13 at the pad marked BP-. The pad marked 25-2 connects to J25, pin 2 of the printer's circuit board. Make sure you are using a piezo that has a driver built in so that it "beeps" when dc voltage is applied.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    I've considered it, but I would probably use the Pantum printer instead of the E260. Not sure I want to tie up that much of my time and energy, but if someone is interested in partnering with me, I'd be interested in looking at it.Mark

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    Sorry, I can't help you there. Studio 7 is free and you can get a programmer on Amazon for $10 USD, but I'm not familiar with the Teensy.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    I used Atmel Studio 4, but Studio 7.0 is now available (free) and works fine. The pcb is set up for In Circuit Programming (ISP) using an AVRISP II programmer or equivalent. Not sure why you would need the Teensy3.2

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  • Modification of the Pantum 2502W for Direct Laser Printing of Printer Circuit Boards

    Yes. I think that is by far the easiest and most reliable way of making double sided boards. A couple of registration holes would help, too.

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  • Modification of the Pantum 2502W for Direct Laser Printing of Printer Circuit Boards

    Here's a link to an inexpensive datalogger <https://www.dataq.com/data-acquisition/starter-kits/?source=homepage>. I've tried several HP printers, and they all do the same thing. Instead of printing solid traces, they just print the outlines of the traces. I assume it's a question of the voltages used by HP not allowing the transfer of the image to copper properly.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    Please check again. I believe pin 2 is correct. Pin 1 goes to 24 volts, pin 2 is, I believe) attached to the drain of a mosfet on the printers circuit board. You can email me directly mlerman@ix.netcom.com to discuss.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    I'm not sure what's wrong, but a few questions: Do you hear the beep when you start to print? Does the beep stop? Do you start pushing the carrier in when the beep stops? Are there any error leds lit after the print? A lot of people think they should start the carrier when the beep starts, but that is wrong - you start when the beep ends. Also, there is a fairly narrow timing window, and if you have a lot of friction, it can throw the timing off. That is why I only used one rail. The carrier wedged just enough so that it was unreliable. I would suggest removing the left rail and seeing what happens. Let me know how it goes.

    It will print from whatever program you want, just like any other printer. See my response to dmunka above.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    Could you send me a picture of your problem ground planes? How large a pcb are you printing? You can send me a jpg directly at mlerman@ix.netcom.com

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 for Direct Laser Printing of Printed Circuit Boards

    Yes, heat would work just fine. For me, it's a bit easier to use the acetone. Especially for a 2 sided board where I just hang it suspended in a tall closed container with a half inch of acetone in the bottom. When I'm done, I just air dry the pcb for a few seconds and pour the acetone back in it's can.

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  • Modification of the Lexmark E260 Laser Printer for Direct Laser Printing of Double Sided Printed Circuit Boards

    The code is very simple, and an Arduino could certainly do it. The timing is explained in the comments in the code.

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  • Modification of the Pantum 2502W for Direct Laser Printing of Printer Circuit Boards

    Sorry for the lateness of this reply - I was away. I have not tried ds boards with the Pantum, but something like I did with the E260<https://www.instructables.com/id/Modification-of-th...>would probably work reasonably well.

    Well, I have sold some from time to time, as well as completely modified printers and some parts, but more as a service than a business. Are you interested in one? Sorry for the lateness of this reply-I was away.

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  • Modification of the Pantum 2502W for Direct Laser Printing of Printer Circuit Boards

    Hi Roland,The only laser printers that I know won't print to copper are the HP ones. If you can get the service manual (not the user manual), that is a big help in doing any conversion.What I have done is attach a simple data logger (e.g. one of the Dataq ones) to the various sensors, then run a print to get the timing as the paper moves through the printer. You also have to be able to make a flat path through the printer since carriers and pcbs are not as flexible as paper.The Lexmark E260 and the Pantum 2502 are very different. The Pantum actually prints as the paper goes up the back of the printer. Many of the inexpensive printers print this way, and they have the least number of sensors you have to emulate. In fact, the Pantum has only 1 sensor. It also has one solenoid that is acti...

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    Hi Roland,The only laser printers that I know won't print to copper are the HP ones. If you can get the service manual (not the user manual), that is a big help in doing any conversion.What I have done is attach a simple data logger (e.g. one of the Dataq ones) to the various sensors, then run a print to get the timing as the paper moves through the printer. You also have to be able to make a flat path through the printer since carriers and pcbs are not as flexible as paper.The Lexmark E260 and the Pantum 2502 are very different. The Pantum actually prints as the paper goes up the back of the printer. Many of the inexpensive printers print this way, and they have the least number of sensors you have to emulate. In fact, the Pantum has only 1 sensor. It also has one solenoid that is activated when the printer is about to print.The E260 prints as the paper goes from the front to the back of the printer. It also has a manual feed slot that I use to feed the pcb. This printer has a lot more sensors that need to be emulated.Not sure if this helps. One suggestion is to buy a couple of cheap used printers of the same type and start experimenting with the thought of probably destroying one as you learn.Good Luck!

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